ACSM Publishes Science Behind The Updated Physical Activity Guidelines For Americans

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From The American College of Sports Medicine…..

joggersThe American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) today published a collection of 14 new pronouncements that present the science behind the updated Physical Activity Guidelines released in November 2018. Authored primarily by ACSM subject matter experts, each pronouncement addresses a specific topic, sharing the scientific evidence and identifying key knowledge gaps for future research to address. The “Scientific Pronouncements: Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd Edition” collection is published in ACSM’s flagship research journal, Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®.

“Publishing these papers aligns with ACSM’s mission to advance and integrate scientific research to improve education and the practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine. It also gives us an opportunity to highlight the innovative research and collaboration of our members,” said ACSM President-elect and Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee member William E. Kraus, M.D., FACSM. “While the Physical Activity Guidelines rightfully receive a great deal of attention, the research evidence underlying them doesn’t. The translated research will help people worldwide be more active, combat chronic disease and ultimately live longer, healthier lives.”

Authors used best practice methodology to conduct the scientific reviews. This is a multistep process that includes identifying specific questions to answer, developing criteria, conducting systematic searches, reviewing evidence, assessing quality and composing a comprehensive summary. The steps mirror what ACSM uses to develop its own position stands and newer umbrella reviews. This methodology ensures the reviews accurately represent the science and reflect the current state of knowledge.

Topics addressed in the pronouncements range from the relationships between physical activity and health outcomes like cancer, cognition, hypertension, pregnancy and aging to specific physical activity metrics like daily step counts, activity bout duration and high intensity interval training (HIIT).

Health care and fitness professionals as well as basic and applied scientists can use the pronouncements to identify gaps in literature and plan future research projects. They can also cite the pronouncements as current evidence in research papers and grant applications. Additionally, the information can inform the development and delivery of effective interventions.

seniorjogger“ACSM is thrilled to bring these noteworthy papers together in one collection that is freely available for members and the public,” added Kraus. “Having all of the papers in one place provides health care and fitness professionals, as well as basic and applied scientists, with the information they need for day-to-day work with clients, teaching students or with patients in a clinical setting.”

In addition to the U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report—Introduction, titles included in the ACSM Scientific Pronouncements: Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans collection are:

  • Daily Step Counts for Measuring Physical Activity Exposure and Its Relation to Health
  • Association between Bout Duration of Physical Activity and Health: Systematic Review
  • High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) for Cardiometabolic Disease Prevention
  • Sedentary Behavior and Health: Update from the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee
  • Physical Activity, Cognition and Brain Outcomes: A Review of the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines
  • Physical Activity in Cancer Prevention and Survival: A Systematic Review
  • Physical Activity and the Prevention of Weight Gain in Adults: A Systematic Review
  • Physical Activity, All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality, and Cardiovascular Disease
  • Physical Activity and Health in Children under 6 Years of Age: A Systematic Review
  • The Benefits of Physical Activity during Pregnancy and Postpartum: An Umbrella Review
  • Physical Activity, Injurious Falls and Physical Function in Aging: An Umbrella Review
  • Physical Activity to Prevent and Treat Hypertension: A Systematic Review
  • Effects of Physical Activity in Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Umbrella Review
  • Physical Activity Promotion: Highlights from the 2018 PAGAC Systematic Review

View and download the collection of scientific pronouncements at www.acsm.org/pagpros2019.

About the American College of Sports Medicine
The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 50,000 international, national and regional members are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to improve educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine. More details can be found at www.acsm.org.

7 Astounding Ways Your Mattress Affects Your Health And Sleep

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By Cindy Walker

SleepingWomanMost people don’t feel the significance of the best mattresses for their good night sleep and don’t find its importance in their well-being in their daily lives.  As it is a known fact that, every individual, in general, spend 1/3rd of their lives sleeping so there should be a huge impact on your sleep if you do not sleep on a comfortable mattress isn’t it. That is why it is important to consider purchasing the comfortable mattress to avoid the surprising ways of mattress affect your health and sleep.

You should consider three elements to a healthy life, including Exercise, Sleep, and Diet. One of the main reasons for poor sleep is your poor mattress. It’s a fact that when you didn’t get proper sleep, then it gets even more difficult to exercise and the entire day seems to be dull and inactive. That is why you should invest in a good mattress and only a few people recognize the significance of investing in a good mattress.  If you ask who are at risk, Well, the people who do not get at least seven hours of good sleep are at risk of bigger health issues.

The seven surprising ways that a mattress affects your sleep and health includes:

  1. Stress:

Poor sleeping habits lead to higher stress levels. Today, many people suffer from higher stress levels because of poor sleep and it is due to using the poor or old mattress. Currently, you can find the most advanced technology used in designing the high-quality mattress that can easily reduce your stress levels. That is why it is important to replace your old mattress with the new one, especially if your mattress is more than eight-years-old.

  1. Allergies:

If you are using your mattress for a longer period, then it will become a breeding area for various micro-organisms, which can cause allergies. Sometimes, these dust mites can become a serious health threat. You should always clean your mattress frequently, also, replace your old mattress with the new one if you are suffering from runny nose or a sore throat.

  1. Back Pain:

Do not go for ultra-plush mattress as it is not suggestible for your posture, it may cause an abnormal bend in your lower back. You should always check the mattress before buying it and check if it is giving proper neck and spine alignment.

  1. Constant Fatigue:

sleepIf you are feeling unexcited and exhausted even after sleeping for eight hours continuously, then it is so clear that, it is the issue of the poor mattress.  Also, when the mattress gets old, it directly affects the quality of sleep.

  1. Wear & Tear:

If you feel lumps on the mattress or you might be having back pain because of the torn mattress spring. It is the right time to buy a new mattress with advanced technology.

  1. Creaking:

If you hear a creaking sound, then that means the springs may not be working properly and it make creaking nose when you move or toss and turn on the mattress.

  1. Insomnia:

It is a fact that a good night sleep can be obtained with a good quality mattress and it is a very important factor to consider if you are suffering from Insomnia. The only solution to prevent this is buying new mattress.

Arlington, Va. Is #1 ‘Fittest City’

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Submitted by The American College of Sports Medicine….

didyouknow?2019 American Fitness Index Ranks 100 Cities;
New Indicators Reveal Concerns About Pedestrian Safety and Air Quality

Indianapolis (May 14, 2019) – Arlington, Va. has earned the title of “America’s Fittest City” in the annual American Fitness Index® ranking published by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc.

The ACSM/Anthem Fitness Index evaluated America’s 100 largest cities using 33 health behaviors, chronic diseases and community infrastructure indicators. Rounding out the top 10 cities were Seattle, Wash.; Minneapolis, Minn.; San Francisco, Calif.; Madison, Wis.; Washington, D.C.; St. Paul, Minn.; Irvine, Calif. (new to the top 10); Denver, Colo.; and Portland, Ore. You can access the full rankings and scores, summary report, city comparison tool and other insights on the American Fitness Index website.

Setting the standard for other cities, Arlington’s balance of healthy behaviors and community infrastructure earned it the #1 overall rank. Arlington ranked in the top 10 for 22 of the 33 indicators in the ACSM/Anthem Fitness Index, with six indicators ranked #1, including residents exercising in the last month; meeting aerobic and strength activity guidelines; reporting good or excellent health; and having low rates of smoking, poor physical health and pedestrian fatalities. You can compare your city to Arlington or others ranked in the Index by accessing the online City Comparison Tool.

“Our research-backed Fitness Index rankings reveal both personal health habits within a community and how well those communities encourage fitness among their residents. It’s one more way we are working to improve the lives of our communities in which we live and work every day,” said Stephen Friedhoff, M.D., chief clinical officer for Anthem. “For example, we added new social determinant of health indicators to this year’s report and learned that some cities have work to do in the areas of pedestrian safety and air quality, which are both critical to overall wellness. Four of the 10 worst cities for pedestrian fatalities are in Florida, and we know air pollution rivals car accidents and tobacco when it comes to causing deaths.”

At the community level, the ACSM/Anthem Fitness Index is used as an assessment and evaluation tool to educate community leaders on the importance of key indicators of physical activity. Leaders can then focus on policy, systems and environmental change strategies that are evidence-based and create sustainability for their community. ACSM and Anthem agree that the Fitness Index provides cities with the data and resources needed to drive healthy change.

familyfun“We challenge city leaders, regardless of where their community ranks on the ACSM/Anthem Fitness Index, to take bold and decisive action toward building and maintaining infrastructures that promote fitness,” said Barbara Ainsworth, Ph.D., chair of the American Fitness Index Board and a regents’ professor in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University.

“Chronic diseases, sedentary lifestyles and pedestrian fatalities are at critical levels in our country, and city leadership can effectively address each of these challenges by becoming a fit city,” Ainsworth added.

Additional findings from the 2019 Fitness Index rankings included:

  • 2.2 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 residents on average across all 100 cities with the worst city, St. Louis, reporting 5.8 pedestrian deaths per 100,000.
  • Nearly half of the 10 deadliest cities for pedestrians are located in Florida: Tampa, Orlando, Jacksonville and St. Petersburgh.
  • The 21 worst cities for air quality are in California, Arizona and Nevada.
  • Cities have poor air quality an average 38.3 percent of the year.
  • 75.2 percent of adults in all cities were physically active in the previous month on average, with only 51.2 percent meeting aerobic activity guidelines and 22 percent meeting both aerobic and strength guidelines.
  • 97 percent of residents in the top 10 cities are located within a 10-minute walk to a park, but only 66.4 percent are within a 10-minute walk of a park in all 100 cities.
  • An average of 30.3 percent of residents in all 100 cities were diagnosed with high blood pressure, 3.3 percent with heart disease and 2.9 percent were diagnosed with a stroke.
  • Only 4.5 percent of residents in all 100 cities walk or bike to work, and 7.1 percent use public transportation to and from work.

The 2019 ACSM American Fitness Index rankings are as follows:

Overall Rank City State Overall Score
1 Arlington VA 87.3
2 Seattle WA 77.9
3 Minneapolis MN 76.4
4 San Francisco CA 75.7
5 Madison WI 75.3
6 Washington D.C. 75.1
7 St. Paul MN 69.5
8 Irvine CA 69.4
9 Denver CO 68.4
10 Portland OR 67.8
11 Oakland CA 67.7
12 San Jose CA 67.4
13 Boise ID 66.7
14 San Diego CA 66.7
15 Chicago IL 66.2
16 Pittsburgh PA 66
17 Lincoln NE 63.2
18 Long Beach CA 62.5
19 Boston MA 62.5
20 Sacramento CA 61.9
21 St. Petersburg FL 61.6
22 Atlanta GA 61.2
23 Virginia Beach VA 60.4
24 Santa Ana CA 60
25 Milwaukee WI 59.7
26 Honolulu HI 59.5
27 Los Angeles CA 59
28 Durham NC 58.2
29 Chula Vista CA 58.2
30 Raleigh NC 57.7
31 Albuquerque NM 57.5
32 New York NY 57.3
33 Stockton CA 56.9
34 Fremont CA 56.8
35 Miami FL 56.6
36 Newark NJ 56.3
37 Anaheim CA 56.1
38 Richmond VA 55.7
39 Colorado Springs CO 55.7
40 Aurora CO 55.1
41.5 Orlando FL 54.5
41.5 Buffalo NY 54.5
43 Austin TX 54
44 Plano TX 53.2
45 Omaha NE 52.7
46 Tampa FL 52.3
47 Norfolk VA 52.2
48 Nashville TN 51.3
49 Reno NV 50.9
50 Jersey City NJ 50.9
51 St. Louis MO 50.5
52 Baltimore MD 50.4
53 Tucson AZ 49.7
54 New Orleans LA 49.3
55 Hialeah FL 49.1
56 Greensboro NC 48.2
57 Cincinnati OH 47.9
58 Riverside CA 47.6
59 Glendale AZ 47.5
60 Lubbock TX 47.4
61 Dallas TX 47.4
62 Anchorage AK 46.5
63 Philadelphia PA 46.5
64 Fresno CA 46.2
65 Cleveland OH 45.9
66 Mesa AZ 44.3
67 Kansas City MO 43.6
68 Chandler AZ 43.3
69 Scottsdale AZ 43
70 Columbus OH 42.6
71 Phoenix AZ 41.9
72 El Paso TX 41.8
73 Houston TX 41.5
74 Lexington KY 41.2
75 Charlotte NC 41.1
76 Garland TX 40
77 Jacksonville FL 39.4
78 Irving TX 39
79 Baton Rouge LA 38.5
80 Laredo TX 37.9
81 Winston-Salem NC 37.4
82 San Antonio TX 36.3
83 Gilbert AZ 36.3
84 Chesapeake VA 35.8
85 Las Vegas NV 34.3
86 Fort Wayne IN 34.3
87 Memphis TN 33.8
88 Fort Worth TX 33
89 Henderson NV 32.6
90 Wichita KS 31.6
91 Corpus Christi TX 31
92 Arlington TX 30.8
93 Detroit MI 30.5
94 Bakersfield CA 30.3
95 Louisville KY 28.8
96 Indianapolis IN 28.6
97 Toledo OH 27.8
98 Tulsa OK 27.8
99 North Las Vegas NV 27.2
100 Oklahoma City OK 20.8


About the American College of Sports Medicine
The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 50,000 international, national and regional members are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to improve educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine. More details can be found at www.acsm.org.

ACSM is a global leader in promoting the benefits of physical activity and advocates for legislation that helps government and the health community make it a priority. ACSM encourages Congress to support continued funding of parks, trails and safe routes to school, to better enable all Americans to meet the prescribed physical activity recommendations included in the National Physical Activity Guidelines.

About Anthem Foundation
The Anthem Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc. and through charitable contributions and programs, the Foundation promotes the inherent commitment of Anthem, Inc. to enhance the health and well-being of individuals and families in communities that Anthem, Inc. and its affiliated health plans serve. The Foundation focuses its funding on strategic initiatives that make up its Healthy Generations Program, a multi-generational initiative that targets: maternal health, diabetes prevention, cancer prevention, heart health and healthy, active lifestyles, behavioral health efforts and programs that benefit people with disabilities. The Foundation also coordinates the company’s year-round Dollars for Dollars program which provides a 100 percent match of associates’ donations, as well as its Volunteer Time Off and Dollars for Doers community service programs. To learn more about the Anthem Foundation, please visit http://www.anthem.foundation and its blog at https://medium.com/anthemfoundation.

Take A Deep Breath: How To Cope With Panic Attacks

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Submitted by The Baylor College of Medicine….

BaylorCollegeWith symptoms that often mimic heart attacks, panic attacks can be extremely scary for people who experience them. To help, Baylor College of Medicine’s Dr. Asim Shah gives his recommendations on recognizing the signs of a panic attack and relaxation strategies you can use if you are having one.

“Panic attacks are a mental health disorder that fall under the category of a panic disorder. Panic attacks can occur when a person becomes uncontrollably anxious, nervous or fearful,” said Shah, professor and executive vice chair in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor.

There can be numerous causes of panic disorders, Shah said. They can have a genetic cause or a person may be more sensitive and react negatively to stress or anxiety. Common reasons why people have panic attacks include the death of a loved one, a divorce or loss of a job, but any stressful situation can cause panic attacks.

The symptoms of a panic attack can include:

  • Feeling impending doom
  • Feeling detached from reality
  • Feeling like your heart is sinking
  • Feeling like you are losing control or even dying
  • An increased heart rate
  • Shaking, trembling or having chills
  • Sweating or cramps
  • Tightness in your chest or throat

“In some ways, having a panic attack can resemble having a heart attack. Some people end up going to the emergency room thinking they are having a heart attack but come to find out they are having a panic attack,” Shah said.

yogaposeIf you realize that you are having a panic attack, there are few strategies that Shah recommends for you to use to help relax. The first step is to try to divert your thoughts to positive thinking. You also can do breathing and mindfulness exercises. For example, you can close your eyes, picture yourself somewhere you feel safe, and deeply and slowly breathe in and out. These exercises also can help with any muscle tension you might be experiencing because of the panic attack.

Shah added that is important to differentiate between panic and anxiety. Panic happens immediately. It can be unpredictable and unprovoked but the feeling lasts no more than 30 minutes. With anxiety, people can be fearful and have a feeling of doom, but it is less intense and can last for months.

“Panic attacks are easily treatable so please seek help if you are experiencing them,” Shah said. “Untreated panic attacks can cause complications with your medical and mental health and impact your social life. For example, you may avoid going to work or school or social engagements, which can lead to depression and then possibly to having suicidal thoughts. Some people may even develop alcohol and substance addictions. Given this, it is very important to be treated before any of these complications can arise.

SRC-1 Gene Variants Linked To Human Obesity

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From The Baylor College of Medicine…..

BaylorCollegeMaintaining a healthy body weight is no simple matter. A better understanding of how the body regulates appetite could help tip the scale toward the healthy side. Contributing toward this goal, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Cambridge reports in the journal Nature Communications that the gene SRC-1 affects body weight control by regulating the function of neurons in the hypothalamus – the appetite center of the brain.

Mice lacking the SRC-1 gene eat more and become obese. SRC-1 also seems to be involved in regulating human body weight. The researchers identified in severely obese children 15 rare SRC-1 genetic variants that disrupt its function. When mice were genetically engineered to express one of these variants, the animals ate more and gained weight.

“The protein called steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) is known to participate in the regulation of body weight, but its precise role is not clear,” said co-corresponding author Dr. Yong Xu, associate professor of pediatrics and of molecular and cellular biology and a researcher at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital. “Here we explored the role of SRC-1 in the hypothalamus, a brain area that regulates appetite.”

The researchers discovered that SRC-1 is highly expressed in the hypothalamus of mice, specifically in neurons that express the Pomc gene. Pomc neurons are known to regulate appetite and body weight.

Further experiments showed that SRC-1 is involved in regulating the expression of Pomc gene in these cells. When Xu and his colleagues deleted the SRC-1 gene in Pomc neurons, the cells expressed less Pomc and the mice ate more and became obese.

The researchers also explored whether SRC-1 also would play a role in regulating human body weight.

“We had identified a group of severely obese children carrying rare genetic variants in the SRC-1 gene,” said co-corresponding author Dr. I. Sadaf Farooqi, professor of metabolism and medicine in the Department of Clinical Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge and Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow.

Working together, Xu, Sadaf Farooqi and their colleagues found that many of the SRC-1 variants in the obese children produced dysfunctional proteins that disrupted the normal function of SRC-1. On the other hand, SRC-1 variants in healthy individuals did not disrupt SRC-1 function.

saladheartsmallFurthermore, mice genetically engineered to express one of the human SRC-1 genetic variants found in obese children ate more and gained weight. This is the first report of SRC-1 playing a role in the hypothalamus in the context of body weight control.

“By providing evidence that bridges basic and genetic animal studies and human genetic data, we have made the case that SRC-1 is an important regulator of body weight,” Xu said.

Other contributors to this work include Yongjie Yang, Agatha A. van der Klaauw, Liangru Zhu, Tessa M. Cacciottolo, Yanlin He, Lukas K.J. Stadler, Chunmei Wang, Pingwen Xu, Kenji Saito, Antentor Hinton Jr, Xiaofeng Yan, Julia M. Keogh, Elana Henning, Matthew C. Banton, Audrey E. Hendricks, Elena G. Bochukova, Vanisha Mistry, Katherine L. Lawler, Lan Liao, Jianming Xu, Stephen O’Rahilly, Qingchun Tong, UK10K consortium, Inês Barroso and Bert W. O’Malley. The authors are affiliated with one or more of the following institutions: Baylor College of Medicine; University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories; Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science; Huazhong University of Sciences & Technology, China; Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge; University of Colorado – Denver and University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

For a complete list of the sources of financial support for this project, visit this link.

 

Study Reports Emerging Triggers Of Rare Food Allergy In Infants

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News from the Baylor College of Medicine…..

BaylorCollegeA study led by the section of immunology, allergy and rheumatology in the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine researches an uncommon food allergy known as ‘food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome’ (FPIES) that occurs mostly in infants. The findings of the study determine the responsible foods triggers, as well as the characteristics and management of FPIES. 

“One of the main problems with FPIES is that it can be challenging to diagnose,” said Dr. Aikaterini Anagnostou, associate professor of pediatric allergy at Baylor, director of the food immunotherapy program at Texas Children’s Hospital and the lead researcher in the study. She stressed that FPIES symptoms can mimic other illnesses, such as viral gastroenteritis or sepsis in infants.

“I often find that this condition is misdiagnosed and that many people are not aware of it,” Anagnostou said. “There is also a significant delay in the diagnosis, and I have heard many stories from patients coming into my clinic and raising all of these concerns. The aim of our study is to further investigate FPIES, and to raise awareness of this uncommon food allergic disorder.”

The main symptoms of FPIES include vomiting, lethargy, pallor and diarrhea, which are triggered by typical weaning foods such as cow’s milk, soy, rice and oats. Anagnostou explains that weaning foods are introduced to infants when they are being weaned off breast milk or formula and onto solid foods. In contrast to other food allergies, FPIES presents with a delayed reaction two to four hours after ingesting the food.

The study took place over a three-year period from 2015 to 2017 and included 74 infant cases of FPIES in the area. The findings reveal that rice is the most common trigger amongst children affected by FPIES in Houston (cow milk is the most common cause in other U.S. geographic locations). Rarer triggers such as banana and avocado also were identified as more common for this population. Anagnostou also reported that a significant percentage of children had multiple food triggers, an unusual observation for FPIES-related studies.

“It is difficult to ascertain why we see different triggers in this area,” Anagnostou said. “We suspect that this observation is related to different dietary and weaning habits, with certain foods preferred as weaning foods in our area compared to other areas in the United States.”

Additionally, Anagnostou reported a six-month delay in the diagnosis of FPIES in the Houston population. “This finding highlights once more how challenging FPIES can be to recognize and diagnose,” she said. “For instance, we found that 22 percent of infants in our study received a sepsis work-up because it is often difficult to differentiate between FPIES and sepsis in young infants, especially at initial presentation.”

Due to the profuse vomiting caused by FPIES, infants can experience dehydration or in more severe cases, go into shock during the acute phase of the disease. In more chronic cases, Anagnostou said failure to thrive and malnutrition may occur if parents do not seek medical help.

“Another new finding of our study was the significant percentage of infants at risk for malnutrition because the parents become worried about introducing other foods,” Anagnostou said. “As a result of this, infants may suffer from a very limited and restricted diet.”

Anagnostou said that consulting a dietitian is one of the crucial parts of managing the disease so that families can receive education on proper food introduction. Also key to managing the condition is fluid resuscitation for severe dehydration and oral rehydration for mild cases. Anagnostou notes that giving epinephrine will not work for this type of allergy.

After a diagnosis of FPIES is made, Anagnostou recommends avoiding the triggering food. Subsequently, the food may be tried in the hospital setting under medical supervision, every 12 to 18 months to assess whether FPIES is outgrown.

“Different people outgrow FPIES at different time points,” Anagnostou said. “The food can be tried in a controlled environment and if there is a reaction, it will be treated appropriately. If the food is tolerated and there is no reaction during the observation period, then it can be reintroduced into the diet.”

mombabyAnagnostou advises parents who notice repeat reactions (usually profuse vomiting) after introducing a new food into their child’s diet to seek medical help and potentially consider this diagnosis. “I am not suggesting that for every child that vomits after a food introduction the diagnosis will be FPIES,” she said. “Of course, there are several factors at play here and many other diseases to consider, but this is something to keep in mind if the reaction is consistent with certain food triggers.”

One of the reassuring facts about FPIES is that most children outgrow the disease once they are older and that it rarely carries into adulthood. Anagnostou said there have been a few recorded cases of adult FPIES, with the main triggers being nuts and shellfish.

“There is a lot of information that is still missing,” Anagnostou said. “We don’t know much yet about the disease’s mechanism or any specific risk factors that could predispose an infant to having FPIES. What is clear is that we need to raise awareness about FPIES so that we minimize the delay in the diagnosis, which can be a significant source of anxiety for families.”

The full study was published this month in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology journal.

High-fructose Corn Syrup Boosts Intestinal Tumor Growth In Mice

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Submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine….

BaylorCollegeDoes sugar directly feed cancers, boosting their growth? The answer seems to be ‘Yes’ at least in mice according to a study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medicine. Their study, published in Science, showed that consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup – the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily – accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mouse models of the disease, independently of obesity. The team also discovered the mechanism by which the consumption of sugary drinks can directly feed cancer growth, suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies.

“An increasing number of observational studies have raised awareness of the association between consuming sugary drinks, obesity and the risk of colorectal cancer,” said co-corresponding author Dr. Jihye Yun, assistant professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor. “The current thought is that sugar is harmful to our health mainly because consuming too much can lead to obesity. We know that obesity increases the risk of many types of cancer including colorectal cancer; however, we were uncertain whether a direct and causal link existed between sugar consumption and cancer. Therefore, I decided to address this important question when I was a postdoc in the Dr. Lewis Cantley lab at Weill Cornell Medicine.

First, Yun and her colleagues generated a mouse model of early-stage colon cancer where APC gene is deleted. “APC is a gatekeeper in colorectal cancer. Deleting this protein is like removing the breaks of a car. Without it, normal intestinal cells neither stop growing nor die, forming early stage tumors called polyps. More than 90 percent of colorectal cancer patients have this type of APC mutation”, Yun said.

Using this mouse model of the disease, the team tested the effect of consuming sugar-sweetened water on tumor development. The sweetened water was 25 percent high-fructose corn syrup, which is the main sweetener of sugary drinks people consume. High-fructose corn syrup consists of glucose and fructose at a 45:55 ratio.

When the researchers provided the sugary drink in the water bottle for the APC-model mice to drink at their will, mice rapidly gained weight in a month. To prevent the mice from being obese and mimic humans’ daily consumption of one can of soda, the researchers gave the mice a moderate amount of sugary water orally with a special syringe once a day. After two months, the APC-model mice receiving sugary water did not become obese, but developed tumors that were larger and of higher-grade than those in model mice treated with regular water.

“These results suggest that when the animals have early stage of tumors in the intestines – which can occur in many young adult humans by chance and without notice – consuming even modest amounts of high-fructose corn syrup in liquid form can boost tumor growth and progression independently of obesity,” Yun said. “Further research is needed to translate these discovery to people; however, our findings in animal models suggest that chronic consumption of sugary drinks can shorten the time it takes cancer to develop. In humans, it usually takes 20 to 30 years for colorectal cancer to grow from early stage benign tumors to aggressive cancers.”

soda“This observation in animal models might explain why increased consumption of sweet drinks and other foods with high sugar content over the past 30 years is correlating with an increase in colorectal cancers in 25 to 50-year-olds in the United States,” said Cantley, co-corresponding author, former mentor of Yun and professor of cancer biology in medicine and director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine.

The team then investigated the mechanism by which this sugar promoted tumor growth. They discovered that the APC-model mice receiving modest high-fructose corn syrup had high amounts of fructose in their colons. “We observed that sugary drinks increased the levels of fructose and glucose in the colon and blood, respectively and that tumors could efficiently take up both fructose and glucose via different routes.”

Using cutting-edge technologies to trace the fate of glucose and fructose in tumor tissues, the team showed that fructose was first chemically changed and this process then enabled it to efficiently promote the production of fatty acids, which ultimately contribute to tumor growth.

“Most previous studies used either glucose or fructose alone to study the effect of sugar in animals or cell lines. We thought that this approach did not reflect how people actually consume sugary drinks because neither drinks nor foods have only glucose or fructose. They have both glucose and fructose together in similar amounts,” Yun said. “Our findings suggest that the role of fructose in tumors is to enhance glucose’s role of directing fatty acids synthesis. The resulting abundance of fatty acids can be potentially used by cancer cells to form cellular membranes and signaling molecules, to grow or to influence inflammation.”

To determine whether fructose metabolism or increased fatty acid production was responsible for sugar-induced tumor growth, the researchers modified APC-model mice to lack genes coding for enzymes involved in either fructose metabolism or fatty acid synthesis. One group of APC-model mice lacked an enzyme KHK, which is involved in fructose metabolism, and another group lacked enzyme FASN, which participates in fatty acid synthesis. They found that mice lacking either of these genes did not develop larger tumors, unlike APC-model mice, when fed the same modest amounts of high-fructose corn syrup.

“This study revealed the surprising result that colorectal cancers utilize high-fructose corn syrup, the major ingredient in most sugary sodas and many other processed foods, as a fuel to increase rates of tumor growth,” Cantley said. “While many studies have correlated increased rates of colorectal cancer with diet, this study shows a direct molecular mechanism for the correlation between consumption of sugar and colorectal cancer.”

“Our findings also open new possibilities for treatment,” Yun said. “Unlike glucose, fructose is not essential for the survival and growth of normal cells, which suggests that therapies targeting fructose metabolism are worth exploring. Alternatively, avoiding consuming sugary drinks as much as possible instead of relying on drugs would significantly reduce the availability of sugar in the colon.”

didyouknowWhile further studies in humans are necessary, Yun and colleagues hope this research will help to raise public awareness about the potentially harmful consequences consuming sugary drinks has on human health and contribute to reducing the risk and mortality of colorectal cancer worldwide.

Other contributors to this work include Drs. Sukjin Yang, Yumei Wang and Justin Van Riper with Baylor, Marcus Goncalves (lead author), Changyuan Lu, Jordan Trautner, Travis Hartman, Seo-Kyoung Hwang, Charles Murphy, Roxanne Morris, Sam Taylor, Quiying Chen, Steven Gross and Kyu Rhee, all with Weill Cornell Medicine, Chantal Pauli with the University Hospital Zurich, Kaitlyn Bosch with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, H Carl Lekaye with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Jatin Roper with Duke University and Young Kim with Chonnam National University.

– This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, Stand Up 2 Cancer, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas and the National Cancer Institute.

Infrared For Health

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By Francis Bangayan

healthywordsInfrared for health an extremely effective process. Infrared heat energy is a form that allows you to penetrate deeper in your body than heat and other types of thermal energy. Infrared red heat can be used more broadly with infrared light therapy device locally or with infrared sauna. We know that before the event of exercise or sports, the body must be warmed, then it also knows that heat increases blood flow and increases muscle strength.

Seniors suffer more lasting fatigue, fall and injury, back and joints, chronic pain, high blood pressure, sleep disorders, and many other complex problems. Lifestyle and dietary changes are often part of the overall treatment of these conditions. However, the latest version of the heat-therapy or Far Infrared Therapy, FIR Treatment, is the effective process of natural pain relief supplements.

Infrared Sauna For Health

Infrared is a type of bath that uses light to create heat. Sauna is such a remote infrared snack that goes far away, where infrared waves fall into the spectrum of light. A traditional sauna uses heat to heat the air and also emphasizes your body. An infrared sauna heats your body directly without heating the air around you.

Saunas application is usually increased by normal exercise, such as strong sweating and heart rate, as well as the same reaction. An infrared sauna translates into real health benefits to people who can not stand with temperature. Most studies have found evidence of beneficial use of infrared saunas in the treatment of chronic health problems like long blood pressure, congestive heart failure, headaches, type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.

Infrared For Cardiovascular Health

Infrared heat utilizes certain risks such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Infrared heat can help cardiovascular health, which makes it easier to control the temperature on your body with physical activity on a moderate pace.

Infrared Heat For Muscular Injuries

Infrared heat helps improve your muscular healing by increasing blood flow to the injured muscles and increasing muscle strength. Physical therapists have explained that as well as providing deep heating to your muscles, infrared heat releases nitric oxide. Increasing the circulation of oxygen and other nutrients to improve the nitric oxide circulation in the injured area. Physical therapists use infrared light therapy devices to produce infrared heat and treat a specific injury like strained hamstring and muscle wounds.

Conclusion

sunSunlight is needed for life and health. The safest segment of the sun’s energy comes from infrared light, which extends medical benefits for various health conditions. Studies show that far infrared increases circulation on the skin, changes sleep, prevents pain, prevents oxidative stress, and ensures recovery by removing inflammation. About 80% of solar energy produces many infrared rays. Far infrared radiation extract all of the sun’s beneficial healing properties when removing its harmful effects such as ultraviolet radiation.

Therefore, researchers have shown that many infrared radiation can create strong benefits, which can be applied to numerous medical conditions such as cancer and diabetes as well as for its treatment conditions.

– Francis Bangayan is the creator of the Infrared Heating Biomat for Health. The infraredforhealth.com provides information, methods and ways in using the technology of infrared heating mattress to improve your biochemistry, your body and your mind to reclaim your health.

 

The 31st Anniversary Of Project ACES

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The 31st anniversary of Project ACES (All Children Exercise Simultaneously) will be taking place on May 1st, 2019.  Come join the fun.

Project ACES is a signature program of the Youth Fitness Coalition, Inc. Project ACES was created by physical education teacher Len Saunders in 1989 as a method of motivating children to exercise. ACES takes place on the first Wednesday in May as part of National Physical Fitness and Sports Month along with National Physical Education Week. It has been labeled as “the world’s largest exercise class” by the media. Since 1989, millions of children from all over the world exercise together to promote proper health and fitness habits. With the obesity epidemic facing the youth of the world, children’s fitness plays a major role in fighting heart disease. Project ACES hopes to address these issues with its big event in May, as well as schools that participate in daily Project ACES Clubs throughout the year.

To learn more, visit the Project ACES website at:  projectaces.com

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5 Types Of Insurance For Independent Consultants And Business Owners

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By Jade Sohn

workdeskBe prepared and opt for the right insurance policies to safeguard yourself against unpredictable hazards or issues that may pop up while running your business.  Choosing suitable insurance plans can prove to be a challenging task. Chief among them is a general liability and professional liability insurance.

Also, individual consultants and married entrepreneurs only qualify for individual health insurance, leaving room for very few Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) options. Further, if you miss an HMO open enrollment period, your organization may have to survive an entire year without coverage. What would you do if an unpredictable event occurs during that time? This post talks about various options that can work as great alternatives in such a situation. Read further to explore them in detail.

1. Professional Liability Insurance

Did you know that if you are a sole proprietor of a business consultancy, you can be held legally and financially liable for any financial loss to your client resulting from your advice or occurring during your involvement? This means that you need to be prepared for the legal and financial fallout of such a situation. Even if your business is billing in the hundreds of thousands, being taken to court could cause you financial hardship, so you may benefit from subscribing to an insurance policy designed for consultant businesses.

If allegations of errors, bad advice or delay in providing a service threaten a consultant’s business, then consultant professional liability insurance can cover costs of hiring an attorney and any settlement or damages arising from the lawsuit.

2. General Liability Insurance

General liability insurance protects consultants against allegations of bodily injury, property damage, and advertising and personal injury. If your client suffers a slip and fracture at your firm, or if you accidentally damage an expensive artifact on your client’s premise, the general liability insurance will cover the medical costs and costs of replacing the artifact respectively.

General liability insurance also covers any legal challenges arising from advertising or personal injuries such as slander, libel, and defamation. If a consultant publishes any material containing false statements about a competitor or makes derogatory comments about a client before others in a way that can cause the client grief or suffering, or causes harm to his professional reputation, then a personal injury lawsuit can be brought against the ‘perpetrator’.

No matter how carefully or conscientiously you may run your consulting business, there is at least a small window of error that can potentially pose financial or legal hurdles. General liability insurance safeguards against such contingencies, allowing you to focus on challenging unfair cases and staying focused on your business rather than stressing about paying attorney fees and financial damages from your business or personal funds.

3.Short-term health insurance

If you’re hard-pressed for time and don’t have enough resources to consider or purchase long-term health insurance, you can opt for short-term health insurance. The advantage of short-term health insurance is that it’s relatively inexpensive. It also holds you to low standards of commitment, so you can always revisit the decision and choose another, better-suited health insurance for your business. Short-term health insurance, however, is not completely reliable. You may be refused coverage if the event involves a chronic health disorder. Plus, coverage earned by short-term health insurance is for low amounts.

4. Insurance through associations

healthyheartbpSome industry associations offer health insurance as a side-benefit of joining. If you are starting a consultancy business, you may want to join networking or co-promotion organizations in your city or town. These organization of which NASE is an example, offer benefits such as health insurance. However, studies by journals such as WSJ have claimed that the ROI (Return on Investment) that you receive from joining such an organization doesn’t justify the enormous joining fees that they charge. However, you may want to consider all benefits such as networking, exposure, and new leads that you get from the organization when weighing the benefits.

5. Health cost sharing

People with good health can consider health cost sharing networks as an option for health insurance. There are companies such as Liberty Healthshare, CHM, and New Health that have started up to provide affordable and no-fuss health insurance for those who can’t afford to go with regular, long-term health insurance. However, such insurance networks tend to reject many applicants on the grounds of having existing health disorders.

When starting a consultancy business, there are many factors that you have to consider. If you can’t manage all of that by yourself, you can work with smart alternatives or hacks that work just as well. This post describes various types of health insurances that can help you fight against unpredictable health hazards or issues that may crop up when running your business. After all, it’s best to be prepared than suffer expensive consequences of ignorant decisions.