Keeping Pregnant Mothers Safe From Blood Clots

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS). Please share your thoughts below…..

pregnantThe Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a podcast with Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC on keeping pregnant mothers safe from blood clots.

Preventing blood clots in pregnant mothers poses significant healthcare challenges. The risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers is almost ten times more likely than a non-pregnant woman. These patient safety risks increase for pregnant mothers who are obese. In the United States, more than two-thirds of adults are obese.

Because of the increased risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a podcast http://youtu.be/Um2BKewEWRg with Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC. Ms. Enslow is the Nurse Educator for the Women’s Health and Ambulatory Care Services at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut.

“Pregnant women are at a significantly higher risk than the general public for developing a blood clot simply because of the mechanisms that are in place to help them prevent hemorrhaging,” said Ms. Enslow. “So, our pregnant patients really need a lot more risk assessment during their hospitalization and even after discharge. If a blood clot is not detected or treated, it may become dislodged and travel up into the lung and that can create even more problems for the mom.”

In the podcast, Ms. Enslow discussed a case of a super morbidly obese pregnant mother. This mother had a BMI (body mass index) of 67. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal.

Four keys for managing the healthcare risk in obese pregnant mothers were identified during the podcast.

The first key – plan for the delivery.

Ms. Enslow explained the necessity of planning – “Pre-planning and communication between all of the team members is really key to achieving the most optimal clinical outcomes for patients with multiple challenging risk factors or individual characteristics. In specialties, such as obstetrics, we’re often faced with a complex patient that requires us to be really proactive and identifying risk factors early in the course of care. This type of preparedness is necessary to prevent adverse events and to identify individual risk factors that would best guide us in the management or plan for patients possible hospital acquired conditions or in adverse event prevention plans to achieve high quality outcomes.”

The second key – apply blood clot preventative measures.

Ms. Enslow described the measures taken in a case of super morbidly obese pregnant mother – “this patient fell into the high risk category for venous thromboembolism because of her multiple risk factors, including the high BMI, her gestational diabetes, her maternal age, or having a caesarean section. So, because of this, she was provided with sequential compression devices beginning in the operating room … [The sequential compression devices] stayed on throughout the recovery period in our PACU and also when the patient was transferred to the postpartum unit … We started chemical prophylaxis six hours following surgery for her and that was continued throughout her stay.”

The third key – preventing blood clots doesn’t stop when the mother leaves the hospital.

Ms. Enslow emphasized the importance of preventative measures when the mother returns to her home – “it’s important to remember that the commitment to prevent VTE doesn’t end when the patient is discharged. That’s why appropriate patient education is so important to help patients understand why they should comply with their care, with making sure they understand that they really need to continue taking their discharge medications. Our post-partum patients can get the sequential compression devices for use at home and need to keep all their follow-up appointments.”

The fourth key – use the OB VTE Safety Recommendations.

The OB VTE Safety Recommendation s were developed with the advice and counsel of a panel of experts brought together by the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety. They provide four concise steps that:

* Assess patients for VTE risk with an easy-to-use automated scoring system

* Provide the recommended prophylaxis regimen, depending on whether the mother is antepartum or postpartum.

* Reassess the patient every 24 hours or upon the occurrence of a significant event, like surgery.

* Ensure that the mother is provided appropriate VTE prevention education upon hospital discharge.

“Caring for Mrs M. was significantly helped by the guidance from the recently released OB VTE Safety Recommendations, which offers a fine clinical process that covers the entire continuum of care,” said Ms. Enslow.

The OB VTE Safety Recommendations are a free resource available on the PPAHS website – http://www.ppahs.org

The podcast was hosted by Pat Iyer, MSN, RN, LNCC. Ms. Iyer is a legal nurse consultant who provides education to healthcare providers about patient safety at http://www.patiyer.com.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org

Don’t Let A Blood Clot Spoil Your Travel Plans

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your comments below…..

didyouknow?Blood clots can develop in the legs during hours of sitting in a plane, train, or automobile, a condition called deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). These clots can be painful, and even deadly, reports the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

If a blood clot grows in a leg vein, it can interfere with circulation in the leg, causing pain and swelling. Sometimes a small piece of the clot breaks off and travels to another part of the body — this tiny traveler is known as an embolus. A pulmonary embolus — a clot that lodges in the lungs — can block the flow of oxygen to the body, leading to fatigue, breathlessness, chest pain, and even death. Approximately 300,000 people die from pulmonary embolism in the United States every year.

“It usually takes more than a single factor for DVT to develop,” says Dr. Julianne Stoughton, a vascular surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Age is one factor; the chance of developing a blood clot begins to increase after age 40 and continues to rise throughout life. Inactivity imposed by travel is another. Taking a medication that promotes blood clotting, as well as conditions like factor V Leiden mutation, cancer, and heart disease, also increase the risk.

Several preventive measures can reduce the risk of developing a blood clot when you’re on the road or in the air:

Wear compression stockings. These aren’t the thick, rubbery, beige hose of yesteryear. Compression stockings are now virtually indistinguishable from opaque hose and come in a variety of colors. Made from an elastic material, they exert more pressure at the ankle than at the calf. This helps send blood back up through the veins to the heart.

Move around. Take a break every hour. When on a plane, bus, or train, walk the aisles; when driving, stop at a rest area. While seated, practice tracing the letters of the alphabet in the air with one foot, then the other, using the big toe as a “pen point.”

Stay awake. Don’t take a sleeping pill. A long nap in a seated position lets blood pool in the legs.

Keep hydrated. Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol, which is dehydrating. Staying hydrated may mean more bathroom visits, but getting up and walking down the aisle keeps blood circulating.

Wear loose clothing. It’s less likely to restrict blood flow.

Ask a doctor about taking low-dose aspirin. There is some evidence that a taking a baby aspirin before a trip can prevent blood clots.

Read the full-length article: “Healthy travel: Don’t let this common hazard spoil your best-laid plans”

Also in the March 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

* Breast cancer isn’t as deadly for older women

* How core exercises can help neck pain

* What you may not know about pelvic organ prolapse

* How music improves memory and mood

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Factors That Boost Blood Glucose Levels Besides Food

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By Jeremy Lim

diabeteswordIf you have high blood sugar, you absolutely must alter your diet to manage the disease. It’s not optional. Sadly, many diabetics are non-compliant and choose to eat whatever they wish, to the detriment of their own health. It doesn’t have to be this way, though. If you care about your life, stick to your prescribed diet. But, also consider making these important lifestyle changes.

Watch Medications

Some medications can negatively affect your blood sugar, so make sure you’re telling your doctor everything about your medical history and any drugs you’re taking. Even if you don’t think your drug has the side-effects that would account for odd glucose readings, mention it anyway. Some side-effects aren’t common, so they’re not listed as prominently.

Take It Easy With Caffeine

Caffeine affects diabetics differently than non-diabetics. And, even within the community of diabetics, not everyone reacts the same to it. Caffeine can raise blood sugar in some, especially if you tend to put sugar in your coffee. In others, it lowers blood sugar. When in doubt, test your blood. It will tell you everything you need to know.

Exercise

Exercise is almost universally beneficial for diabetics, helping them to stabilize their blood sugar levels. In general, exercise will lower blood sugar, but you should always test before and after a workout, and watch the amount of insulin you take prior to heavy weightlifting or aerobics. Speaking of which, you should include both aerobics and weight-bearing activities in your exercise routine.

Illness Affect Blood Sugar Too

Getting sick can throw off normal blood sugar readings. Generally, illness raises blood sugar levels, but not always. So, don’t go pumping yourself full of insulin. Always check first and confirm. And, every illness can bring different blood sugar readings.

Stress

womanIt shouldn’t be a surprise that stress can negatively affect blood sugar levels. Both physical and emotional stress can influence blood sugar. It can go in either direction, but that direction is usually up.

Reducing stress can also help keep your blood sugar under control, so try to find outlets for stress if you live a hectic lifestyle. Even going to a day spa once a month, getting regular massages, and chilling out with an epsom salt bath a few times a week can really help you manage your stress levels.

An infrared heat lamp can also be very calming, as can infrared saunas, hot tubs, and even regular sunbathing. Or, doing something as simple as reading or playing video games could do the trick. Experiment with different methods and find out what works best for you.

Obesity

It’s more difficult to control your weight when you have diabetes. However, you should do everything you can to maintain a normal weight because excess body fat contributes to high or hard-to-control blood sugar levels. Usually, dietary changes will include maintaining a low-carb diet, while exercising should consist of both weight-bearing and aerobic fitness.

– Jeremy Lim has been involved in the family health field for some time now. When he gets some free time, he likes to sit down and write about his experiences in an effort to help others. For more information on blood glucose levels view the glucometer at OneTouch.

Correlation Between Blood Pressure Stress Response And Underwater Treadmill Training

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informationredDuring their scientific investigation of blood pressure as it relates to stress during exercise on an underwater treadmill, authors Lambert, et al, tracked the responses of 60 adults who worked out on either land-based treadmills or in a HydroWorx therapy pool on an underwater treadmill during very specific sessions each week.

For the estimated 67 million Americans who suffer from high blood pressure, finding natural ways to improve their condition can be challenging, especially for those who are generally sedentary. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believe that only 47 percent of people who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure have it under control. Unless this figure changes considerably, the cost of health care associated with high blood pressure treatment will only continue to skyrocket as Baby Boomers follow the natural aging processes. Thankfully, a recent study released by researchers at Texas A&M University may hold the key to helping those with higher than normal blood pressure keep their numbers at a lower rate through regular activity on an underwater treadmill in a HydroWorx therapy pool.

The study, Aquatic Treadmill Training Reduces Blood Pressure Reactivity to Physical Stress, has been published in the American College of Sports Medicine’s journal, Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®. During their scientific investigation of blood pressure as it relates to stress during exercise on an underwater treadmill, Authors Lambert, et al, tracked the responses of 60 adults who worked out on either land-based treadmills or in a HydroWorx therapy pool on an underwater treadmill during very specific sessions each week. The results of the testing showed that while all endurance exercise reduces blood pressure and the body’s related stress responses, the aquatic treadmill training significantly reduced the participants’ resting diastolic blood pressure more than the land-based treadmill training did. The researchers concluded that high blood pressure brought on by stress levels could be organically reduced through regular endurance intervals on an underwater treadmill.

Says Anson Flake, Co-Founder and CEO, HydroWorx, “We have heard anecdotal evidence of people using our therapy pools as a way to lower their blood pressure for years. Now, Texas A&M has put solid numbers to those claims. The science proves what we have always thought: Our products provide a low-impact, high-results alternative to lowering responses to everyday stressors.”

The outcome of the Texas A&M study provides a great deal of encouragement for those with high blood pressure who wish to become healthier through the use of a more natural remedy than medication. Even more reassuring is the fact that the participants were not highly active in their everyday lives, revealing the potential for any person to reap the benefits of aquatic treadmill exercise regimens.

About HydroWorx

Since the late 1990s, HydroWorx—based in Middletown, PA—has manufactured aquatic therapy pools with built-in underwater treadmills to enable physical therapists to more effectively offer their patients the opportunity to increase range of motion, decrease risk of falls and joint stress, and remain motivated through the rehab process. Every day, more than 23,000 athletes and patients use HydroWorx technology to recover from injuries and health conditions. For more information, please visit http://www.hydroworx.com.

– Courtesy of PRWeb

Researcher: Chowing Down On Watermelon Could Lower Blood Pressure

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watermelonBe sure to pick up a watermelon — or two — at your neighborhood farmers’ market.

It could save your life.

A new study by Florida State University Associate Professor Arturo Figueroa, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, found that watermelon could significantly reduce blood pressure in overweight individuals both at rest and while under stress.

“The pressure on the aorta and on the heart decreased after consuming watermelon extract,” Figueroa said.

The study started with a simple concept. More people die of heart attacks in cold weather because the stress of the cold temperatures causes blood pressure to increase and the heart has to work harder to pump blood into the aorta. That often leads to less blood flow to the heart.

Thus, people with obesity and high blood pressure face a higher risk for stroke or heart attack when exposed to the cold either during the winter or in rooms with low temperatures.

So, what might help their hearts?

It turned out that watermelon may be part of the answer.

Figueroa’s 12-week study focused on 13 middle-aged, obese men and women who also suffered from high blood pressure. To simulate cold weather conditions, one hand of the subject was dipped into 39 degree water (or 4 degrees Celsius) while Figueroa’s team took their blood pressure and other vital measurements.

Meanwhile, the group was divided into two. For the first six weeks, one group was given four grams of the amino acid L-citrulline and two grams of L-arginine per day, both from watermelon extract. The other group was given a placebo for 6 weeks.

Then, they switched for the second six weeks.

Participants also had to refrain from taking any medication for blood pressure or making any significant changes in their lifestyle, particularly related to diet and exercise, during the study.

The results showed that consuming watermelon had a positive impact on aortic blood pressure and other vascular parameters.

Notably, study participants showed improvements in blood pressure and cardiac stress while both at rest and while they were exposed to the cold water.

“That means less overload to the heart, so the heart is going to work easily during a stressful situation such as cold exposure,” Figueroa said.

Figueroa has conducted multiple studies on the benefits of watermelon. In the past, he examined how it impacts post-menopausal women’s arterial function and the blood pressure readings of adults with pre-hypertension.

– Submitted by Florida State University News

Blood Detective Fitness Secrets – Part 2

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By Dr. Michael Wald

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

More Exercise Equals Less Cancer

More and more studies are also showing that people who exercise regularly have a decreased risk of developing cancer, particularly colon, prostate and breast cancer. Exercise helps prevent colon cancer by speeding up the digestive process, which prevents food and toxins from sitting in the gut. It may also help prevent breast cancer by reducing fat deposits the body uses to create estrogen, which some tumors thrive on.

Blood Detective Bio-Marker Tests to consider: Colon Cancer Blood Test Screening, urinary indicant (a test of absorption), estradiole, estriole and estrone blood and/or saliva testing, testosterone measurements, SHBG, homocysteine, CRP and ferritin testing.

Exercise and Diabetes

diabeteswordBecause hard-working muscles use glucose for energy, exercise can also help prevent and control type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body stops responding to insulin, which normally facilitates the entry of glucose into cells. When glucose can’t get into cells, it remains in the bloodstream, where it can cause damage. When people exercise, their muscles use glucose for energy, which helps reduce blood sugar levels. Exercise also helps people control their weight, which is important because overweight people are at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Blood Detective Bio-Marker Tests to consider: Bio-impedience testing, C-peptide, serum insulin, homocysteine, CRP, RBC-magnesium, immune profile, autonomic nervous system evaluation, arterial stiffness testing and a comprehensive hormone evaluation.

Lose The Right Kind of Weight

There’s also one condition that everyone experiences that exercise helps to manage: aging. As you age, your body begins losing lean muscle mass, oxygen uptake ability and bone density. But this degeneration isn’t inevitable. Muscles, bones and the cardiovascular system respond to the stress of exercise by getting stronger.

Blood Detective Bio-Marker Tests to consider: Bio-impedance testing, lung spirometry evaluation, pulse ox and C02.

Exercise and Mood

Exercise has a mood-altering effect, relieving anxiety, raising energy levels and increasing sexual interest. It increases the body’s levels of serotonin, a chemical that causes good feelings and decreases incidents of depression, and beta-endorphine, a chemical that’s more potent than morphine. In fact, this release can occur just 12 minutes into a workout, which should keep you hooked long enough to reap the other rewards.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Blood Detective Fitness Secrets – Part 1

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By Dr. Michael Wald

exerciseballExercise is fun, feels good and helps fight disease: What more could baby bombers ask for?

In this article I will not only outline precisely why exercise is so important, but also how to really know whether you, as a baby bomber, will benefit in the long-term from your exercise efforts. At the end of each of the subsections below I have outlined for you special tests that I call, Blood Detective Bio-Markers. These are tests and evaluations that prove if your exercise efforts will likely improve your quality and length of life. Exercise performance often results in better fitness, but fitness alone without long-term benefits, such as reduced risk of disease and improved quality of life, your ability to do what you want to do would be an incomplete triumph.

Hidden Benefits of Exercise

Flabby flesh and unflattering bulges lead many people to start exercising, but the biggest benefits of exercise occur beneath the surface. Exercise boosts immunity, improves mood and helps stave off conditions such as heart disease, cancer, depression, osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes. It can also reverse some of the signs and symptoms of aging.

Blood Detective Bio-Marker Tests to consider: White blood cell functional test, bio-impedance test (measures percentages of muscle, water and fat in the body and metabolic rate), autonomic nervous system measurement (for stress effects upon the nervous system), bone density test (sonogram method not using radiation), HgA1c (measures blood sugar over several weeks in one measurement), C-peptide (measures insulin output),

The Heart Is The Key!

The heart is one of the biggest beneficiaries of regular exercise. It’s a muscle and, like skeletal muscles, it needs exercise to stay healthy. Exercise makes the heart stronger and more efficient, so it has to beat less to pump blood throughout the body. It also lowers the amount of fat and “bad” cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL) in the blood, clears out plaque that can accumulate in the arteries, helps reverse arteriosclerosis (artery hardening) and lessens your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Blood Detective Bio-Marker Tests to consider: Arterial Stiffness Test (measures hardening of arteries not blockage), Cardiobeam Tech. Evaluation (measures over a dozen cardiovascular parameters non-invasively), VAP Lipid Measurement (most accurate blood fats tests available).

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Discovered Dangers: Blood Work for Optimal Preventive Health

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By Dr. Michael Wald

doctorglobeBlood laboratory work is often an important part of assessing and diagnosing your current health issues. But more than just identifying current disease states, laboratory tests can be used preventively to identify sub-clinical diseases hidden from normal view that represent degenerative health problems early on, before they develop into full-blown diseases. New patients come to me frequently saying, “My doctor says my blood work is normal, but I still don’t feel well.” In over 20 years of clinical practice, I have discovered that most medical doctors rarely order anything beyond “routine” standard lab panels and only review the results of these for blatantly high or low abnormal values.

There are several problems with this approach. Although standard lab panels give a good general glimpse into your health, they do not include other important predictive factors for disease. For example, while cholesterol and triglyceride levels are helpful for considering heart disease, homocysteine and CRP are also predictors of heart health that are not included in a standard lab panel. A standard lab panel may not identify issues specific to your symptoms and current health concerns, which may require additional specialized tests that would require many doctors of different specialties to uncover.

The predominant medical health care approach is more of a disease-care approach, in which you are only treated once you have a disease like cancer, diabetes or atherosclerosis. In contrast, the blood detective approach that I have developed is to not used only to look for signs of obvious disease, but also to look at trends and clues that your blood offers. These aren’t included in superficial lab tests, even tests done by many medical specialists, but are found by comparing you to healthy people and not the “average” person.

The predominant medical health care approach is more of a disease-care approach, in which you are only treated once you have a disease like cancer, diabetes or atherosclerosis.

By comparing your lab values to healthier, narrower ranges and looking for hidden, abnormal results that are on the high or low end of normal, you are treated preventively, through nutritional supplementation and dietary and lifestyle changes, to improve your health, symptoms and reverse developing illness before it is far gone. It is always easier and smarter to prevent a problem than to treat it once it is a full-blown disaster.

Here’s an example: diabetes is increasingly prevalent among adolescents and adults. An internist or endocrinologist looks at a lab test known as HBA1C or glycosylated hemoglobin for an abnormally high value of 6.5 percent or higher to diagnose and treat a patient for diabetes. In my practice, anyone with an HBA1C greater than 5 percent is placed on a special health plan and nutritional supplements that promote weight loss, lower blood sugar and support healthy insulin production and kidney function–reversing the early or midstream diabetic problem.

As another example, many women come to me complaining of weight gain, difficulty losing weight and fatigue. Their medical doctors have ordered a CBC to check their blood for anemia, TSH and T3 to check thyroid function and are told that all is “normal” and there is nothing for them to do. In my assessment, I would not only check CBC, but other important blood markers to diagnose any of over a dozen different types of anemia’s that could be the culprit. I would consider total thyroid hormone, T3, T4 and TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone), as well as other important hormones that are directly involved with healthy thyroid function, like the hormones testosterone, progesterone and DHEA. I would review these results not only for obvious abnormal highs or lows, but for sub-clinical highs or lows, so that I could offer treatment both for obvious disease and deficiency and to prevent discovered trends and patterns leading toward disease and deficiency.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

5 Most Common Types of Blood Disorders in Children To Look For

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humanbodyBlood is the life maintaining thing of body, which circulates through our heart, veins, capillaries, and arteries. Blood caries away the carbon dioxide and waste matter, and brings electrolytes, nourishment, vitamins, antibodies, oxygen, heat, and hormones to the body tissues.

As the functions of blood are complex and many, they are so many diseases that need proper care by physicians. So many blood disorders are taking place in children. The most common blood disorders in children include bleeding disorders, anaemia, blood cancer, Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, Haemophilia, leukaemia, and Thrombocytopenia.

1. Anaemia:

This is one of the most common blood disorders in children, which occurs if healthy red blood cells level in the body decreased to very low rate. This may cause serious health problems since red blood vessels contain the haemoglobin that carries oxygen to body organs. Anaemia may cause so many complications like stress and fatigue.

2. Thalassemia:

Thalassemia affects people of African, South Asian, and Mediterranean, who are marked by the short lived red blood cells. Thalassemia is two types one is major and other is minor. Major is also known as Cooley’s anaemia, which is a severe form of anaemia. This is one of deadly blood disorders in children.

Red blood cells can be rapidly destroyed and the iron will be deposited in vital organs and skin. Kids who have thalassemia are unable to make one of two main protein chains, which form oxygen-haemoglobin carrying substance in the red blood cells.

3. Hemophilia:

Children who are suffering with this condition are unable to produce factors or proteins that are needed for the blood clotting. Due to this, exceed bleeding can be possible even for minor injuries. Due to the defective genes located on X chromosome, many sufferers are male only.

4. Sickle Cell Disease:

This is an inherited disease which is caused due to an abnormal form of the oxygen-haemoglobin carrying substance in the red blood cells. If the red blood cells contain abnormal haemoglobin, then it releases oxygen, and the haemoglobin becomes distorted and causes normally round blood cell in order to assume the sickle shape.

These types of sickle shaped blood cells will obstruct the blood flow in the small capillaries and the defective cells destruction can lead to anaemia in kids. Kids who are born with this blood disorder suffer from so many symptoms like stroke, pain, and increased infections.

5. Iron Deficiency:

Iron is the important mineral that is needed for the good health and proper functionality of the body. Each and every red blood cell of body contain iron its haemoglobin. But a lack of this mineral in blood cells can cause iron deficiency in children. This is very common form of blood disorders in children who are with nutritional deficiency.

Victoria Armstrong, Author of this article writes for www.ehealthyblog.com. E Healthy Blog provides you the complete information, latest news, and tips on Health. Also provides information on various diseases like Blood Disorders, Cancers, Diabetes, Heart Diseases, Allergies, Skin Diseases, Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Child Health, and many more.

Blood Pressure Lowering Medicine Chest: Your Local Farmer’s Market!

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By Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, LDN

saladheartsmallSpring is in the air, the flowers are blooming, the birds are chirping, and the grass is getting green, green, green… all signs that summer is right around the corner. The warm weather is also a signal that the cornucopia of locally grown fruits and vegetables is also just around the corner at the nearest farmer’s market. Why favor farmers’ markets over the grocery store? There are several main reasons: the food is fresher (healthier), the food is seasonal, the food is locally grown (you support local farmers) and you get a better variety of foods. Make sure you frequent your local farmer’s market often, the ultimate health food store!

Farmers’ markets are also a veritable drugstore for blood pressure lowering superfoods. When shopping for these superfoods, here are the three blood pressure lowering mineral superstars you need to keep in mind: potassium, magnesium and calcium. How do you choose the food highest in these minerals? Simple–I have included my “Mining for Minerals Charts” from my new book, Blood Pressure Down. Cut them out and carry them to the Farmer’s Market and when you see these foods, buy them, eat them and watch your blood pressure drop!
Mining for Minerals:

See it, Eat it Pocket Charts©

For Potassium
Super-High* Foods
Cantaloupe
Casaba Melon
Honeydew Melon
Artichokes
Beet greens
Cooked Spinach
Swiss Chard
White Beans
Low Sodium V8
Prunes
* Each food contains over 400 mg potassium per 1/2 cup serving

Very High** Foods
Apricots
Bananas
Dried Fruits
Brussels Sprouts
Pumpkin
Cooked Mushrooms
Chocolate (dark)
Squash
Potatoes
Kiwi
** Each food contains over 250 mg potassium per 1/2 cup serving

For Magnesium
Super-High* Foods
Cooked Spinach
White Beans
Corn
Swiss Chard
Purslane
Dry-roasted unsalted almonds
Halibut
Quinoa
Brown Rice
*Each food contains 100 mg magnesium per typical serving size

Very High** Foods
Brewed Espresso
Clams
Brewed Coffee
Peanut Butter (low sodium)
Avocado
Fat Free Yogurt
Kidney and Pinto Beans
Dry Roasted unsalted peanuts
Baked Potato (with skin)
** Each food contains 50 mg magnesium per typical serving size

For Calcium
Super-High* Foods
Non-fat Yogurt
Soy Milk
Fortified Fat Free Milk
Collard Greens
Cheeses: low sodium
Parmesan Cheese
Swiss Cheese
Light Mozzarella
Low Fat Cottage Cheese
Part Skim Ricotta 1/2 cup
*Each food contains over 300 mg calcium per typical serving size

Very High** Foods
Tofu
Canned Salmon
Edamame
Bok Choy
Blackstrap Molasses
** Each food contains over 150 mg calcium per typical serving size

– Excerpted from Blood Pressure Down by Janet Bond Brill, Ph.D., R.D., LDN

– Article submitted by Kate Bandos, KSB Promotions