How To Keep Your Food – And Your Insulin – Down During The Holidays

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This article is courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your comments below…..

partycelebrateDon’t let holiday feasts come back to haunt you – planning meals can help those with acid reflux and diabetes enjoy the festive foods, said experts at Baylor College of Medicine.

“Advanced meal planning will ensure that people with stricter diets have items to enjoy,” said Dr. Mohamed Othman, assistant professor of medicine – gastroenterology at Baylor.

Acid reflux

Acid reflux occurs when the contents of the stomach come back up into the esophagus, which can result in heartburn or belly discomfort. By standing upright after eating, gravity helps keep the contents of the stomach down.

“Do not lay down immediately after your meal,” Othman said. “It takes four hours for the stomach to empty solid contents and two hours for liquid content.”

Diabetes

For those with diabetes, overindulgence can lead to more serious health concerns, said Dr. Alan Garber, professor of medicine – diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism at Baylor.

“Holiday food tends to be rich in carbohydrates and fats, and both of these may increase insulin requirements,” he said. “You should be aware of the amount of sugar in holiday treats.”

What to do

Modifying eating habits can alleviate reflux symptoms. If suffering from acid reflux, Othman recommended avoiding the following foods and drinks:

* Chocolate
* Mint
* Fried foods
* Wine
* Coffee

Brief walks after meals and adopting a more active lifestyle in general can improve reflux symptoms, he said.

Garber offers these tips to help diabetics manage holiday eating:

* Look for sugar-free items at the grocery store

* Control your portions

* High-fat meals independently produce insulin resistance and raise insulin requirements, so be sure sugar-free items are not high in fat

* Avoid alcoholic drinks

While it is important to be aware and cautious of what you are eating and how it affects your health, Baylor experts advise focusing on the fun of the holidays rather than the restrictions.

Your Guide To Cutting Down On Fats, Salt And Sugar – Part 2

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

saltshakerYou can reduce your sodium intake if you:

1. Cook at home from scratch and reduce the amount of salt you add to dishes.

2. Check labels for sodium in all its forms. Table salt is mainly sodium chloride, but canned or packaged foods can contain other forms of sodium.

3. In the kitchen and at the dinner table, substitute spices, herbs, and salt-free blends for salt.

4. When you do opt for packaged foods, choose products that are sodium free or low in sodium. A typical cup of miso soup, for instance, contains 700 to 900 milligrams of sodium, so look for canned soups with “low sodium” or “reduced sodium” on the label. Bread and cereals carry loads of sodium. Buy the lowest sodium kind you can find and avoid white flour brands.

5. Watch out for salad dressings, ready- made pasta sauces, cup-o-soup products, canned vegetables, frozen pizzas, sausages, pepperoni, canned tuna, and pretty much any food that requires preservation or shelf life.

6. In a restaurant, ask your waiter which dishes are the lowest in sodium and ask of the chef can prepare yours without adding salt.

The overall best approach is to scan the ingredient list before eating or drinking anything. Any ingredient with “sodium” or “Na” — the chemical name for sodium — in its name contains the substance. Sodium might also be labeled as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate or salt.

Sugar

Astonishingly, Americans consume an estimated 130 pounds of added sugar per capita annually. That’s about 22 teaspoons daily for adults; roughly 32 teaspoons children (almost three-fourths of a cup). Topping the added-sugar intake list are soft drinks, accounting for 33 percent of added sugar consumed daily.

Overconsumption of added sugar and high-glycemic carbohydrates (like those found in breads, pizza, cold cereals and other baked goods) has been linked to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

One of the most effective things you can do to improve your health is to cut back radically on sugar consumption; in particular, avoid sugared beverages entirely. If this seems overwhelming, taper off slowly – add slightly less sugar to your coffee or tea every day and start by drinking fewer soft drinks per week, etc. You will quickly discover that the craving for sugar dissipates. Foods that once seemed pleasantly sweet begin to taste sickly sweet .

Steer clear of artificial sweeteners – they have chemical components and adverse long term health consequences and the best solution is to choose natural sweeteners like organic raw sugar, maple syrup, or fruit sauces (apple or pear) and cut way back on quantity and portion size.

If you reduce your consumption of Bad saturated fats, salt and sugar you will be on your way to a healthier body, a leaner frame, more energy and you will reduce your risk for heart disease, stroke, obesity and diabetes.

Kac Young has earned three doctorate degrees: a Ph.D in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a spiritual counselor, a teacher, and a licensed Religious Science minister. Her books: “21 Days to the Love of Your Life”; “Discover Your Spiritual Genius”; “Dancing With the Moon,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Gold Mind,” “Heart Easy,” “The Path to Fabulous,” “Cheese Dome Power,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies,” and “Supreme Healing,” are designed to give the reader tools for self improvement.

[1] Conducted by an international team led by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian of Harvard University’s School of Public Health, was published Aug. 13, 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Your Guide To Cutting Down On Fats, Salt And Sugar – Part 1

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Fats:

healthychoiceThere are two kinds of fats: Good and Bad.

The good guys are unsaturated fats: monounsaturateds (MUFAs), found in foods like olive oil and avocados, and polyunsaturateds (PUFAs), found in sunflower and corn oils, among others, and in the omega-3s in salmon and walnuts. Both types the “good ” title because they’ve been shown to lower blood cholesterol and the risk for heart disease.

The villain, we’ve long been told, is saturated fat. The conventional wisdom, which dates to the 1950s, is that saturated fat, which is present in meat, dairy, and some plant products, increases our total cholesterol and chance for heart disease and stroke. Trans fat, the staple fat that dominates packaged goods and fast food, is another very bad guy: It not only gooses up our LDL cholesterol but also lowers our HDL cholesterol (the kind that helps sweep bad cholesterol out of the body). The American Heart Association recommends limiting your intake of saturated fat to less than 7 percent of your total calories (if you eat 2,000 calories a day, that’s 16 grams, roughly the amount in a chocolate milk shake) and of trans fats to no more than two grams a day. Safest idea is to have NO trans fats per day.

What you can do immediately is swap animal fats for vegetable oils — for instance, using soybean oil or olive oil instead of butter because studies have shown these lower LDL cholesterol levels and disease risk. “Be careful not to replace saturated fats with refined carbs or your triglycerides can go up and your good HDL cholesterol can go down,” explains Alice H. Lichtenstein, the director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University. High triglycerides and low HDL are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and criteria of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health problems linked to heart disease and diabetes.

Salt:

Across the world, the excessive consumption of sodium–hiding in breads, soups and snack foods and beckoning from salt shakers everywhere–is the cause of some 1.65 million deaths by heart disease and strokes yearly, including roughly 667,000 “premature” deaths–those before the age of 70–says a comprehensive new study [1].

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state: ” We all need a small amount (e.g., between about 180 mg and 500 mg per day) of sodium to keep our bodies working properly. But the average daily sodium intake for Americans age 2 years and older is 3,436 mg.”

High sodium consumption raises blood pressure and high blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the nation’s first and third leading causes of death, respectively.

Research shows when salt intake is reduced, blood pressure begins decreasing for most people within a few days to weeks. Populations who consume diets low in salt do not experience the increase in blood pressure with age that is seen in most Western countries.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

Kac Young has earned three doctorate degrees: a Ph.D in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a spiritual counselor, a teacher, and a licensed Religious Science minister. Her books: “21 Days to the Love of Your Life”; “Discover Your Spiritual Genius”; “Dancing With the Moon,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Gold Mind,” “Heart Easy,” “The Path to Fabulous,” “Cheese Dome Power,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies,” and “Supreme Healing,” are designed to give the reader tools for self improvement.

Researcher: Chowing Down On Watermelon Could Lower Blood Pressure

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watermelonBe sure to pick up a watermelon — or two — at your neighborhood farmers’ market.

It could save your life.

A new study by Florida State University Associate Professor Arturo Figueroa, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, found that watermelon could significantly reduce blood pressure in overweight individuals both at rest and while under stress.

“The pressure on the aorta and on the heart decreased after consuming watermelon extract,” Figueroa said.

The study started with a simple concept. More people die of heart attacks in cold weather because the stress of the cold temperatures causes blood pressure to increase and the heart has to work harder to pump blood into the aorta. That often leads to less blood flow to the heart.

Thus, people with obesity and high blood pressure face a higher risk for stroke or heart attack when exposed to the cold either during the winter or in rooms with low temperatures.

So, what might help their hearts?

It turned out that watermelon may be part of the answer.

Figueroa’s 12-week study focused on 13 middle-aged, obese men and women who also suffered from high blood pressure. To simulate cold weather conditions, one hand of the subject was dipped into 39 degree water (or 4 degrees Celsius) while Figueroa’s team took their blood pressure and other vital measurements.

Meanwhile, the group was divided into two. For the first six weeks, one group was given four grams of the amino acid L-citrulline and two grams of L-arginine per day, both from watermelon extract. The other group was given a placebo for 6 weeks.

Then, they switched for the second six weeks.

Participants also had to refrain from taking any medication for blood pressure or making any significant changes in their lifestyle, particularly related to diet and exercise, during the study.

The results showed that consuming watermelon had a positive impact on aortic blood pressure and other vascular parameters.

Notably, study participants showed improvements in blood pressure and cardiac stress while both at rest and while they were exposed to the cold water.

“That means less overload to the heart, so the heart is going to work easily during a stressful situation such as cold exposure,” Figueroa said.

Figueroa has conducted multiple studies on the benefits of watermelon. In the past, he examined how it impacts post-menopausal women’s arterial function and the blood pressure readings of adults with pre-hypertension.

– Submitted by Florida State University News

Super Simple Tips To Help Kidney Problems Down The Road – Part 2

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By Monica Moran

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

fruitswhite3. Make Sure That You Drink Plenty of Fresh Fruit/Vegetable Juice

Now don’t feel that drinking juice will result in you becoming a super human being who can’t get any sort of diseases. But you should look at it as something you should do to help improve the health of your kidneys and your overall health and well being.

The other great benefit of drinking fresh vegetable juice on a regular basis is that it will allow your digestive system to become extremely efficient, which of course will result in it being able to absorb all the excess water in your body with great ease, and at the same time get rid of all the waste products that are floating about.

However if you happen to be a person that is suffering from kidney stones then you must totally avoid making juice from spinach, collard greens and beets. The reason for this is that these vegetables are naturally higher in oxalic acid which actually causes more and more kidney stones from being made.

4. Make Sure You Start Eating Clean and Healthy

You need to know and appreciate that all that happens inside your body is directly the result of the foods that you put in your body.

If you happen to eat foods that are unhealthy and toxic in nature then it will ultimately affect the organs of your body in a negative way.

This is why I highly encourage each and every one of you to totally avoid consuming processed junk foods from now on.

So what should you be focused on eating?

Well, as your primary concern is to better the health of your kidneys… you should focus on those foods that will help keep them as healthy as possible. So in this case I’d recommend that you focus on eating things such as green tea, garlic, parsley, celery, asparagus and fish.

5. Work Hard To Take All The Right Supplements

healthillustratedThe number one supplement that I’d recommend you take is that of cranberry extract. The reason I’d recommend this is because it will actively protect your bladder while at the same time keeping the overall health of your kidneys in great condition.

So how is this red berry so effective in keeping your kidneys functioning in optimal condition? Well, it’s all down to their ability to prevent harmful bacteria from getting stuck on the outer lining of your kidneys.

Cranberries also have the power to reduce inflammation and on top of that they contain a wonderful amount of antioxidants.

For the best results, I’d recommend that you take at least 400 mg of cranberry extract a day.

On top of cranberry extract I’d recommend that you start taking vitamin D supplements. Lack of vitamin D in the system is linked directly to having serious kidney problems.

Ensure that you’re getting in at least 2000 IU of vitamin D a day.

You have to appreciate that your kidneys were designed to last for your whole entire life. Making sure that you look after them by implementing the tips that I share in this article will mean that you will enjoy a life with great health and vitality… exactly what you want.

– If you enjoyed this article then be sure to check out Monica’s blog over at renaldietcure.com. There you’ll find some really interesting articles on a variety of different topics such as developing a positive frame of mind even though you have to deal with a disease! Do check it out, you might actually learn something really interested!

Super Simple Tips To Help Kidney Problems Down The Road – Part 1

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By Monica Moran

grandparentchildIf you’re like any other person out there then you’re probably already be doing something to try and improve the condition of your health.

We all on some level try to do things that will result in us avoiding getting diseases such as Diabetes and Alzheimer’s, while at the same time doing those things that will result in our heart health going up and up.

However can you even remember a time when you actually thought about improving the health of your kidneys? If not, maybe it’s time that you started paying them a little more attention.

You can literally say that after your heart, your kidneys are the most important organ in your body. They are responsible for filtering about 200 quarts of blood everyday.

Another extremely important job they have is to filter about 2 quarts of excess water a day… and all the waste that’s left is transported to the bladder where it is stored as urine.

Your kidney’s also produce hormones that regulate the blood chemicals that are floating about in your body.

So naturally you’d want to take the correct steps to make sure that your kidneys remain in their optimal condition for the rest of your life.

Here are some solid tips to help you keep your kidneys in remarkable health.

1. Start Drinking Way More Water Than You Already Do

Make sure that you remain as hydrated as possible because doing so will ensure that the volume and concentration of your blood will remain largely consistent.

watercupDrinking plenty of water will also result in your digestive system running as smooth as possible, and it will also ensure that your body temperature remains stable and finally staying hydrated will mean that all the toxins in your body will be removed as quickly as possible.

To get all of this done, you’re going to want to drink about 64 ounces of water each and every day.

However if you happen to be suffering from kidney problems already or you happen to sweat a lot more than normal then I’d highly recommend that you drink at least half your bodyweight in ounces in water.

So for example this would mean drinking at least 80 ounces of water everyday if you weighed in at about 160 pounds. But make sure that the water you do drink is filtered and pure!

2. Avoid Delaying Going To The Bathroom

As I said earlier your kidneys main job is to filter out all the blood that is in your body.

When your kidneys are done filtering all the blood in your body then all that will remain will be excess water and waste which will be transported to your bladder, ready to be flushed out.

But keep in mind that your bladder can only really hold in about 14 ounces of water, each and everyday.

When you avoid going to the bathroom, when you need to go… it causes your bladder to expand way more than it should do.

So when you finally do go to the bathroom, your bladder doesn’t actually empty out all the way. If you keep doing this again and again then it will result in you getting a urinary tract infection.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– If you enjoyed this article then be sure to check out Monica’s blog over at renaldietcure.com. There you’ll find some really interesting articles on a variety of different topics such as developing a positive frame of mind even though you have to deal with a disease! Do check it out, you might actually learn something really interested!

Put Down That Soda Or I’ll Shoot! – Part 2

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

sodaContinued from part 1 of this article…..

Which foods contain large amounts of sugar?

Sugar can be found in a wide variety of foods ranging from fruits to candy. It is important to determine the source of the sugar in your diet. Most of our sugar should come from fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, which contain natural sugars and also include vitamins and minerals.

Added sugar is found in items such as cakes, candy bars, sodas, and fruit juices. These items contain additional sweeteners in addition to the naturally occurring sugars. Foods with added sugars tend to be high in calories and low in vitamins and minerals.

What are the negative health effects of eating too much sugar?

A diet high in sugar can lead to weight gain, diabetes, nutrient deficiencies, cavities, and dental plaque.

Diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, loss of mobility, dependence on insulin and heart disease.

#3. Switching from sodas and sports drinks might initially foster some resistance because sodas are readily available everywhere, their enticing advertising brain washes us into thinking we’re cool if we drink them, and choosing an alternative requires that we go off automatic and think about our health. The solution: get creative and praise your family for making better health choices every time they do. Praise trumps a soda anytime.

– Choose infused water over sodas when shopping or dining out. Add mint, lemon, grapefruit or lime for a kick or use sliced cucumber or herbs for a more mellow taste.

– Select iced tea, (green, black, herbal, spicy, sweet) but not the bottled sugary, flavored ones. Pick a naturally brewed, unsweetened iced tea.

– Use seltzer or club soda with a splash of fruit juice for flavor and color.

– Choose iced coffee and make it with almond milk for sweetener.

– Store-bought smoothies and fruit drinks can be loaded with sugar, so make your own at home with ice, sugar free sparkling water, berries or melon and chopped mint.

– Low sodium broth is also a treat hot or iced in the summer.

Invite your family to participate in the switch from sodas to healthy drinks. Provide prizes for the most creative concoctions and post the recipes on your Face Book page. Be proud when anyone close to you makes a healthy choice and share the success with others. This one modification can save your family members future pain and disability.

– Kac Young , a former television director and producer, earned her PhD. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. While earning her Doctorates in Natural Health and Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University. She is the author of 10 books. Her flagship company, Heart Easy, is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and great taste. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding. Learn more http://www.HeartEasy.com

Put Down That Soda Or I’ll Shoot! – Part 1

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

sodabottleGot your attention? Good because this is important. Drinking sodas can lead to death and disease, period. Just look at the data: A new study from Europe suggests that, Drinking one 12-ounce sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by 22%.

• A recent study from France found a direct link between drinking diet soda (and regular soda) and increased risk for type 2 diabetes in women.

• Researchers say the increased risk of diabetes among sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumers in Europe mirrors that seen in a meta-analysis conducted in North America, which found a 25% increased risk of type 2 diabetes associated with a 12-oz daily increment of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption.

• A larger, international study, reports that slurping back large amounts of sugary beverages was associated with an increased body-mass index (BMI), which in turn was linked with BMI-related deaths from diabetes, CVD, and cancer.

Specifically, the researchers found that in 2010, 132 000 deaths from diabetes, 44 000 deaths from CVD, and 6000 deaths from cancer in the world could be attributed to drinking sugar-sweetened soft drinks, fruit juice, or sports beverages.

Hellooooooo! Aren’t those statistics staggering? And yet, there are those among us who want to fight for the right to kill themselves with sugary soft drinks! Don’t be one of them.
“But my kids love sodas,” you cry. Well if you love your kids you’ll give them something different than the high fructose, corn-syrup infused OTC sodas, pops and juice drinks that cause disease.
The American Heart Association recommends that you consume no more than 450 calories (36 ounces) of sugar-sweetened beverages a week.

In the US, the watchdog group Centers for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has petitioned authorities to regulate sugar-sweetened beverages, saying they are hazardous to human health and need to be regulated.

Convinced yet?

Here’s how you can start the switch at home. It’s a simple 3-step process that can reduce your family’s vulnerability to type 2 diabetes, cardio vascular disease, cancer and obesity.

#1. Summon your family and tell them about the sugars and corn syrup hidden in sodas. Pull up this site and talk about it: http://www.sugarstacks.com/beverages.htm

#2. Discuss these points:

How is sugar used by the body?

Sugar gives the body energy. Actually, it is the only source of energy for the brain and red blood cells. Each gram of sugar contains 4 calories. Unlike complex carbohydrates, sugars are digested quickly and are easily broken down into glucose, which is then used for energy. If a lot of sugar is eaten at one time, blood sugar levels can spike, which can increase the risk for developing diabetes.

How much sugar do I need in my diet?

Limiting the amount of sugar in the diet is important to your health. Sugar should account for fewer than 10% of your daily calories. This equates to 200 calories of sugar (50g) for a person eating 2000 calories a day.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Kac Young , a former television director and producer, earned her PhD. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. While earning her Doctorates in Natural Health and Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University. She is the author of 10 books. Her flagship company, Heart Easy, is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and great taste. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding. Learn more http://www.HeartEasy.com