New Study Shows Combatting Childhood Obesity In Schools Is Working

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

obesityResearch Finds the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program Reduces Prevalence of Childhood Obesity.

According to a recently published study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal, Preventing Chronic Disease, schools can win the fight against childhood obesity. The study found that the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program is an important means of supporting schools in reducing students’ rates of obesity.

Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in California Schools, 2006 – 2012, is the first peer-reviewed journal article published about the Healthy Schools Program’s impact on child obesity rates.

An analysis of 281 schools in California that participated in the Program from 2006-2012 concludes that the Program is “an effective model for addressing childhood obesity among engaged schools,” and that meaningful participation in the Program is linked to reductions in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among students in high-need schools.

Ten years ago, the Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association founded the Alliance for a Healthier Generation with the goal of reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity, and this study confirms the organization is delivering on its mission and that healthy school environments are having an effect on student weight.

“It’s encouraging to see the proven positive impact of the Healthy Schools Program on childhood obesity. Over the past ten years, the Alliance involved all stakeholders ‒ schools, companies, communities, healthcare professionals and families. The combination of commitment and cooperation has made the difference,” said President Bill Clinton.

kidsexercisevector“This study is evidence of our 2005 dream realized. While we know we have much more work to do to reverse the tide of obesity, we’re showing signs of success through the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.

The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program, which was launched in 2006 with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provides schools with a framework, assessment and action plan, as well as virtual and onsite training and technical assistance and access to national experts to help them create sustainable healthy change. While the study looked at schools in California, the Program serves more than 29,000 schools nationally, the majority of which are high-need ‒ 40% or more of a school’s students receive free or reduced price lunch.

The study demonstrates the power of providing high-quality training and technical assistance to help schools make policy and system changes that improve children’s access to healthy foods and physical activity. The more that schools engaged with the Healthy Schools Program, and the longer they engaged, the greater reductions they saw in student rates of obesity. For example, for each additional year of exposure to an Alliance national advisor, schools saw a nearly 2% decline in student rates of overweight and obesity.

“Healthy school environments are critical to ensuring that every child grows up at a healthy weight and to RWJF’s goal of building a nationwide Culture of Health,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “This study reinforces the critical role that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program can play in making a healthy school the norm and not the exception in the United States. We are proud of our commitment to initiate and expand the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program over the past decade, and we look forward to continued progress in our joint efforts to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic.”

“We’re pleased the findings confirm that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program is delivering on our mission: to reduce the prevalence of childhood obesity,” said Dr. Howell Wechsler, CEO of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. “Reaching more than 17 million students across the country and growing, we will continue to positively impact children’s health on a national scale.”

About the Alliance for a Healthier Generation
The Alliance for a Healthier Generation empowers kids to develop lifelong, healthy habits. Through our Healthy Schools Program, we help to build healthier school environments for more than 17 million students by improving physical education, health education, child nutrition, and staff wellness policies and programs in more than 29,000 schools. Learn more and join the movement at http://www.healthiergeneration.org.

About the Clinton Foundation
The Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change. Because of our work, more than 29,000 American schools are providing kids with healthy food choices in an effort to eradicate childhood obesity; more than 85,000 farmers in Malawi, Rwanda, and Tanzania are benefiting from climate-smart agronomic training, higher yields, and increased market access; more than 33,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions are being reduced annually across the United States; over 350,000 people have been impacted through market opportunities created by social enterprises in Latin America, the Caribbean, and South Asia; through the independent Clinton Health Access Initiative, 9.9 million people in more than 70 countries have access to CHAI-negotiated prices for HIV/AIDS medications; 75 million people are benefiting from disease prevention efforts and investments in the U.S.; and members of the Clinton Global Initiative community have made more than 3,200 Commitments to Action, which have improved the lives of over 430 million people in more than 180 countries. Learn more at http://www.clintonfoundation.org, on Facebook at Facebook.com/ClintonFoundation and on Twitter @ClintonFdn.

About the American Heart Association
The American Heart Association (AHA) is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke—America’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers. The American Heart Association team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of the offices around the country.

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
For more than 40 years the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has worked to improve health and health care. The Foundation strives to build a national Culture of Health that will enable all to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come. For more information, visit http://www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter at http://www.rwjf.org/twitter or on Facebook at http://www.rwjf.org/facebook.

Study Shows Folic Acid Can Reduce Risk Of Stroke

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

Royal River Natural Foods publishes results of study that shows folic acid can reduce stroke risk in people with high blood pressure.

healthyheartbpRoyal River Natural Foods, a locally-owned independent natural health store in Freeport, Maine, reports a new study that found people with high blood pressure who took folic acid along with standard blood pressure medication were 21 percent less likely to have had a stroke after 4.5 years of follow-up compared to those who took blood pressure medication alone.

The report is part of the July 2015, issue of Natural Insights for Well Being®, which Royal River Natural Foods publishes free each month for those in the Freeport community interested in new nutrition science. Also in the July issue, pre-diabetic women who took vitamin K had lower insulin and blood sugar levels compared to those who did not take vitamin K; and female students who took ginger root capsules had as much relief from menstrual pain as with standard pain medication, among other important findings.

“New evidence continues to show that everyday nutrients help not only improve the quality of daily life, but also extend healthy living as we age,” said Becky Foster, supplement manager. “New findings this month include well respected, peer-reviewed scientific journals such as the ‘Journal of the American Medical Association,’ the ‘Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders,’ the ‘Archives of Gynecology & Obstetrics,’ among others,” Foster said.

Natural Insights for Well Being® is free, and Royal River Natural Foods invites all those who wish to gain more valuable nutrition knowledge to stop in and pick up the July issue and meet the friendly, knowledgeable staff.

About the company:

Founded in 1994, Royal River Natural Foods is a unique community, natural food store. They are committed to well-being, body and soul. Experience their outstanding customer service in a warm and welcoming environment. Royal River Natural Foods proudly features local organic food, produce, locally-raised beef, chicken, lamb, pork and seafood, healthy takeout foods, bulk foods, snacks, special dietary products, specialty wines, micro-brewed beers, gourmet food made in Maine, unique gifts, eco-friendly products and much more. Royal River Natural Foods is committed to providing local, organic and sustainably-produced foods that enrich their customers’ lives. For more information about Royal River Natural Foods, visit their website at http://www.rrnf.com.

Study Shows That Teens Lose Sleep After Change To Daylight Saving Time

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, please share your comments below…..

SleepingWomanA new study shows that high school students lose sleep on school nights following the change to daylight saving time that occurs in March. The loss of sleep during the school week was associated with a decline in vigilance and cognitive function, which raises safety concerns for teen drivers.

Results show that the average objectively measured sleep duration on the weeknights after the spring time change declined to 7 hours, 19 minutes, which reflects a mean loss of 32 minutes per night compared with the school week prior to the implementation of daylight saving time. Average cumulative sleep loss on weeknights following the time change was 2 hours, 42 minutes. During school days after the time change, students also displayed increased sleepiness and a decline in psychomotor vigilance, including longer reaction times and increased lapses of attention.

“For many years now, sleep researchers have been concerned about sleep deprivation in adolescents,” said principal investigator Dr. Ana Krieger, medical director of the Weill Cornell Center for Sleep Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and associate professor of clinical medicine, of medicine in clinical neurology, and of clinical genetic medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. “This study unveils a potential additional factor that may further restrict their sleep in the early spring.”

Study results are published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

According to the authors, this is the first study to quantify the detrimental effects of daylight saving time implementation using objective measurements of sleep duration and vigilance in students attending high school.

The study group comprised 35 high school students with a mean age of 16.5 years. Nightly sleep duration was measured at home by actigraphy during the weeks prior to and after the change to daylight saving time. Participants also completed a sleep diary to report subjective sleep measures. Measurements of daytime sleepiness and vigilance were collected using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT).

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that adolescents get a little more than nine hours of nightly sleep for optimal health and daytime alertness during the critical transition from childhood to adulthood.

“Getting adequate sleep is key for many facets of an adolescent’s development,” said Dr. Nathaniel F. Watson, president of the AASM. “This study raises significant concern about the consequences of impeding their already hectic sleep schedules with Daylight Saving Time every spring.”

To request a copy of the study, “Adverse Effects of Daylight Saving Time on Adolescents’
Sleep and Vigilance,” or to arrange an interview with the study author or an AASM spokesperson, please contact Communications Coordinator Lynn Celmer at 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, or lcelmer(at)aasmnet(dot)org.

The monthly, peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine is the official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a professional membership society that improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards (http://www.aasmnet.org). The AASM encourages patients to talk to their doctor about sleep problems or visit http://www.sleepeducation.org for a searchable directory of AASM-accredited sleep centers.

New CDC Vital Signs Report Shows Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Are Frequent And Costly

Share Button

newsAmericans spend more than 1 million days in the hospital each year from crash injuries.

More than 2.5 million people went to the emergency department (ED) – and nearly 200,000 of them were hospitalized – because of motor vehicle crash injuries in 2012, according to the latest Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lifetime medical costs for these crash injuries totaled $18 billion. This includes approximately $8 billion for those who were treated in the ED and released and $10 billion for those who were hospitalized. Lifetime work lost because of 2012 crash injuries cost an estimated $33 billion.

“In 2012, nearly 7,000 people went to the emergency department every day due to car crash injuries,” said CDC Deputy Director, Ileana Arias, PhD. “Motor vehicle crash injuries occur all too frequently and have health and economic costs for individuals, the health care system, and society. We need to do more to keep people safe and reduce crash injuries and medical costs.”

Key findings include:

* On average, each crash-related ED visit costs about $3,300 and each hospitalization costs about $57,000 over a person’s lifetime.

* More than 75 percent of costs occur during the first 18 months following the crash injury.

* Teens and young adults (15-29 years old) are at especially high risk for motor vehicle crash injuries, accounting for nearly 1 million crash injuries in 2012 (38 percent of all crash injuries that year).

* One-third of adults older than 80 years old who were injured in car crashes were hospitalized – the highest of any age group.

* There were almost 400,000 fewer ED visits and 5,700 fewer hospitalizations from motor vehicle crash injuries in 2012 compared to 2002. This equals $1.7 billion in avoided lifetime medical costs and $2.3 billion in avoided work loss costs.

For this Vital Signs report, CDC analyzed ED visits due to crash injuries in 2012 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The number and rate of all crash injury ED visits, treated and released visits, and hospitalized visits were estimated, as were the associated number of hospitalized days and lifetime medical costs.

Vital Signs is a monthly report that appears as part of the CDC journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

– This article is provided by PRWeb

The Little Gym Shares New Study That Shows Physical Activity Can Help Kids Academically

Share Button

Article courtesy of PRWeb…..

familydrivewayThe Little Gym is excited to share the findings from the Journal of Pediatrics that explores how physical activity can help children in academic settings as well.

At The Little Gym, we know that being active provides serious benefits. So it came as no surprise when a recent study confirmed that regular physical activity can improve a child’s academic success. The Journal of Pediatrics found that “Promoting physical activity that involves aerobic exercise and motor tasks during the school years may be important not only for health, but also for successful academic development.” The study monitored two groups of children; those that were engaging in regular physical activity in afterschool programs, and those who were not. The results showed that children who were physically active displayed substantial improvements in testing scores, memory, focus, and problem-solving skills.

How can you encourage your child to get and stay active? Show children that exercise is fun! Go for nightly walks, bike rides, or have a family dance party. Get children involved in age appropriate exercises and group activities like The Little Gym. The benefits of being active will help improve your child’s academic performance, social skills, health, and much more. Get up and get moving today!

To learn more about the study, click here.

Periodontal Disease Shows Link To Strokes

Share Button

By: P., Piero DDS

healthyheartIt is becoming more and more apparent that periodontal disease is linked to systemic diseases in the body. Strokes are among those links. It was reported that the thickness of the carotid arteries was reduced after treatment for mild to moderate gum disease. These studies where done in the Infectious Diseases Unit, Hospital Luigi Sacco in Milan, Italy.

The most common cause of a stroke is by a blockage in a blood vessel. It can also be caused by bleeding of a vessel. Strokes caused by blockage were the ones studied by the researchers in Italy and which showed the link with periodontal issues. These types of strokes occur when there is a thickening of the carotid and other arteries. Plaque deposits consisting of calcium and cholesterol break off and block the blood vessels and arteries. When this occurs it prevents blood from reaching the brain. It should be noted that these plaque deposits should not be confused with periodontal plaque.

The perpetrator, however, is bacteria that are found in periodontal disease. The protein in the bacteria is akin to that found in periodontal disease. Our body sets up a defense mechanism to attack periodontal disease by first producing a chemical to attack the disease then to attack the proteins in the blood vessels. The deposits in the arteries are then built up. A stroke is then a result of the fatty substances breaking off the lining of the blood vessels, traveling to the brain, and blocking the blood.

About 800,000 people suffer from strokes each year in the US. These result in over 140,000 deaths and are the third leading cause of death. Both men and women can be affected and a stroke can occur at any age.

toothThe chronic infection of the soft tissue around teeth is called periodontal disease. Pockets are formed around the tooth as the gum tissue is destroyed. Loose teeth, deep pockets, bad breath that won’t go away, painful or bleeding gums and red or swollen gums are all symptoms of this disease. Unfortunately, in the early stages of periodontitis, no symptoms appear. It is necessary that you see a dentist every six months to insure the disease is caught early. Periodontitis is caused by dental plaque build-up which is a result of not keeping teeth, gums and between teeth clean.

Age, gender, and family history are risk factors for stroke that one cannot control. However, there are risk factors that can be controlled, such as periodontal disease. Individuals CAN manage the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease and reduce their risk of strokes. Although oral surgical procedures may be necessary for severe periodontal cases, most prevention and treatment requires good oral hygiene.

The National Center for Biotechnology Information who published the study showing the link between strokes and periodontal disease, reported that the thickening of the carotid arteries “are positively influenced by periodontal treatment.” (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19074511?dopt=Abstract)

This information reinforces the belief that many in the dental profession have known for years, that there is a significant link between oral health and overall health.

– Dr. Piero, a Holland, MI dentist for over thirty years, is the inventor of Dental Air Force®. Articles published are on periodontal health related to heart disease, respiratory health, diabetes, strokes, and other systemic diseases. He is the Executive Editor for Journal of Experimental Dental Science, a contributing author to Hospital Infection Control: Clinical Guidelines and soon-to-be published book, Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

New California Field Poll Shows Support For ‘Soda Tax’

Share Button

sodabottleFrom Your Health Journal…..”We have discussed here many times about the brewing controversy about taxing ‘sugary’ soft drinks. From NYC to LA to Nevada – from Canada to the UK, many governments are looking to cut down on specific liquid consumptions. There is talk in some areas to create a fat tax, limit size of drinks sold, and to ban certain drinks. What would be consumer reaction? Some fear the government has no place getting involved in what they eat, while others feel the government does have right, since many of these young adults and children are going to grow up overweight and obese, causing weight related illness – therefore, costing the government extra money on healthcare. But now, an article by Chris Palmer and Ryder Diaz of The San Jose Mercury and Times-Standard touches upon this topic in California. In a state poll, it appears the soda tax has some support. Only 40 percent of voters support a soda tax when first asked, but support increases dramatically to 68 percent if the proceeds are earmarked for improved school nutrition and physical activity programs. This poll may place soda tax on the next election ballot. The poll also showed that 75 percent of registered California voters, including 85 percent of Latinos, see a link between drinking sugary sodas and a person’s chance of becoming overweight or obese. But fewer voters believe energy drinks or sports drinks carry the same health risks. Please visit the Times-Standard web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It was well written and informative.”

From the article…..

A new statewide poll has given hope to supporters of “soda tax” measures.

According to a new Field Poll, only 40 percent of voters support a soda tax when first asked, but support increases dramatically to 68 percent if the proceeds are earmarked for improved school nutrition and physical activity programs.

The poll could help propel efforts in California and other states to put a soda tax on statewide ballots.

The survey found support for a tax is especially strong among Latinos, Asian-Americans and African-Americans. The poll also showed that 75 percent of registered California voters, including 85 percent of Latinos, see a link between drinking sugary sodas and a person’s chance of becoming overweight or obese. But fewer voters believe energy drinks or sports drinks carry the same health risks.

”I think this poll shows that a campaign either statewide or locally in cities has an excellent chance,” said Wendel Brunner, Contra Costa County’s director of public health.

Officials of the beverage industry downplayed the poll results.

”I don’t think the voters are ready for a tax as presented in the poll because voters (eventually) learn that most of the added sugar in the American diet is from other sources,” said Chuck Finnie, a spokesman for the American Beverage Association. “They come to understand that singling out a particular product for special treatment is not good policy.

”Californians are very health conscious,” he added. “But the poll is almost designed to overstate.”

Field surveyed 1,184 registered California voters by telephone Oct. 17-24. The margin of error for the poll, which was conducted in six languages, was plus or minus 3 percentage points. It was the third in a series of annual statewide surveys on childhood obesity conducted on behalf of the California Endowment, a health foundation.

Local measure to tax soda recently failed in two California cities.

To read the complete article…..Click here