Guidelines Tell U.S. Consumers To Say “No” To Sugar

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This article is courtesy of PRweb, please share your comments below…..

http://yourhealthjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kickhabit.jpgThe U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which are released every five years, were issued last week and one of the new guidelines’ strongest recommendation is something that consumers have already caught on to — limiting sugar intake, reports The NPD Group, a leading global information company. Overall, U.S. consumers have indicated that sugar is the number one item they try to avoid in their diet and are eating less sugary foods and beverages, according to NPD’s ongoing food consumption research.

The new dietary guidelines recommend that only 10 percent of daily calories come from added sugars. Although this may sound like a lofty goal, consumers have cut down on foods and beverages with high sugar content, like carbonated soft drinks, fruit drinks and juice, ice cream and frozen treats, and other sweet snacks. Consumption of sugar-free, unsweetened, or reduced sugar products, which is highest among young children and adults 55 and older, follows the trend in concern about sugar overall. Calories were once the top item consumers looked for on nutrition facts labels, but now it is sugar.

Cholesterol, the outcast of past dietary guidelines, is no longer a dietary concern according to the new guidelines. NPD’s food consumption research shows that consumers are in line with this since their concern for cholesterol content has continued to decline since 2006. Eggs, which bore the brunt of the anti-cholesterol push, are back in vogue and consumption is up as consumers look for more sources of protein.

Eating more fruits and vegetables is a perennial federal dietary standard and is still front-and-center in the new guidelines. There is good and bad news in regards to this standard. The good news is: consumers are eating more fruits and fruit is among the top growing better-for-you snacks. The bad news is: vegetables are still fighting to find their way into Americans’ hearts and stomachs.

“Consumer alignment with the new guidelines speaks volumes to our collective shift toward eating more healthfully,” says Darren Seifer, NPD food and beverage industry analyst. “We have nutritional information at our fingertips. Some seek it consciously and others hear it subliminally. If there is a weight or health problem, it’s typically not a result of nutritional ignorance.”

About The NPD Group
The NPD Group provides global information and advisory services to drive better business decisions. By combining unique data assets with unmatched industry expertise, we help our clients track their markets, understand consumers, and drive profitable growth. Sectors covered include automotive, beauty, consumer electronics, entertainment, fashion, food / foodservice, home, luxury, mobile, office supplies, sports, technology, toys, and video games. For more information, visit http://www.npd.com and npdgroupblog.com. Follow us on Twitter: @npdgroup.

Added Sugar Could Contribute To Added Holiday Pounds

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– Submitted by The Baylor College of Medicine

partycelebrateThe holidays can be a tricky time for those with a sweet tooth, but according to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine, we should all be aware of the amount of added sugar we’re consuming year-round and especially during the holidays.

“The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories of added sugar per day for women (about six teaspoons) and 150 calories of added sugar per day for men (about nine teaspoons). While you might not add this amount of sugar to your food, many foods come with the sugar already in the product,” said Roberta Anding, registered dietitian with Baylor and Texas Children’s Hospital.

Anding, who is also a sports dietitian, notes that the major sources of added sugars are sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda and fruit punch.

“You might not consume those types of beverages, but don’t forget your lattes, hot chocolate, egg nog and other holiday beverages,” she said.

The dangers of consuming too much sugar can be weight gain, accumulation of visceral or belly fat and an increased desire for more sugar. The visceral or belly fat can be viewed as an endocrine organ, meaning it could cause inflammation and contribute to the development of diabetes and heart disease.

She notes that artificial sweeteners should also be used with caution as recent studies suggest they may alter the natural balance of bacteria in the gut.

When reading nutrition labels, Anding says to look for words such as cane syrup, sucrose, maltose, rice syrup, coconut sugar, dextrose, palm sugar and agave. To reduce sugars, she recommends saving sugar for desserts and avoiding sugar in beverages of all kinds.

“Start to downsize your portions. Take half of a dessert or share one with a family member. You can still have the sweet treat – just less of it,” she said.

Alleviate “Sugar Sag” With A Healthier Diet

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Submitted by Julia Parsons from the Baylor College of Medicine….

healthychoiceEveryone wants to age gracefully but they may not know that certain foods cause “sugar sag,” which results in wrinkles and loose skin.

Sugar sag is essentially a loss of elasticity in the skin that occurs from elevated levels of blood sugar, explains Dr. Rajani Katta, professor in the department of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine. Naturally over time everyone’s skin will begin to lose elasticity, however eating certain foods over time can accelerate the process.

While many think of sugar itself as the main culprit, any foods that raise blood sugar, including simple carbohydrates, such as white bread and white rice, can cause collagen fibers to become brittle and not function as well.

“Research has shown that elevated blood sugar can lead to changes in the collagen and elastic fibers of the skin via a process known as glycation,” Katta said. “This results in cross-linking of the skin fibers, causing increased stiffness and reduced elasticity.”

These changes promote wrinkles, and once wrinkles are formed, there is no natural remedy to reverse it.

However, it is possible to counteract it, says Katta.

She recommends that people incorporate more fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices into their diets as a way to prevent sugar sag and its negative effects, like wrinkles and jowls.

These foods keep the skin healthy and slow the process of visible aging on the skin.

“The idea behind preventing sugar sag is ‘better skin from the inside out,’” said Katta. “What you eat affects your skin.”

Katta says adopting better eating habits, protecting skin from the sun and not smoking are the best proactive ways to care for skin and age gracefully through life.

Your Guide To Cutting Down On Fats, Salt And Sugar – Part 2

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

saltshakerYou can reduce your sodium intake if you:

1. Cook at home from scratch and reduce the amount of salt you add to dishes.

2. Check labels for sodium in all its forms. Table salt is mainly sodium chloride, but canned or packaged foods can contain other forms of sodium.

3. In the kitchen and at the dinner table, substitute spices, herbs, and salt-free blends for salt.

4. When you do opt for packaged foods, choose products that are sodium free or low in sodium. A typical cup of miso soup, for instance, contains 700 to 900 milligrams of sodium, so look for canned soups with “low sodium” or “reduced sodium” on the label. Bread and cereals carry loads of sodium. Buy the lowest sodium kind you can find and avoid white flour brands.

5. Watch out for salad dressings, ready- made pasta sauces, cup-o-soup products, canned vegetables, frozen pizzas, sausages, pepperoni, canned tuna, and pretty much any food that requires preservation or shelf life.

6. In a restaurant, ask your waiter which dishes are the lowest in sodium and ask of the chef can prepare yours without adding salt.

The overall best approach is to scan the ingredient list before eating or drinking anything. Any ingredient with “sodium” or “Na” — the chemical name for sodium — in its name contains the substance. Sodium might also be labeled as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate or salt.

Sugar

Astonishingly, Americans consume an estimated 130 pounds of added sugar per capita annually. That’s about 22 teaspoons daily for adults; roughly 32 teaspoons children (almost three-fourths of a cup). Topping the added-sugar intake list are soft drinks, accounting for 33 percent of added sugar consumed daily.

Overconsumption of added sugar and high-glycemic carbohydrates (like those found in breads, pizza, cold cereals and other baked goods) has been linked to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

One of the most effective things you can do to improve your health is to cut back radically on sugar consumption; in particular, avoid sugared beverages entirely. If this seems overwhelming, taper off slowly – add slightly less sugar to your coffee or tea every day and start by drinking fewer soft drinks per week, etc. You will quickly discover that the craving for sugar dissipates. Foods that once seemed pleasantly sweet begin to taste sickly sweet .

Steer clear of artificial sweeteners – they have chemical components and adverse long term health consequences and the best solution is to choose natural sweeteners like organic raw sugar, maple syrup, or fruit sauces (apple or pear) and cut way back on quantity and portion size.

If you reduce your consumption of Bad saturated fats, salt and sugar you will be on your way to a healthier body, a leaner frame, more energy and you will reduce your risk for heart disease, stroke, obesity and diabetes.

Kac Young has earned three doctorate degrees: a Ph.D in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a spiritual counselor, a teacher, and a licensed Religious Science minister. Her books: “21 Days to the Love of Your Life”; “Discover Your Spiritual Genius”; “Dancing With the Moon,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Gold Mind,” “Heart Easy,” “The Path to Fabulous,” “Cheese Dome Power,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies,” and “Supreme Healing,” are designed to give the reader tools for self improvement.

[1] Conducted by an international team led by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian of Harvard University’s School of Public Health, was published Aug. 13, 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Your Guide To Cutting Down On Fats, Salt And Sugar – Part 1

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Fats:

healthychoiceThere are two kinds of fats: Good and Bad.

The good guys are unsaturated fats: monounsaturateds (MUFAs), found in foods like olive oil and avocados, and polyunsaturateds (PUFAs), found in sunflower and corn oils, among others, and in the omega-3s in salmon and walnuts. Both types the “good ” title because they’ve been shown to lower blood cholesterol and the risk for heart disease.

The villain, we’ve long been told, is saturated fat. The conventional wisdom, which dates to the 1950s, is that saturated fat, which is present in meat, dairy, and some plant products, increases our total cholesterol and chance for heart disease and stroke. Trans fat, the staple fat that dominates packaged goods and fast food, is another very bad guy: It not only gooses up our LDL cholesterol but also lowers our HDL cholesterol (the kind that helps sweep bad cholesterol out of the body). The American Heart Association recommends limiting your intake of saturated fat to less than 7 percent of your total calories (if you eat 2,000 calories a day, that’s 16 grams, roughly the amount in a chocolate milk shake) and of trans fats to no more than two grams a day. Safest idea is to have NO trans fats per day.

What you can do immediately is swap animal fats for vegetable oils — for instance, using soybean oil or olive oil instead of butter because studies have shown these lower LDL cholesterol levels and disease risk. “Be careful not to replace saturated fats with refined carbs or your triglycerides can go up and your good HDL cholesterol can go down,” explains Alice H. Lichtenstein, the director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University. High triglycerides and low HDL are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and criteria of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health problems linked to heart disease and diabetes.

Salt:

Across the world, the excessive consumption of sodium–hiding in breads, soups and snack foods and beckoning from salt shakers everywhere–is the cause of some 1.65 million deaths by heart disease and strokes yearly, including roughly 667,000 “premature” deaths–those before the age of 70–says a comprehensive new study [1].

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state: ” We all need a small amount (e.g., between about 180 mg and 500 mg per day) of sodium to keep our bodies working properly. But the average daily sodium intake for Americans age 2 years and older is 3,436 mg.”

High sodium consumption raises blood pressure and high blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the nation’s first and third leading causes of death, respectively.

Research shows when salt intake is reduced, blood pressure begins decreasing for most people within a few days to weeks. Populations who consume diets low in salt do not experience the increase in blood pressure with age that is seen in most Western countries.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

Kac Young has earned three doctorate degrees: a Ph.D in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a spiritual counselor, a teacher, and a licensed Religious Science minister. Her books: “21 Days to the Love of Your Life”; “Discover Your Spiritual Genius”; “Dancing With the Moon,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Gold Mind,” “Heart Easy,” “The Path to Fabulous,” “Cheese Dome Power,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies,” and “Supreme Healing,” are designed to give the reader tools for self improvement.

50 Reasons Why Sugar Is Bad

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By Dr. Michael Wald

http://yourhealthjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kickhabit.jpg1. Sugar can suppress the immune system

2. Sugar off sets the mineral balance within the body

3. Sugar increases inflammation

4. Sugar lowers cellular and humeral immunity

5. Sugar can cause heart and vessel disease

6. Sugar can cause diabetes

7. Sugar can cause fatigue

8. Sugar can worsen infections

9. Sugar increases fasting glucose levels

10. Sugar can cause tooth decay

11. Sugar contributes to obesity

12. Sugar causes copper deficiency

13. Sugars reduces HDL

14. Sugar can cause Heart Disease

15. Sugar can elevate LDL (bad cholesterol)

16. Sugar can cause depression

17. Sugar feeds cancer

18. Sugar can exacerbate premenstrual syndrome

19. Sugar causes varicose veins

20. Sugar can contribute to acne

21. Sugar may contribute to memory loss

22. Sugar causes loss of nutrition through the urine including chromium and magnesium

23. Sugar suppresses the release of HGH (Human Growth Hormone)

24. Sugar can increase the aging process

25 Sugar raises insulin levels and insulin resistance

26. Sugar increases triglyceride levels in the blood

27. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia

28. Sugar can contribute to anxiety

29. Sugar can contribute to the cause of multiple sclerosis

30. Sugar contributes to saliva and blood acidity

31. Sugar can increase cholesterol

32. Sugar can contribute to ADHD in children

33. Sugar can impair absorption of protein

34. Sugar can perpetuate insulin resistance

35. Sugar can cause drowsiness

36. Sugar contributes to food allergies

37. Sugar causes eczema

38. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA in children

39. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis

40. Sugar lowers enzyme function

41. Sugar causes constipation

42. Too much sugar affects sex hormones

43. Sugar causes acid reflux

44. Sugar may contribute to high blood pressure

45. Sugar causes migraines

46. Sugar causes atrophy of the muscle

47. Sugar decreases healing time

48. Sugar contributes to the cause of metabolic syndrome

49. Sugar causes chronic fatigue

50. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

The Low Down On Sugar: Understanding Your Cravings – Part 2

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By Christie Korth, CHC AADP

Continued from Part 1 of this article…..

fruitswhiteAs far as sugar is concerned, you can easily take matters into your own hands by choosing sugars which are considered complex carbohydrates vs. refined or simple carbs. Complex carbs, like fruits, veggies, beans and grains provide long lasting energy by releasing the sugars into the body slowly. Table sugar and “white foods” are refined carbohydrates which cause the blood sugar to spike due to its rapid release in the body. Refined or simple carbs pack on the pounds and contribute to diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease, arthritis; and more. While that peanut butter and banana sandwich my look amazing for lunch, consider eating only one slice of bread and subbing the rest of the meal with an apple. Notice if you have more or less energy when you eat this way. You are certainly getting more vitamins and allowing room for more whole foods, thus preventing disease and lowering your sugar intake.

Consider checking out more natural resources for sugar…

Maple Syrup: This product consists of brown rice that has been ground and cooked, converting the starches to maltose. Brown rice syrup tastes like moderately sweet butterscotch and is quite delicious. In recipes, you may have to use up to 50% more brown rice syrup than sugar, and reduce the amount of other liquids.

Agave Nectar: A natural liquid sweetener made from the juice of the agave cactus. It is 1.4 times sweeter than refined sugar, but does not create a “sugar rush,” and is much less disturbing to the body’s blood sugar levels than white sugar.

Molasses: Organic molasses is probably the most nutritious sweetener derived from sugar cane or sugar beet, and is made by a process of clarifying and blending the extracted juices. The longer the juice is boiled, the less sweet, more nutritious, and darker the product is. Molasses imparts a very distinct flavor to food. Blackstrap molasses, the most nutritious variety, is a good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, and potassium.

Dates: Dates are like natures candy and can be used to mimic caramel in snack bars when mixed with fried fruit and nuts. Dates can also be used can be used in salads, to sweeten baked goods, etc. Dates are high in minerals, particularly calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.

Dates are like natures candy and can be used to mimic caramel in snack bars when mixed with fried fruit and nuts.

Try using one of these natural sweeteners to swap out white sugar in your next holiday or dessert recipe. All three liquid sweeteners work very well in batters, cakes, smoothies, cereals, granola, and puddings. The dates work best in cakes, smoothies and bars. Natural sweeteners allow for the best way to enjoy sweets -without the guilt! If you can simply start by trying these recipes at home, you will be surprised how quickly and easily you can be healthier and happier by eating less refined sugar. To your health!

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

The Low Down On Sugar: Understanding Your Cravings – Part 1

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By Christie Korth, CHC AADP

junkfoodIt’s 3pm and you are sitting at your desk at work, trying to silently nudge the time along so you can clock out. You’re tired, and the candy machine in the lounge is calling your name. A war begins in your head- with one side trying to fight the urge to but in the end, the other wins and you convince yourself you need a pick me up. Suddenly- the apple on your desk looks less appealing. Before you know it, you are looking at the empty peanut chocolate bar wrapper on your desk. Almost as fast as you ate the bar, you feel guilty. Why does this happen?

Sugar stimulates the feel-good, stimulating hormone dopamine- which; for some can be chronically low and lead to sugar cravings. Other times, a more simplistic reason is to blame- dehydration. Your body sends signals to the brain for water, and the cravings can be misinterpreted for a sugar craving. Next time you are out to lunch and want dessert, check to see if you have consumed any water. If not, you may be surprised to see your craving disappears after a cool glass of water.

Here are some other reasons for craving sugar:

1: Emotional Eating: Do you ever eat when you are bored, or upset? We eat when we are happy at a celebration and when we are struck by a craving. Consider if what you are really craving is food, or if you are sad for example- if you really just need to talk or a hug. Paying attention to your physical and emotional needs and being in tune with what your body is really asking for is key.

2: Yin/Yang theory: Consider eating one food can cause you to crave another. For example, foods which are considered Yin foods are expansive foods like sugar, alcohol, white foods, milk, and foods like meat, cheese, eggs and salt are considered Yang foods, which are contractive. Eating these foods can cause a craving for another. Ever want something salty after you eat something sweet? Consider eating more neutral foods like fruits, vegetables, grains, poultry, fish, beans, and the like.

saladplate3: Seasonal Eating: Sometimes we crave foods because of the season. Up until the past couple 100 years, we ate seasonally. For example, if you lived in New York, odds are- you didn’t have pineapple in December like we have access to today. Consider we should eat more warming foods in the fall and winter like meats, squashes, and root vegetables, more greens in the spring and cooling, refreshing fruits like watermelon, peaches and plums in the summer. Eating according to Mother Nature’s unique schedule is not only cheaper, but tastier and better for your bodies overall needs.

Even if you think you don’t consume a lot of sugar, please evaluate your dietary intake carefully. In my book, The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: Using Whole Foods to Relieve Crohn’s Disease and Colitis, I reveal that the average American eats 142 lbs of sugar, per person, per year. That is someone’s entire body weight in sugar, or 70 lb boxes per person! Or put into daily perspective- the average American consumes about 20 teaspoons of sugar per day.

If you’re not sure how this is possible, consider we are accustomed to drinking our calories in coffee, juice, soda and sports beverages. We consume doughnuts for breakfast, rolls with processed meat for lunch, cake for dessert, the list goes on and on. Think about this is impacting our society. The fuel we put into our bodies surely plays a role in the auto immune disease pandemic we are seeing today. We have more and more people succumbing to preventable diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer than ever before. Most people today are not fortunate enough to report not knowing someone with any of these diseases. How can we stop the increase in these diseases? The answer is simple: eat less sugar, refined fats and meat and consume more whole, unprocessed foods.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article…..

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Why You Should Avoid Excess Sugar After Gastric Bypass Surgery

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Dr. Jeremy Korman

bellyAs we are well aware, obesity is a national epidemic. Even the U.S. government recognizes it as a disease. However, despite out awareness and the ample supply of “diet” foods on the market, the number of Americans who are overweight or obese is continuing to rise. Until recently, it was believed the consumption of high amounts of fat was the main factor responsible for the problem. Recent studies, however, show that sugar can be just as dangerous. The FDA considers pure sugar to be a safe food at the recommended level of consumption. The problem is that Americans are consuming two to three times the recommended amount and in various forms, such as high-fructose corn syrup. For example, about half of the population consumes sugary beverages on daily bases.

Nutrition scientist require the FDA to limit the amount of sugar is soft drinks

Soda manufacturers have taken steps to limit the amount of added sugar in their beverages. As a result about 45 percent of all non-alcoholic beverages purchased today have zero calories. Still, despite the industries self-regulation, in February 2013 the Center for Science in the Public Interest filed a petition with the FDA to regulate the amount of sugar allowed in soft drinks.

The petition is supported by 41 nutrition scientists who have shown that sugary beverages account for half the sugar we consume. High levels of fructose, corn syrup, sucrose and other added sugars can contribute to:

• type 2 diabetes
• hypertension
• heart disease
• gout
• sleep apnea
• variety of cancers

sodabottleOn the other hand soft drink producers argue that reducing the amount of sugar in their products is not going to solve America’s obesity problem. The measure would be truly effective if sugar restrictions would be applied also for cereals, baked goods, or other processed foods.

Sugar consumption after gastric bypass surgery

For morbidly obese individuals gastric bypass surgery is often their last resort after years of diet and exercise programs have failed. The surgical procedure is recommended only for individuals with a body mass index of 40 or greater. The procedure works by reducing the volume of the stomach and bypassing most of the stomach and the small intestines. The procedure is meant to help morbidly obese individuals to reduce their weight by eating less and absorbing fewer calories. Most patients, who follow their doctors’ advice, will lose 60 to 70 percent of their excess weight in one year following surgery. Although gastric bypass surgery has a high success rate, in order for the individual to lose weight and avoid gaining it back, adopting a new diet and making lifestyle changes is required.

Patients should consume nutritious foods in small amounts, and, of course, avoid consuming large amounts of sugar in any form. Aside from the health problems associated with excess sugar, gastric bypass patients have another concern. With bypass patients, sugary foods pass rapidly into the intestine resulting in a very unpleasant condition called the “dumping syndrome”. In its attempt to dilute the sugars the body will flood the intestines. The affected individual will experience symptoms similar to those of hypoglycemic reaction, including:

• increased heart rate
• cold sweat
• a feeling of butterflies in the stomach
• anxiety
• diarrhea

Dietary tips for gastric bypass patients

doctorEven before a gastric bypass surgery is performed, patients should discuss their new diet with their surgeon or nutritionist. The diet prescribed for each patient can be slightly different and it should be respected as prescribed. However some general advice applies to all patients:

• eat several small meals every day to avoid poor nutrition and inadequate calorie intake

• take small bites and eat slowly to avoid vomiting

• avoid drinking liquids for at least 30 minutes after every meal

• make sure to drink plenty of sugar free beverages, especially water

• make sure to consume fruits, vegetables every day

• make sure to have an adequate protein intake especially in the first months after surgery to allow proper healing

• avoid sweets, especially sweetened beverages, juice drinks, milkshakes, and ice cream

• take vitamin and mineral supplements to avoid deficiencies caused by mal absorption

Besides respecting these dietary tips performing regular physical exercise is also recommended as it is efficient not just for losing weight but also for increasing muscle tone and firmness.

Dr. Jeremy Korman – medical director and chief surgeon at L.A. Bariatrics, a bariatric program and surgery center of excellence within Marina Del Rey Hospital. Together with his team Dr. Korman helps patients overcome the obesity and other heal problems related to it by offering a wide range of bariatric surgery options including: gastric sleeve, gastric bypass, lap-band and gastric plication.

The Case For Drinking More Water

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watercupFrom Your Health Journal…..A very good article from the Dallas Morning News via AP entitled America’s consumption of drinking water outpaces old favorite soda. With obesity on the rise, and many people suffering from obesity related illness, it is refreshing to read how water has made a strong combat as the number one drink in the United States. Americans now drink around 44 gallons of soda a year, a 17 % drop from the peak in 1998. Over the same time, the average amount of water people drink has increased 38 % to about 58 gallons a year. Bottled water has led that growth, with consumption nearly doubling to 21 gallons a year. Soda has been blamed in many cases as a major contributor to obesity, although it really is a combination of many factors that contribute to the weight gain. Water, a non calorie beverage is an important contributor to good health, assisting with digestion, lubricating the body, removing toxins, and good for the skin. Please visit the Dallas Morning News web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

It wasn’t too long ago that America had a love affair with soda. Now, an old flame has the country’s heart.

As New York City grapples with the legality of a ban on the sale of large cups of soda and other sugary drinks at some businesses, one thing is clear: soda’s run as the nation’s beverage of choice has fizzled.

In its place? A favorite for much of history: Plain old H2O.

For more than two decades, soda was the No. 1 drink in the U.S. with per capita consumption peaking in 1998 at 54 gallons a year, according industry tracker Beverage Digest. Americans drank just 42 gallons a year of water at the time.

But over the years, as soda increasingly came under fire for fueling the nation’s rising obesity rates, water quietly rose to knock it off the top spot.

Americans now drink an average of 44 gallons of soda a year, a 17 percent drop from the peak in 1998. Over the same time, the average amount of water people drink has increased 38 percent to about 58 gallons a year. Bottled water has led that growth, with consumption nearly doubling to 21 gallons a year.

Stephen Ngo, a civil defense attorney, quit drinking soda a year ago when he started running triathlons, and wanted a healthier way to quench his thirst.

Ngo, 34, has a Brita filter for tap water and also keeps his pantry stocked with cases of bottled water.

“It might just be the placebo effect or marketing, but it tastes crisper,” said Ngo, who lives in Miami.

The trend reflects Americans’ ever-changing tastes; it wasn’t too far back in history that tap water was the top drink.

But in the 1980s, carbonated soft drinks overtook tap as the most popular drink, with Coca-Cola and PepsiCo putting their marketing muscle behind their colas with celebrity endorsements from the likes of pop star Michael Jackson and comedian Bill Cosby.

Americans kept drinking more of the carbonated, sugary drink for about a decade. Then, soda’s magic started to fade: Everyone from doctors to health advocates to government officials were blaming soft drinks for making people fat. Consumption started declining after hitting a high in the late 1990s.

At the same time, people started turning to bottled water as an alternative. Its popularity was helped by the emergence of single-serve bottles that were easy to carry around.

Until then, bottled water had mainly been sold in “big jugs and coolers” for people who didn’t trust their water supply, said John Sicher, publisher of Beverage Digest.

The new soft drink-like packaging helped fast-track bottled water’s growth past milk and beer. In fact, the amount of bottled water Americans drink has risen nearly every year for more than two decades, while the estimates of how much tap water people drink has fluctuated up and down during that time. When taken together, water finally overtook soda in 2008, according to Beverage Digest. (It’s difficult to track how much tap water people drink and how much is used for other things like washing dishes, so experts estimate consumption.)

To read the complete article…..Click here