The “Case” For Eating Greener

Share Button

broccoliYour Health Journal…..”I wanted to promote a great article today in The Observer by Patty Hammond about the importance of eating healthy, especially your vegetables. Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease. Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers. Diets rich in foods containing fiber, such as some vegetables and fruits, may reduce the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Eating foods such as vegetables that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake. I suggest you visit The Observer web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It is one of the most informative articles I have read recently.”

From the article…..

If you want to attain and maintain a healthy weight, as well as reduce your risk for developing chronic disease, it’s time to realize how important it is to eat your vegetables.

Not only do vegetables provide loads of nutrients like potassium, folic acid, vitamin A, vitamin C and dietary fiber, eating more of them can also help you consume fewer calories overall. That’s because fiber-containing foods, like vegetables, make you feel full more quickly. Plus, most vegetables are lower in fat and calories per cup than other foods and you won’t find any cholesterol in them. However, you need to be smart about how you prepare and serve them because sauces and seasonings can quickly add a lot of fat, calories, and sometimes even cholesterol to your vegetable dishes.

So how many vegetables should you be eating every day? Probably more than you’re currently eating, if you’re like most people. This is especially true if you eat a lot of greasy starchy fast food French fries and not many other vegetables. According to MyPlate.gov, the amount of vegetables you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. Most adults should try to eat at least two or three cups of vegetables a day. When determining how much a single serving should be, just remember that, in general, one cup of vegetable juice, raw or cooked vegetables is a single serving, but when you eat raw leafy greens you need to eat two full cups to count them as one serving.
– See more at: http://www.observertoday.com/page/content.detail/id/582014/Eat-greener-during-National-Nutrition-Month.html?nav=5060#sthash.3j00XcaW.dpuf

To read the full article…..Click here

Comments are closed.