What A Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease Means For Family Members

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publication….please share your thoughts below…..

seniorcitizenAn individual with a close relative with Alzheimer’s is at slightly higher risk for the disease. Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s risk genes is not generally helpful.

Alzheimer’s disease represents a personal health crisis, but it’s also a family concern. When someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, what does that mean in terms of the risk his or her children and siblings might face?

“People think that if their dad or aunt or uncle had Alzheimer’s disease, they are doomed, but that’s not true,” says Dr. Gad Marshall, assistant professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School. “Even though family history adds to the overall risk, age still usually trumps it quite a bit.”

Close relatives of someone who’s been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s have about a 30% higher chance of developing the disease themselves, according to the January 2016 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch. But it’s important to ask: “30% higher than what?”

A 65-year-old American’s annual chance of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s is about 2%. Having a relative with dementia raises that chance by around 30% — to 2.6%. “It means your risk is higher, but it’s not that much higher, if you consider the absolute numbers,” Dr. Marshall says.

Family members often wonder if they should be tested for the “Alzheimer’s gene,” called apolipoprotein E (also known as APOE4). The short answer is no. “Being tested for APOE4 is not going to be helpful, since it won’t tell you whether you will develop the disease,” Dr. Marshall says. “It will only tell you if you are at a greater or lower risk.”

Read the full-length article: “Alzheimer’s in the family”

Also in the January 2016 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

* How much meat in your diet is healthy?

* Four steps to prevent colon cancer

* Vitamins and vision

* What to do about knee pain

The Harvard Men’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Keeping Pregnant Mothers Safe From Blood Clots

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS). Please share your thoughts below…..

pregnantThe Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a podcast with Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC on keeping pregnant mothers safe from blood clots.

Preventing blood clots in pregnant mothers poses significant healthcare challenges. The risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers is almost ten times more likely than a non-pregnant woman. These patient safety risks increase for pregnant mothers who are obese. In the United States, more than two-thirds of adults are obese.

Because of the increased risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a podcast http://youtu.be/Um2BKewEWRg with Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC. Ms. Enslow is the Nurse Educator for the Women’s Health and Ambulatory Care Services at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut.

“Pregnant women are at a significantly higher risk than the general public for developing a blood clot simply because of the mechanisms that are in place to help them prevent hemorrhaging,” said Ms. Enslow. “So, our pregnant patients really need a lot more risk assessment during their hospitalization and even after discharge. If a blood clot is not detected or treated, it may become dislodged and travel up into the lung and that can create even more problems for the mom.”

In the podcast, Ms. Enslow discussed a case of a super morbidly obese pregnant mother. This mother had a BMI (body mass index) of 67. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal.

Four keys for managing the healthcare risk in obese pregnant mothers were identified during the podcast.

The first key – plan for the delivery.

Ms. Enslow explained the necessity of planning – “Pre-planning and communication between all of the team members is really key to achieving the most optimal clinical outcomes for patients with multiple challenging risk factors or individual characteristics. In specialties, such as obstetrics, we’re often faced with a complex patient that requires us to be really proactive and identifying risk factors early in the course of care. This type of preparedness is necessary to prevent adverse events and to identify individual risk factors that would best guide us in the management or plan for patients possible hospital acquired conditions or in adverse event prevention plans to achieve high quality outcomes.”

The second key – apply blood clot preventative measures.

Ms. Enslow described the measures taken in a case of super morbidly obese pregnant mother – “this patient fell into the high risk category for venous thromboembolism because of her multiple risk factors, including the high BMI, her gestational diabetes, her maternal age, or having a caesarean section. So, because of this, she was provided with sequential compression devices beginning in the operating room … [The sequential compression devices] stayed on throughout the recovery period in our PACU and also when the patient was transferred to the postpartum unit … We started chemical prophylaxis six hours following surgery for her and that was continued throughout her stay.”

The third key – preventing blood clots doesn’t stop when the mother leaves the hospital.

Ms. Enslow emphasized the importance of preventative measures when the mother returns to her home – “it’s important to remember that the commitment to prevent VTE doesn’t end when the patient is discharged. That’s why appropriate patient education is so important to help patients understand why they should comply with their care, with making sure they understand that they really need to continue taking their discharge medications. Our post-partum patients can get the sequential compression devices for use at home and need to keep all their follow-up appointments.”

The fourth key – use the OB VTE Safety Recommendations.

The OB VTE Safety Recommendation s were developed with the advice and counsel of a panel of experts brought together by the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety. They provide four concise steps that:

* Assess patients for VTE risk with an easy-to-use automated scoring system

* Provide the recommended prophylaxis regimen, depending on whether the mother is antepartum or postpartum.

* Reassess the patient every 24 hours or upon the occurrence of a significant event, like surgery.

* Ensure that the mother is provided appropriate VTE prevention education upon hospital discharge.

“Caring for Mrs M. was significantly helped by the guidance from the recently released OB VTE Safety Recommendations, which offers a fine clinical process that covers the entire continuum of care,” said Ms. Enslow.

The OB VTE Safety Recommendations are a free resource available on the PPAHS website – http://www.ppahs.org

The podcast was hosted by Pat Iyer, MSN, RN, LNCC. Ms. Iyer is a legal nurse consultant who provides education to healthcare providers about patient safety at http://www.patiyer.com.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org

Weekend Warriors: Watch Your Back

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Dr. Brian Bannister with Atlantic Spine Center. Please share your thoughts below…..

newsPain Management Specialist Dr. Brian Bannister with Atlantic Spine Center explains common injuries weekend warriors experience and offers tips for prevention.

Spring’s imminent arrival – despite frigid temperatures over much of the United States – undoubtedly has many “weekend warriors” itching to return to outdoor exercise and activities. But weekend warriors – who take part in strenuous bursts of activity only on weekends or certain times of the year – need to be especially cautious of how an abrupt return to vigorous movement can injure their spine, according to Pain Management Specialist Brian Bannister, MD, with Atlantic Spine Center.

Despite minimal activity during the week, weekend warriors often plunge into recreational sports at week’s end, sometimes with perilous results. A 2014 study in the Canadian Journal of Surgery (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4035407/) found that significantly more weekend warriors sustained injuries than everyday athletes during mishaps while hiking or rock-climbing (15.4% of accidents), skateboarding or rollerblading (12.3%), hockey/ice skating (10.3%) and water-related (7.7%) activities. About 35% of the 351 patients analyzed in the research sustained a spinal injury, and more than 8% required spinal surgery.

“Overall, a weekend warrior’s commitment to demanding exercise is a good thing, health-wise,” says Dr. Bannister. “But it can also place their backs, in particular, at risk since their bodies are no longer as flexible or quick to recover as when they were younger.”

Common spine injuries for weekend warriors

What types of back injuries are prevalent among weekend warriors? Depending on how they get hurt, these injuries can run the gamut from mild to severe, Dr. Bannister says, including:

* Muscle strain or sprain: This type of soft tissue damage – whether to muscles, tendons or ligaments – often occurs in the lower spine, known as the lumbar region. Muscle spasms may accompany pain and can be severe, but most strains and sprains just need time and rest to heal.

* Disc herniation: Athletes engaging in activities requiring a lot of spine flexing and rotating – such as weight lifting, collision sports and bowling – have a higher chance of disc herniation, in which the soft center of a vertebral disc pushes through the disc’s outer shell. Pain can be intense and the condition may require surgery.

* Spondylolistheses: When one bone in the back slides forward over the bone beneath it, that’s called spondylolistheses. Some sports, such as weight lifting and gymnastics, confer a higher risk of this problem by causing stress fractures in vertebrae. Pain relievers, physical therapy or surgery may be used to treat spondylolistheses.

* Minor or major fracture: Major spinal fractures are uncommon except in high-speed collision sports such as skiing or motocross and typically require surgery. But small fractures, which can happen during a variety of activities, are usually managed with “conservative” measures such as rest, physical therapy and pain medication.

Tips for back injury prevention

What’s the best way for weekend warriors to prevent back injuries? “That’s easy,” Dr. Bannister says. “Stop exercising only on the weekend! Moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise should be something we take part in at least several times per week, spread throughout the week.”

But for those committed to their weekend warrior ways, Dr. Bannister offers these tips to help prevent spine injury:

* Start slowly: Stretch and walk for 7 to 10 minutes to allow muscles and joints to warm up. Hold each stretch for at least 30 seconds, and be sure to stretch the opposing muscle group on the other side of your body.

* Ramp up gradually: Increase the time or intensity of workouts, but not both at the same time.

* Mix it up: Try cross-training, which involves participating in more than one type of sport or activity. Research suggests this approach results in fewer injuries than doing only one specific activity.

* Listen to your body: If you feel pain or soreness, stop what you’re doing and take a rest. If the discomfort doesn’t gradually improve – or gets worse – see your doctor.

* Remember the right gear: Depending on the sport, you may need a helmet, wrist pads or knee pads. Well-fitting athletic shoes that provide sufficient shock absorption are a must.

“Here’s what I propose to weekend warriors: Make physical activity an every-other-day habit instead,” says Dr. Bannister. “Not only will short workouts during the week help you enjoy your weekend workouts even more, but your back will thank you.”

Atlantic Spine Center is a nationally recognized leader for endoscopic spine surgery with three locations in New Jersey in West Orange, Edison and Union. http://www.atlanticspinecenter.com

Brian Bannister, M.D., is an anesthesiologist and pain management specialist. He works with both surgical and chronic care patients, performing evaluations of new patients and implementing follow-up care and continued therapy for patients with acute or chronic pain using effective interventional pain therapy and procedures.

Concussion Tests Are Essential For Student Athletes

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

didyouknow?Concussions are one of the most common and most difficult sports injuries to manage. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 1.6 million and 3.8 million brain injuries occur in sports each year, with around 63,000 affecting high school athletes. With recent advances in neuroscience, sports medicine clinicians are discovering new and better methods to protect brain health.

Sports concussion experts agree that the diagnosis of acute concussion usually involves the assessment of a range of domains, including clinical symptoms, physical signs, behavior, balance, sleep and cognition. The Medicine in Motion team uses special computerized testing to evaluate whether an athlete is suffering from a concussion. This tool, in combination with a physician evaluation, is the best way to determine the presence of a concussion and when it is resolved, thereby allowing an athlete to return to play.

“The absolute best way to manage concussions is to have baseline testing prior to the start of a sports season,” said Dr. Martha Pyron, Austin sports medicine doctor and owner of Medicine in Motion. “If a head injury does occur, we then repeat the test for comparison. By doing this, there is a unique and direct comparison from healthy brain to concussion for the clinician to evaluate.”

When to use concussion testing?

1. Athletes involved in contact sports (such as football) should have a baseline test before the season begins.

2. Athletes incurring an injury should be evaluated, regardless of whether or not they received a baseline test.

3. Anyone who has had repeated concussions in the past should be tested to determine the possibility of any long term complications.

4. Non-sports participants that receive head injuries should also be tested to evaluate cognitive abilities.

5. Parents of athletes should have their children baseline tested every other year until they reach adulthood to ensure their brains are protected.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

How To Get At The Roots Of Memory Slips

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Interesting topic from June from PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your thoughts below…..

brainA variety of factors can contribute to general forgetfulness. They include poor health, medications, sleeplessness, lack of exercise, stress, depression, and alcohol use.

Age-related forgetfulness, although annoying, is common and essentially harmless. Nevertheless, pinpointing its exact cause isn’t always easy. But according to the June 2015 Harvard Men’s Health Watch, asking some simple questions can reveal some of the reversible causes of memory problems and provide the basis for a helpful conversation with a doctor.

“Having an honest discussion about memory and getting tested may help open up discussions about other areas of health too,” says Dr. David Hsu, a geriatric psychiatrist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

After middle age, many people start to worry that simple forgetfulness may be the harbinger of Alzheimer’s disease. But sometimes the causes are more mundane. They include fatigue from an unrecognized medical condition, the effects of sedating medications, lack of good-quality sleep or regular exercise, and the effects of chronic stress.

Dr. Hsu notes that a perceived change in memory performance may simply be due to a slight slowdown in thinking speed that comes with aging. “Remembering takes a little more time, but this is entirely normal,” Dr. Hsu says. Getting frustrated with memory slips won’t make them stop; actually, it could make it harder to remember things.

Read the full-length article: “What’s causing your memory slips?”

Also in the June 2015 Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

* Yoga for men

* Who should be tested for an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

* Weight gain and heartburn

Early Detection For Arthritis

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

legslotionDr. John D. Tomasin, MD, a Northern California Medical Associates (NCMA) Orthopedic Surgeon discusses living with arthritis, exploring the latest research on the care of arthritis and explains when total-joint-replacement is necessary.

Research, led by the University of Warwick in the UK published recently in the journal Scientific Reports reveals that the first blood test for detection of early-stage osteoarthritis could soon be developed. Researchers who say that the biomarker they identified in the study makes it possible to detect the painful joint condition before bone and joint damage becomes obvious.Dr. John Tomasin, NCMA Orthopedic Surgeon, points out that this development will help to bring treatment for arthritis to patients when it could actually have the greatest impact; in the early stages of the disease.

Researchers suggest that this discovery raises the potential of a blood test that can help diagnose the most common forms of arthritis, RA and OA — as much as several years before the onset of physical symptoms. “With this sort of advanced warning orthopedic physicians would be able to manage and treat symptoms well before the disease reaches its more painful state and starts to become degenerative,” Tomasin says.

The sooner the diagnosis, the better — as most types of arthritis can be managed fairly well, and the pain and disability minimized when caught in the early stages. While it may be some time before advance detection is available by way of a blood test, treating arthritis as symptoms arise and knowing when to make an appointment with an orthopedic specialist will help to give patients a better outlook on living with arthritis.

Common Forms of Arthritis

It may surprise some people to learn that arthritis is the nation’s most common cause of disability affecting an estimated 52.5 million adults in the U.S; that figure translates to about 1 of 5 adults currently living with some form of arthritis. According to the Center for Disease Control, as the U.S. population continues to age, the number of adults with arthritis is expected to increase to a whopping 67 million by 2030.

Arthritis is most commonly diagnosed in adults 65 years or older but people of all ages – including children, can be affected. It tends to affect women more than men (26 to 19 percent respectively) of all racial and ethnic groups. Arthritis is thought to be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. More than 100 different category of rheumatic diseases and conditions exist under the umbrella of an arthritis diagnosis; the most common being osteoarthritis which usually develops are part of the aging process, and most often affects the fingers, knees and hips. Other forms of arthritis that occur includes:

* rheumatoid arthritis

* lupus

* gout, pseudo gout

Arthritis is also more commonly diagnosed among adults who have issues of obesity, and is less likely to appear in those who maintain a healthy weight. There is no known cure for arthritis, but there are many treatments that can help slow down the condition and provide some relief. Symptoms universally include pain, aching, stiffness and swelling in or around the joints. Certain forms of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, have been known to affect organs and cause pervasive symptoms throughout the body.

How Is Arthritis Treated?

Arthritis treatments are aimed at providing pain relief by controlling inflammation and increasing joint mobility. “Early, aggressive treatment is particularly important for rheumatoid arthritis in order to help prevent further damage and disability down the road,” explains Dr. Tomasin. Common treatment options may include medication, an exercise regime specific to the condition, application of heat or cold compresses and use of joint protection. When these methods fail to provide relief surgery may be considered.

When it’s time for Total Join Replacement

Total joint replacement is a surgical procedure where aspects of an arthritic or damaged joint are removed and replaced with prosthesis. This type of prosthesis is constructed from plastic, ceramic or metal and is designed to perfectly replicate the movement of a normal, healthy joint.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons the vast majority of patients report a significant decrease in pain following total joint replacement surgery; up to 90 percent of all patients. “Most patients quickly return to normal daily activities and are usually able to continue to stay active for years to come,” says Dr. Tomasin. “In many cases, following total joint replacement surgery we see our patients resume activities they enjoyed prior to being diagnosed with arthritis.”

A variety of conditions can cause joint pain and disability that lead patients to consider joint replacement surgery including damage to the cartilage that lines the ends of the bones called ‘articular cartilage’ usually due to arthritis, a fracture, trauma or some other condition.

It is reported that about 1 million total joint replacements were performed in the United States as if 2011. The most common type of joint replacement is hip and knee but replacement surgery can also be successfully performed on the ankle, wrist, elbow and shoulder.

About Dr. Tomasin

Dr. John D. Tomasin attended medical school at the University of California, Davis-School of Medicine, and completed his residency at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the Scottish Rite Hospital for Crippled Children in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Tomasin completed his Sports Medicine Fellowship at Hughston Sports Medicine Clinic in Columbus, GA, as well as an AO Fellowship in Munich, West Germany. Dr. Tomasin has been published in numerous professional medical journals, including Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Journal of Orthopedic Trauma, and The Physician and Sports Medicine. Dr. Tomasin has been the team physician for numerous high school athletic programs, including Healdsburg High School and Cardinal Newman High School. He is also been the acting medical consultant for the Northern California Rugby Football Union, and the team physician for the Santa Rosa Rugby Club. Dr. Tomasin is committed to the health of the Sonoma County community, and he has been in practice in Healdsburg since 1988. To learn more visit our website or call 707-4330-0126 for an appointment.

Resources:

First blood test for osteoarthritis could soon be available – http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150320091317.htm

Arthritis: The Nation’s Most Common Cause of Disability – http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/arthritis.htm

Arthritis Basics – http://www.webmd.com/osteoarthritis/guide/arthritis-basics?page=3#1

Arthritis Foundation – http://www.arthritistoday.org/

Living With Arthritis: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family – http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Arthritis/default.asp

Interval Training Helps Build Cardiovascular Fitness

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Courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your thoughts below…..

weightsInterval training means alternating between short bursts of intense exercise and brief periods of rest or less-intense activity. It builds cardiovascular fitness, but it does require exercisers to push their personal limit.

Wondering whether interval training is the best way to enhance your workout? Interval training simply means alternating between short bursts of intense exercise and brief periods of rest (or less-intense activity). The payoff is improved cardiovascular fitness.

“Aerobic or cardiovascular training is designed to develop a healthier heart and circulatory system,” explains Howard Knuttgen, research associate in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard-affiliated Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, in the September 2015 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch. “Some regimen of aerobic training is really essential to good health.”

Interval training requires the person to exercise for very brief periods at a higher intensity or velocity than he or she could otherwise sustain for five to 10 minutes before becoming exhausted, Knuttgen says. Here are a few ways to turn a typical moderate-intensity workout into a session of interval training:

Swimming. Swim one lap as fast as possible. Rest for about the same time as it took to swim the lap. Repeat.

Walking. Walk as fast as possible for a minute or two. Then walk at a leisurely pace for the same period. Repeat.

Gym machines. Treadmills, elliptical trainers, and stationary bicycles often have a built-in interval training function to put gym-goers through their paces.

Read the full-length article: “Interval training for a stronger heart”

Also in the September 2015 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

* How to lower blood pressure without more pills

* The truth about how much water you need every day

* New guidance on how to overcome spine-related back pain

* Influenza vaccination tips

The Harvard Men’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Media: Contact Kristen Rapoza for a complimentary copy of the newsletter, or to receive our press releases directly.

New Study Shows Combatting Childhood Obesity In Schools Is Working

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

obesityResearch Finds the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program Reduces Prevalence of Childhood Obesity.

According to a recently published study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal, Preventing Chronic Disease, schools can win the fight against childhood obesity. The study found that the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program is an important means of supporting schools in reducing students’ rates of obesity.

Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in California Schools, 2006 – 2012, is the first peer-reviewed journal article published about the Healthy Schools Program’s impact on child obesity rates.

An analysis of 281 schools in California that participated in the Program from 2006-2012 concludes that the Program is “an effective model for addressing childhood obesity among engaged schools,” and that meaningful participation in the Program is linked to reductions in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among students in high-need schools.

Ten years ago, the Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association founded the Alliance for a Healthier Generation with the goal of reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity, and this study confirms the organization is delivering on its mission and that healthy school environments are having an effect on student weight.

“It’s encouraging to see the proven positive impact of the Healthy Schools Program on childhood obesity. Over the past ten years, the Alliance involved all stakeholders ‒ schools, companies, communities, healthcare professionals and families. The combination of commitment and cooperation has made the difference,” said President Bill Clinton.

kidsexercisevector“This study is evidence of our 2005 dream realized. While we know we have much more work to do to reverse the tide of obesity, we’re showing signs of success through the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.

The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program, which was launched in 2006 with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provides schools with a framework, assessment and action plan, as well as virtual and onsite training and technical assistance and access to national experts to help them create sustainable healthy change. While the study looked at schools in California, the Program serves more than 29,000 schools nationally, the majority of which are high-need ‒ 40% or more of a school’s students receive free or reduced price lunch.

The study demonstrates the power of providing high-quality training and technical assistance to help schools make policy and system changes that improve children’s access to healthy foods and physical activity. The more that schools engaged with the Healthy Schools Program, and the longer they engaged, the greater reductions they saw in student rates of obesity. For example, for each additional year of exposure to an Alliance national advisor, schools saw a nearly 2% decline in student rates of overweight and obesity.

“Healthy school environments are critical to ensuring that every child grows up at a healthy weight and to RWJF’s goal of building a nationwide Culture of Health,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “This study reinforces the critical role that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program can play in making a healthy school the norm and not the exception in the United States. We are proud of our commitment to initiate and expand the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program over the past decade, and we look forward to continued progress in our joint efforts to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic.”

“We’re pleased the findings confirm that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program is delivering on our mission: to reduce the prevalence of childhood obesity,” said Dr. Howell Wechsler, CEO of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. “Reaching more than 17 million students across the country and growing, we will continue to positively impact children’s health on a national scale.”

About the Alliance for a Healthier Generation
The Alliance for a Healthier Generation empowers kids to develop lifelong, healthy habits. Through our Healthy Schools Program, we help to build healthier school environments for more than 17 million students by improving physical education, health education, child nutrition, and staff wellness policies and programs in more than 29,000 schools. Learn more and join the movement at http://www.healthiergeneration.org.

About the Clinton Foundation
The Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change. Because of our work, more than 29,000 American schools are providing kids with healthy food choices in an effort to eradicate childhood obesity; more than 85,000 farmers in Malawi, Rwanda, and Tanzania are benefiting from climate-smart agronomic training, higher yields, and increased market access; more than 33,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions are being reduced annually across the United States; over 350,000 people have been impacted through market opportunities created by social enterprises in Latin America, the Caribbean, and South Asia; through the independent Clinton Health Access Initiative, 9.9 million people in more than 70 countries have access to CHAI-negotiated prices for HIV/AIDS medications; 75 million people are benefiting from disease prevention efforts and investments in the U.S.; and members of the Clinton Global Initiative community have made more than 3,200 Commitments to Action, which have improved the lives of over 430 million people in more than 180 countries. Learn more at http://www.clintonfoundation.org, on Facebook at Facebook.com/ClintonFoundation and on Twitter @ClintonFdn.

About the American Heart Association
The American Heart Association (AHA) is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke—America’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers. The American Heart Association team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of the offices around the country.

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
For more than 40 years the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has worked to improve health and health care. The Foundation strives to build a national Culture of Health that will enable all to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come. For more information, visit http://www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter at http://www.rwjf.org/twitter or on Facebook at http://www.rwjf.org/facebook.

Association Between Chronic Pain And Obesity

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

obesityThe literature suggests that obesity and pain are significant co-morbidities, adversely impacting each other. The nature of the relationship however is not likely to be direct, and many interacting factors appear to contribute.

The Journal of Pain Research has published the review “The Association between Chronic Pain and Obesity”.

As corresponding author Professor Akiko Okifuji says “Both obesity and chronic pain are serious public health concerns in our society. They also co-occur often, although it is not to say that one causes the other. Rather, there appear to be multiple factors that contribute to each of these conditions. It is clear though that when they do co-occur, the adverse impact of the problems is much worse than each of them alone. Treating each of these conditions can be challenging; obesity further complicates the treatment of chronic pain and vice versa.”

Professor Okifuji continues “Our paper highlights the significance of the relationship and need for further research. Further clinical research evaluating the nature of the relationship is urgently needed in order for us to develop innovative and optimal therapies to address the comorbidity of pain and obesity.”

As Dr. Michael Schatman, Editor-in-Chief, explains “This paper represents an important contribution to the literature, given the increasing rates of obesity as well as the stigmatization of obese pain sufferers.”

The Journal of Pain Research is an international, peer-reviewed, open access, online journal that welcomes laboratory and clinical findings in the fields of pain research and the prevention and management of pain.

Dove Medical Press Ltd is a privately held company specializing in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology and especially medicine.

Hard Truths Of Fighting Fat

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Beverly Hills Physicians…..please share your comments below as weight loss surgery has always been a controversial topic. According to WebMD, you may be a candidate for weight loss surgery if:

* You’re an obese adult, especially if you have a weight-related condition, such as type 2 diabetes.

* You know the risks and benefits.

* You’re ready to adjust how you eat after the surgery.

* You’re committed to making lifestyle changes to keep the weight off.

Ultimately, this sensitive topic should be discussed with your physician to see if it is the right move for you.

weightlossballtextSouthern California based medical group Beverly Hills Physicians (BHP) sees a great many patients exploring weight loss surgery as well as non-surgical paths to weight loss, and they typically experience a surge of interest from prospective patients with the beginning of every new year. A Las Vegas Sun article published December 27 notes that people who truly want to lose weight must think beyond quick-fix diets and unsustainable exercise plans if they actually want to make their dreams of becoming permanently thinner and healthier a reality, and that the only path to success is permanent lifestyle change. BHP agrees, but adds that weight loss surgery and other techniques can make dealing with the hard truths of weight loss a great deal easier.

BHP explains that, while weight loss fads typically produce only the most minor and short-lived results, even individuals who set out to make genuine lifestyle changes have an extremely difficult challenge before them. These people are often able to achieve some loss of weight, at least at first. One problem identified by BHP is that, over time, strong desires to overeat actually become all that much stronger the more weight an individual loses – and that means severely obese patients who have the most weight to lose, and the greatest need to lose it, have the hardest task before them. For most, the medical group notes, the constant pangs of appetite are simply too difficult to ignore over the long term.

BHP notes that there is a preponderance of evidence supporting the fact that weight loss surgery options such as the gastric sleeve and Lap Band can make permanently defeating obesity a great deal more achievable because they get to the root of the problem by actually reducing the patient’s appetite. Doctors have found that both of these procedures make it uncomfortable to overeat, while the sleeve procedure – which removes roughly 75 to 85% of the stomach – may also have some added benefits in terms of reducing the body’s production of hunger-stimulating hormones.

Of course, the medical group adds, a great many individuals with weight issues may not meet the definition of severe obesity (a BMI of 40 or more, or 35 or more with related health problems). For them, BHP offers both non-surgical assistance in the form of coaching and medical monitoring, as well as the new Obera balloon weight loss system. They explain that the latter is a temporary procedure which reduces the stomach’s capacity, but is intended for individuals whose weight may be a health issue but who may not be sufficiently obese to be candidates for the other weight loss procedures.

However it is accomplished, experts agree that real weight loss that lasts takes time and commitment – but that doesn’t mean that the challenge can’t be made significantly less difficult with the help of outstanding medical professionals like the team at BHP. To learn more about their options, interested readers can call 800-788-1416, or visit BHP online at http://www.BeverlyHillsPhysicians.com.