Is Soda A Drug? A Nutritionist’s Perspective – Part 2

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By Christie Korth, CHC

Continued from part 1 of the article…..

soda* 45 minutes: Your body ups your dopamine production stimulating the pleasure centers of your brain. This is physically the same way heroin works, by the way.

* 60 Minutes: The phosphoric acid binds calcium, magnesium and zinc in your lower intestine, providing a further boost in metabolism. This is compounded by high doses of sugar and artificial sweeteners also increasing the urinary excretion of calcium.

* 60 Minutes: The caffeine’s diuretic properties come into play. It is now assured that you’ll evacuate the bonded calcium, magnesium and zinc that were headed to your bones as well as sodium, electrolytes and water. Not only is the soda an “empty” simple carbohydrate, it robs your body of many other essential vitamins and minerals, as well.

* 60 Minutes: Pay attention to your bladder, by now it is almost certain you have had to urinate as a result of your kidneys trying to excrete this mystery substance as soon as possible. When your body does not recognize a substance, it is very quick to send the appropriate signals to your body to digest rapidly. This is viewed as a state of emergency. It is as if the body is saying to your brain, “Help-Get this out of here fast-it’s doing us not good at all and it’s invading our nutrition supply!” Hence the need to use the bathroom an hour after soda consumption. While you were in the bathroom, you have now lost all of the water that was in the Soda. Sadly, not before infusing it with valuable nutrients your body could have used for vital functions. Such as maintaining the ability to hydrate ones system or build strong bones and teeth. This is how soda drinking can lead to osteoporosis. The phosphates in the soda leech the calcium out of your blood and bones.

* After the fiasco in the bathroom, you will surely be overjoyed to learn that this will all be followed by a caffeine crash in the next few hours. (An added bonus: Count on the caffeine crash to occur in as little as two hours or less if you’re a smoker.) But, hey, have another Soda; it’ll make you feel better. And so another ride sugar on the sugar highway begins.

3 Quick Tips for Avoiding A Ride on The Soda Highway:

1. Drink plenty of water. If water is your beverage of choice, after awhile, you will stop craving sugary drinks. If you can replace one cup of soda per day with a cup of water you have the right idea. Over time, this will allow you to quit or cut down on your soda consumption.

2. Make a Pact: Make your own soda. If you want soda, only allow yourself to have it if you allow yourself to make it. For example, try club soda, with agave nectar, fresh lemon and lime juice and presto: you have made your own Sprite. Don’t love Sprite? Try sparkling seltzer with fruit juice for a fruity soda.

3. Occasionally treat yourself to organic soda. Stop buying soda at home and have it only at special occasions. Make sure everyone in your house adheres to this rule, so there is no cheating. Watch how much your consumption dwindles when you stop purchasing it!

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Is Soda A Drug? A Nutritionist’s Perspective – Part 1

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By Christie Korth, CHC

sodabottleHello everyone! I’m Christie Korth your favorite, fun-loving holistic nutrition expert, author, and founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling. My mission today is to permanently change your relationship with soda. Why is your relationship with soda so important? We know Coca Cola took the cocaine out of Soda almost a hundred years ago, but surprisingly, as far as your body can tell….not too much has changed. Confused? Take a look to see how your body reacts to America’s most consumed beverage and how the reaction is similar in the way your body reacts to one of the most addictive, deadly drugs….

Have you ever wondered why Soda comes with a smile? It’s because it gets you high. Yes, in 2013, despite the absence of cocaine, soda junkies everywhere are unsuspectingly subjecting themselves to a “high”. By simply drinking what is known as a staple beverage in the Standard American Diet (or SAD, as I prefer to call it) we are playing a deadly game of Russian Rulet with our health and exposing ourselves to diseases the more that we indulge in this commodity.

By now, I am sure you are wondering what I am talking about. What is the good old culprit responsible for these highs? It’s none other than….Sugar! But- this is not just any old sugar that we are talking about here. It is the mother of all sugars…high fructose corn syrup! I suppose the good folks at Coke figured, why not try something cheaper, and perhaps switch to a substance that was obviously not illegal. And so voila, after near 100 years of consumption, we have an alarming rate of childhood and adolescent onset diabetes, hypoglycemia, obesity, digestive disorders, skin conditions, osteoporosis, candida, cancer. These conditions are all linked to access sugar consumption. If you are an avid soda drinker, your life depends on this. Please read on.

Every day, millions of Americans reach for a coke, some in hopes of curing that three o’clock lull one may experience after lunch when their energy levels feel zapped, while others have reported routinely drinking up to three liters per day! More alarmingly, children drink these beverages in school and at home.

A child’s body is no match for the sugar rush that soda produces. This seemingly innocent little routine has taken most of the public by storm, sending people down the Diabetes-Hypoglycemia Highway at full speed. The end result riding down the sugar highway is devastation in one’s health, yet the beverage companies continue to receive advertising grants in the form of government funding toppling in the billions. Meanwhile, health promoting advertisements, such as the FDA’s Healthy Food Pyramids slogan for “5 A Day” (signifying that one should consume a combination of five fresh fruits and vegetables a day.) received little or no media attention. No wonder the public is in the dark. Everyone has been brainwashed by advertisements to eat a food we know is not healthy.

What Happens To Your Body When You Drink A Soda?

* In The First 10 minutes: 10 teaspoons of sugar hit your system. (100% of your recommended daily intake by the FDA) You don’t immediately vomit from the overwhelming sweetness because phosphoric acid cuts the flavor allowing you to keep it down. Clever trick by the scientists that make soda! Insert twilight zone music here: “do-do do-do do-do do-do”…I believe my food should made by a chef or purchased from an organic farmer-not scientists. Chemicals are not food. This is common sense that is often overlooked.

* 20 minutes: Your blood sugar spikes, causing an insulin burst. Your liver responds to this by turning any sugar it can get its hands on into fat. (There’s plenty of that at this particular moment)

* 40 minutes: Caffeine absorption is complete. Your pupils dilate, your blood pressure rises, as a response your livers dumps more sugar into your bloodstream. The adenosine receptors in your brain are now blocked preventing drowsiness. Here comes your sugar high!

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article…..

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Put Down That Soda Or I’ll Shoot! – Part 2

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

sodaContinued from part 1 of this article…..

Which foods contain large amounts of sugar?

Sugar can be found in a wide variety of foods ranging from fruits to candy. It is important to determine the source of the sugar in your diet. Most of our sugar should come from fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, which contain natural sugars and also include vitamins and minerals.

Added sugar is found in items such as cakes, candy bars, sodas, and fruit juices. These items contain additional sweeteners in addition to the naturally occurring sugars. Foods with added sugars tend to be high in calories and low in vitamins and minerals.

What are the negative health effects of eating too much sugar?

A diet high in sugar can lead to weight gain, diabetes, nutrient deficiencies, cavities, and dental plaque.

Diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, loss of mobility, dependence on insulin and heart disease.

#3. Switching from sodas and sports drinks might initially foster some resistance because sodas are readily available everywhere, their enticing advertising brain washes us into thinking we’re cool if we drink them, and choosing an alternative requires that we go off automatic and think about our health. The solution: get creative and praise your family for making better health choices every time they do. Praise trumps a soda anytime.

– Choose infused water over sodas when shopping or dining out. Add mint, lemon, grapefruit or lime for a kick or use sliced cucumber or herbs for a more mellow taste.

– Select iced tea, (green, black, herbal, spicy, sweet) but not the bottled sugary, flavored ones. Pick a naturally brewed, unsweetened iced tea.

– Use seltzer or club soda with a splash of fruit juice for flavor and color.

– Choose iced coffee and make it with almond milk for sweetener.

– Store-bought smoothies and fruit drinks can be loaded with sugar, so make your own at home with ice, sugar free sparkling water, berries or melon and chopped mint.

– Low sodium broth is also a treat hot or iced in the summer.

Invite your family to participate in the switch from sodas to healthy drinks. Provide prizes for the most creative concoctions and post the recipes on your Face Book page. Be proud when anyone close to you makes a healthy choice and share the success with others. This one modification can save your family members future pain and disability.

– Kac Young , a former television director and producer, earned her PhD. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. While earning her Doctorates in Natural Health and Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University. She is the author of 10 books. Her flagship company, Heart Easy, is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and great taste. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding. Learn more http://www.HeartEasy.com

Put Down That Soda Or I’ll Shoot! – Part 1

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

sodabottleGot your attention? Good because this is important. Drinking sodas can lead to death and disease, period. Just look at the data: A new study from Europe suggests that, Drinking one 12-ounce sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by 22%.

• A recent study from France found a direct link between drinking diet soda (and regular soda) and increased risk for type 2 diabetes in women.

• Researchers say the increased risk of diabetes among sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumers in Europe mirrors that seen in a meta-analysis conducted in North America, which found a 25% increased risk of type 2 diabetes associated with a 12-oz daily increment of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption.

• A larger, international study, reports that slurping back large amounts of sugary beverages was associated with an increased body-mass index (BMI), which in turn was linked with BMI-related deaths from diabetes, CVD, and cancer.

Specifically, the researchers found that in 2010, 132 000 deaths from diabetes, 44 000 deaths from CVD, and 6000 deaths from cancer in the world could be attributed to drinking sugar-sweetened soft drinks, fruit juice, or sports beverages.

Hellooooooo! Aren’t those statistics staggering? And yet, there are those among us who want to fight for the right to kill themselves with sugary soft drinks! Don’t be one of them.
“But my kids love sodas,” you cry. Well if you love your kids you’ll give them something different than the high fructose, corn-syrup infused OTC sodas, pops and juice drinks that cause disease.
The American Heart Association recommends that you consume no more than 450 calories (36 ounces) of sugar-sweetened beverages a week.

In the US, the watchdog group Centers for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has petitioned authorities to regulate sugar-sweetened beverages, saying they are hazardous to human health and need to be regulated.

Convinced yet?

Here’s how you can start the switch at home. It’s a simple 3-step process that can reduce your family’s vulnerability to type 2 diabetes, cardio vascular disease, cancer and obesity.

#1. Summon your family and tell them about the sugars and corn syrup hidden in sodas. Pull up this site and talk about it: http://www.sugarstacks.com/beverages.htm

#2. Discuss these points:

How is sugar used by the body?

Sugar gives the body energy. Actually, it is the only source of energy for the brain and red blood cells. Each gram of sugar contains 4 calories. Unlike complex carbohydrates, sugars are digested quickly and are easily broken down into glucose, which is then used for energy. If a lot of sugar is eaten at one time, blood sugar levels can spike, which can increase the risk for developing diabetes.

How much sugar do I need in my diet?

Limiting the amount of sugar in the diet is important to your health. Sugar should account for fewer than 10% of your daily calories. This equates to 200 calories of sugar (50g) for a person eating 2000 calories a day.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Kac Young , a former television director and producer, earned her PhD. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. While earning her Doctorates in Natural Health and Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University. She is the author of 10 books. Her flagship company, Heart Easy, is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and great taste. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding. Learn more http://www.HeartEasy.com

The Case For Drinking More Water

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watercupFrom Your Health Journal…..A very good article from the Dallas Morning News via AP entitled America’s consumption of drinking water outpaces old favorite soda. With obesity on the rise, and many people suffering from obesity related illness, it is refreshing to read how water has made a strong combat as the number one drink in the United States. Americans now drink around 44 gallons of soda a year, a 17 % drop from the peak in 1998. Over the same time, the average amount of water people drink has increased 38 % to about 58 gallons a year. Bottled water has led that growth, with consumption nearly doubling to 21 gallons a year. Soda has been blamed in many cases as a major contributor to obesity, although it really is a combination of many factors that contribute to the weight gain. Water, a non calorie beverage is an important contributor to good health, assisting with digestion, lubricating the body, removing toxins, and good for the skin. Please visit the Dallas Morning News web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

It wasn’t too long ago that America had a love affair with soda. Now, an old flame has the country’s heart.

As New York City grapples with the legality of a ban on the sale of large cups of soda and other sugary drinks at some businesses, one thing is clear: soda’s run as the nation’s beverage of choice has fizzled.

In its place? A favorite for much of history: Plain old H2O.

For more than two decades, soda was the No. 1 drink in the U.S. with per capita consumption peaking in 1998 at 54 gallons a year, according industry tracker Beverage Digest. Americans drank just 42 gallons a year of water at the time.

But over the years, as soda increasingly came under fire for fueling the nation’s rising obesity rates, water quietly rose to knock it off the top spot.

Americans now drink an average of 44 gallons of soda a year, a 17 percent drop from the peak in 1998. Over the same time, the average amount of water people drink has increased 38 percent to about 58 gallons a year. Bottled water has led that growth, with consumption nearly doubling to 21 gallons a year.

Stephen Ngo, a civil defense attorney, quit drinking soda a year ago when he started running triathlons, and wanted a healthier way to quench his thirst.

Ngo, 34, has a Brita filter for tap water and also keeps his pantry stocked with cases of bottled water.

“It might just be the placebo effect or marketing, but it tastes crisper,” said Ngo, who lives in Miami.

The trend reflects Americans’ ever-changing tastes; it wasn’t too far back in history that tap water was the top drink.

But in the 1980s, carbonated soft drinks overtook tap as the most popular drink, with Coca-Cola and PepsiCo putting their marketing muscle behind their colas with celebrity endorsements from the likes of pop star Michael Jackson and comedian Bill Cosby.

Americans kept drinking more of the carbonated, sugary drink for about a decade. Then, soda’s magic started to fade: Everyone from doctors to health advocates to government officials were blaming soft drinks for making people fat. Consumption started declining after hitting a high in the late 1990s.

At the same time, people started turning to bottled water as an alternative. Its popularity was helped by the emergence of single-serve bottles that were easy to carry around.

Until then, bottled water had mainly been sold in “big jugs and coolers” for people who didn’t trust their water supply, said John Sicher, publisher of Beverage Digest.

The new soft drink-like packaging helped fast-track bottled water’s growth past milk and beer. In fact, the amount of bottled water Americans drink has risen nearly every year for more than two decades, while the estimates of how much tap water people drink has fluctuated up and down during that time. When taken together, water finally overtook soda in 2008, according to Beverage Digest. (It’s difficult to track how much tap water people drink and how much is used for other things like washing dishes, so experts estimate consumption.)

To read the complete article…..Click here

NYC Soda Ban Overturned?

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sodabottleFrom Your Health Journal…..”Just wanted to follow up with a very interesting article from March 11th in Newsday written by Ken Schachter entitled NYC soda ban: State judge Milton Tingling overturns controversial ban on sugary drinks. I encourage you all to visit the Newsday web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. This article is the next chapter on a topic we have discussed here a few times. In some cities in the United States, there has been discussion regarding taxing and/or banning various soft drinks. First, the image on the Newsday article brought a grin to my face. It is an image of a man drinking a big gulp soda with a sign in his hand that says “Hands Off My Bladder.” It was humorous to me, but also important. There are two sides to this issue. Some people feel that government has no business in telling people how to eat or drink. Others say they do, as health care costs may go through the roof in the future. But, recently, a State Supreme Court judge in Manhattan Monday blocked New York City’s proposed ban on jumbo sugary drinks. It appears that Mayor Bloomberg’s office will appeal this decision. This is going to be an interesting debate. I am not quite sure which side I agree with, but the outcome will surely be followed in many areas of the United States. Thank you Newsday for posting this content.”

From the article…..

A State Supreme Court judge in Manhattan Monday blocked New York City’s proposed ban on jumbo sugary drinks, which was scheduled to take effect Tuesday.

In a Twitter posting, the Bloomberg administration promptly vowed to appeal the decision.

“We are confident the measure will ultimately be upheld,” the tweet said.

The controversial edict championed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg would have barred businesses that get letter grades from the city’s health department from selling sugary drinks in sizes greater than 16 ounces, in a bid to tackle the city’s 58 percent obesity rate.

The American Beverage Association and other industry groups sued to block the rules.

The city “has the ability to do this and the obligation to try to help,” Bloomberg had said last month.

Some 127,000 Hudson Valley residents commute to Manhattan to work, according to Census Bureau figures from 2009.

Before the judge’s ruling short-circuited the city’s plans, some Westchester County residents warned that the city’s actions could trigger an uprising by fans of supersized beverages.

“It’s the beginning of a revolution if you ask me,” John Porrotta of Yonkers said. “It’s like Prohibition again.”

The 29-year-old pizza parlor worker said New York City’s restrictions also could send borough residents in search of giant drinks across the suburban frontier.

“I mean people come up here to buy cigarettes, so why not come up here to get the sugar as well?” he said.

Another Yonkers resident, Linda Bona, 65, agreed that those seeking giant beverages would not be denied.

“I believe people will definitely cross the border to get sugar,” she said. “They go where they want to to get what they want. They go the whole nine yards.”

To read the complete article…..Click here

Sugar Ban?

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sodabottleFrom Your Health Journal…..”An interesting story by Felicity Duncan for a web site I like called Money Web about sugar bans. This blog has discussed many times how a great start to lose weight is to watch liquid consumption. For many, 25-40% of an individuals diet is directly from liquid. Soda, juice, and flavored milks taste great, but add many unnecessary calories. Nothing wrong with drinking them once in a while if you like it, but moderation is the key. In big cities in the United States, local governments are trying to ban, restrict or limit ‘sugar’ filled soft drinks. The rationale behind these restrictions is that the average 500ml soft drink contains more than the recommended daily allowance of sugar – the American Heart Association recommends that women consume no more than 6 teaspoons of sugar a day (about 20g), and men no more than 9 (about 36g), but the average can of cool drink contains over 10 teaspoons of sugar (about 40g). Since Americans routinely “super-size” their drink orders because it’s cheap (usually the cost per millilitre is lower the bigger your drink is), advocates of the ban argue that, by keeping sodas small, it will reduce the amount of empty calories New Yorkers consume in liquid form. Please visit the Money Web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. I found it to be well written and informative. I will visit this site often, as they seem to have some great health stories.”

From the article…..

Moves to cut the sugar in soft drinks to curb obesity.

In the last few months, an interesting health controversy has been brewing in the United States – anti-obesity advocates and health lobbyists have been trying to get officials to ban or disincentivise high levels of sugar in soft drinks and other beverages, because they believe that the sweet stuff in drinkables is a key culprit in the rise of obesity and its associated health problems.

According to advocates of interventions, sugary drinks have a pernicious effect on waistlines. Many people consume lots of extra kilojoules every day in the form of sweetened beverages. In South Africa, for example, children consume large quantities of sweetened drinks; in one study among grade 4 and grade 7 kids in the Western Cape, learners consumed an average of 783ml of soft drinks per day. More generally, estimates put South Africans’ sugar consumption at about 31kgs per person per year (about 84g a day), about half of which comes in the form of sweetened beverages.

However, these beverages do not promote a feeling of fullness, so people don’t eat less to make up for the kilojoules they drink in the form of sugar. The result is that they end up taking in far too many kilojoules and piling on weight. In addition, the consumption of too much added sugar also promotes poor nutrition, increased levels of circulating blood fat, and tooth decay. The solution, say advocates of sugar bans in the US, is to force or persuade manufacturers to put less sugar in their products in the first place, and they have been taking various actions to see this achieved.

In an unusually bold move, a lobbying group has presented the US Food and Drug Administration (the body which regulates food labels and ingredients) with a petition signed by Harvard School of Public Health researchers, the Boston Public Health Commission, and others urging it to regulate the amount of sugar that is permitted in beverages. The petition is unlikely to succeed, but the fact that it was submitted highlights a growing momentum of advocacy around banning sweetened drinks.

Predictably enough, the whole brouhaha was kick-started in New York City when mayor Michael Bloomberg approved a citywide ban on large sugary drinks, including super-sized soft drinks and large, sweet frothy latte-style drinks. The ban, which comes into effect in a few months, will mean that fast food chains, coffee shops, and restaurants in NYC will not be allowed to sell sugary beverages in servings larger than 500ml.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Soda Tax Could Help Reduce Childhood Obesity In Nebraska

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sodabottleFrom Your Health Journal…..”An interesting article from the Star Herald out of Nebraska written by Sara Giboney. The title of the article is called Soda Tax Could Help Reduce Childhood Obesity In Nebraska. We have written here quite often about the soda taxes in big cities like NYC and LA. Obesity has been in the news a great deal over the last few months, as many government officials have realized the high costs in the future that will be needed to assist many people who are unhealthy due to obesity. With the generous support of the media, who has discussed this in great detail, small changes are starting to take place nationwide. Now, the University of Nebraska at Kearney could play an integral role in helping Nebraska schools reduce childhood obesity. LB447, which was introduced in the Nebraska Legislature by state Senator Bill Avery, would tax soda and create the Nebraska Healthy Kids Fund, which aims to help schools implement wellness programs. What a nice gesture at the local level to help combat childhood obesity. It will be interesting to see how this tax will be received, as there are those who are in favor, those who are opposed. But, change is needed to help fight childhood obesity, as many are worried this could be the first generation of children whose life expectancy may be shorter than their parents. Please visit the Star Herald’s web site to view the complete article.”

From the article…..

The University of Nebraska at Kearney could play an integral role in helping Nebraska schools reduce childhood obesity.

LB447, which was introduced in the Nebraska Legislature by state Sen. Bill Avery, would tax soda and create the Nebraska Healthy Kids Fund, which aims to help schools implement wellness programs.

If the Nebraska Healthy Kids Fund receives funding, UNK will be responsible for collecting, analyzing and developing school-based reports for weight and fitness data.

“It’s taking the best practices from what we’ve learned here in Kearney as what seems to have been effective in decreasing the prevalence of overweight and obesity and preventing excessive weight gain and trying to implement those strategies in other schools across the state,” said Kate Heelan, professor of health, physical education and recreation and the Kearney Public Schools wellness program evaluator.

UNK has worked with KPS collecting weight and fitness data on students.

KPS has implemented new physical education curriculum, put salad bars into schools, began offering a wellness program for overweight families and more.

Lincoln Public Schools also has implemented a wellness program and has been collecting data.

Dr. Bob Rauner, chair of the Nebraska Medical Association’s public health committee and co-chair of the Nebraska Academy of Family Physicians’ Legislative Committee, has been working with Lincoln Public Schools to reduce childhood obesity with the help of a Carol M. White Physical Education Program grant, the same grant KPS used to implement its wellness program.

“This bill came out as a way to sustain what we’re doing in Lincoln and Kearney, but also roll it out to the rest of the state,” Rauner said.

“We want to make it happen everywhere because it’s working.”

Rauner said every school district in Nebraska has a wellness policy, but there isn’t a mandate that says the schools have to implement wellness programming.

“In Lincoln and Kearney, it (wellness policy) didn’t just sit on the shelf, we actually did things to change the policy,” he said.

In Lincoln, some schools had eliminated recess to create more time for academics, Rauner said.

“Kids need physical activity, and it actually helps their academics when they’re more active,” Rauner said. “Now, all schools have to have recess, they have to have physical activity breaks.”

Data collection will be the first step to help school districts across the state implement their own wellness policies.

If the bill is approved, beginning in 2014, UNK will receive $500,000 a year as part of the Nebraska Healthy Kids Fund.

The funds will be used to develop and maintain a statewide database for weight and fitness data on students in Nebraska public schools.

To read the full article…..Click here

Dental Experts Want Labels On Soft Drinks

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childteethFrom Your Health Journal…..”A great article recently out of Australia in the Border Mail written by Rachel Wells entitled Dental Experts Want Labels On Soft Drinks. Recently, this blog discussed what they were doing in the United States and Britain with regards to taxing sugared drinks, commonly known as ‘fat tax’ – in an effort to cut back obesity in children and adults. In New York City, the Mayor also wanted to reduce portion size of soft drinks in various locations throughout the city. Of course, like most things, the feedback has been mixed. Now, out of Australia, dental experts have called for all soft drinks to carry warning labels declaring the risk of tooth decay. Like most parts of the world, many children are consuming 3 or more soft drinks a day, which not only increases their waistline, but can cause possible tooth decay. Sadly, a good portion of a child’s calories is not from liquids. In fact some studies have shown that 20-40% of a child’s diet is from liquid – and in most cases, from liquid candy. So, what is the answer? Cutting out sugary drinks completely does not work, and sometimes makes children more anxious to drink more of it, but moderation is the key. Parents should set limits on liquid consumption of unhealthy drinks. Now the real question, will labeling of soft drinks have a positive impact on liquid consumption? Time will tell. Please visit the Border Mail web site (link provided below) to view the complete article.”

From the article…..

Australian dental experts have called for all soft drinks to carry warning labels declaring the risk of tooth decay.

The call, backed by new research from the University of Adelaide and supported by Australia’s peak dental bodies, comes after a new study revealed some Australian children were consuming three or more sugared drinks a day.

The study, published this month in the American Journal of Public Health, also found tooth decay and cavities were ”significantly associated with greater sugar-sweetened beverage consumption”.

It found 56 per cent of Australian children aged five to 16 consumed at last one sugared drink a day and that 13 per cent consumed three or more sugared drinks a day.

The number of decayed, missing and filled baby teeth was 46 per cent higher among children who consumed three or more sweet drinks a day, compared with children who did not consume any.

”Consistent evidence has shown that high acidity of many sweetened drinks, particularly soft drinks and sports drinks, can be a factor in dental erosion, as well as the sugar itself contributing to tooth decay,” says the lead author of the study, Dr Jason Armfield, from the Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health at the University of Adelaide.

He said: ”If health authorities decide that warnings are needed for sweet drinks, the risk to dental health should be included.”

The calls were backed by the Australian Dental Association and the Australian Dental and Oral Health Therapists’ Association. ”I think the profession as a whole would support any labelling that would highlight the risk of tooth decay from soft drinks and beverages that contain high sugar content and are acidic,” said ADA Victorian branch president Dr Gordon Burt.

”Certainly the message doesn’t seem to be disseminating through the population as much as we’d like it to now.”

The National Health and Medical Research Council is due to update its dietary guidelines in February. They are expected to include recommendations to ”limit intake of foods and drinks containing added sugars … In particular, limit sugar-sweetened drinks.” The guidelines currently advise consumers to ”moderate” intake.

To read the full article…..Click here

Saying Adiós To Chips And Soda

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From Your Health Journal…..”The Your Health Journal tries to cover all areas of health, from giving health tips, causes for obesity, and health headlines. The health headline reviewed in this story is from the New York Daily News, which has an amazing online presence, with great articles. I encourage you to visit their site using the link below. This story discusses how for the first time in years, Americans are slimming down, but fortunately, not in the Hispanic community. Sadly in the US, 17% of children (about 12.5 million people) are still obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And more than a third of American adults are obese, with Hispanics trailing only African-Americans in this category. The Hispanic community is more prone to develop obesity or diabetes than a non Hispanic white individual. Even with these alarming statistics, companies are still branding fattening products that appeal to the Hispanic community, all which will continue to contribute to obesity. Changes is needed, as some community leaders what the schools to promote more physical activity, cut back on eating unhealthy, and providing more farmer markets in many areas. America’s obesity crisis adds $190 billion to the national medical bill and kills some 400,000 people every year. To end this costly suffering, public-health officials must take steps to whittle down our waistlines.”

From the article…..

Hispanics are succumbing to obesity and diabetes at alarming rates

Are Americans finally slimming down? They just might be — but if you’re Hispanic, there’s little reason to cheer, as obesity remains a stubborn problem in our community. It is a problem exacerbated by the foods we eat and the sodas we drink.

The news last week was that several cities around the country reported that obesity rates among children were declining — albeit slightly — for the first time in some 30 years. But 17% of children (about 12.5 million people) are still obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And more than a third of American adults are obese, with Hispanics trailing only African-Americans in this category.

Indeed, the numbers for Hispanics are troubling. Fully 78% of Mexican-American women are overweight or obese — compared to 60% of non-Hispanic white women.

In general, Hispanic Americans are 1.2 times more likely to be obese than non-Hispanic whites. And in 2009 to 2010, Mexican American children were nearly twice as likely to be overweight as non-Hispanic white youth.

As Dr. Roberto Madrid of United Healthcare said of a recent report card of America’s health, “We saw betterment in some measures among the Hispanic community . . . But diabetes and obesity rates take away from those betterments.”

Indeed, more than 10% of Hispanics over the age of 20 have type 2 diabetes. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics are 50% more likely to die from the disease. Hispanics also have higher rates of kidney disease, which can be caused by diabetes.

Sugar-sweetened drinks are among the chief culprits for America’s burgeoning obesity epidemic — but that hardly matters when there’s a profit to be made.

PepsiCo recently hired a cultural branding specialist. The Colombian actress Sofia Vergara was featured in Diet Pepsi’s most recent Super Bowl commercial. And the company now sponsors extensive programming on Univision, a top Spanish-language TV station.

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