Zero To Hero: How Your Mindset Can Be Your Key To Healthy Living And Good Health – Part 2

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By Kamala Appel

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

girlhulaAfter that fiasco, I made a promise to myself never ever to experience that level of pain again- never ever. (Even though several of the various other ladies were 6-12 inches taller and had actually played 2 to 4 years longer). I educated myself about kids health, how to be healthy, how to eat healthy, and constant with my exercise program: I ran 3-5 miles each and every day, rain or shine, and paced at a 7 min rate per mile.

Even with all this hard work, I was cut from the team when I tried out that fall. But I still played club during the play off-season but only as a bench warmer, yet I stuck with it.

But after that went on to letter in two sports at the Division I level in university. And I also coached a college level team shortly after college.

Then 8 years after that initial camp, I ran in to one of my first volleyball coaches, who was there at the first horrific training camp I went to, and I informed her I was coaching. And her reaction reminded me of my wellness and health quest and exactly how the choice to be a great pal altered my life.

If you had actually asked me when I was 15, if I would play competitive sporting activities, I would certainly have assumed you were higher like my stoner papa and my good friends’ moms and dads. If you had asked me when I was 15, if I would commit myself to being healthy and genuinely delight in playing sporting activities and exercising, U.C. Berkeley, I would never have imagined how my life would unfold.

However, if you ask me now, I would certainly inform you, that I could possibly not picture my life without fitness and sports. I was not a natural athlete by any means. I did not acquire any type of reassurance or awareness from my buddies and household.

boygirlplayNow I am a weekend warrior, as we are called, and do triathlons and aquaterras (splash and touches). If you have actually never ever attempted a mix endurance race, I urge you to give one a shot. Possibly you could convince a pal into going with you.

I have actually never ever been sorry for being dedicated and making the sacrifices I have made over the years to be healthy since they are second to the perks. I have actually found out that a dedication to diet plan, exercise, and a healthy mindset will certainly make you really feel happy and others respect you.

Moral of the story: Even if you start off as the worst one there, even if you suck royally, and if you assume you are a complete loser- anything is possible.

– Sports, exercise and fitness have been a huge part of my life and led me to be more health-conscious than I probably would have been otherwise. Sports have even helped me conquer an eating disorder. However, even though I have played competitive sports and, as a result been an advocate for health and fitness for more than half my life; I am far from a natural. In fact, I am a bit of a zero to hero story. I didn’t even start playing sports until a friend dragged me to a volleyball training camp when I was in high school because she did not want to go alone. Now I am hooked on healthy living and a supporter of eating healthy (I enjoy reading First for Women because they have tips about emotional and physical wellness). I stick to an anti-inflammation diet about 90% of the time- the other 10%, well I’m human. (Check out the free IF calculator at http://nutritiondata.self.com/help/inflammation, I am not affiliated). Find out how you can live a healthy lifestyle with ease by visiting: ReasonsForBeing.com/reasonswp/

Zero To Hero: How Your Mindset Can Be Your Key To Healthy Living And Good Health – Part 1

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By Kamala Appel

exerciseI stated briefly that I went from absolutely zero to hero when it concerned sporting activities. OK, so most likely not hero like an Olympian, however a minimum of all my effort settled and I didn’t draw. Right here is my scrub back tale:

Although I have actually played competitive sporting activities and, consequently been a follower of Health and Fitness for majority my life; I am much from an all-natural. If I were a guy, I would certainly be cast in the part of the ninety pound coward as I was constantly smaller sized compared to my schoolmates. Being small for girls does not have the same baggage that it does for boys, however it is a disadvantage for either gender when it involves competitive sporting activities.

When I went to a training camp at U.C. Berkeley, I had a nervous bladder from stress and anxiety stemming from the reality that I would certainly have to play a sporting activity that I had no idea how to play. I fell down a lot, and also though volleyball involves hitting the flooring a great deal, not as much as I did and not in the awkward way that I did. I also could not get my hand around the ball for warm ups.

Every person was looking at me and I was not imagining it. Once during a break when I was in the washroom, I heard several of the big-hair valley b-s ragging on me.

“I can’t believe she stays,” one of them said loudly.

“I know what you mean,” one more added. “She is so sorry, I can’t even bare to look at her”.
“Yeah,” yet another chimed in, “it was kind of funny at first, but now it’s just sad.”

As if making eye contact with me would transform them to rock. Evidently, I was the Medusa of volleyball and they was afraid that my clumsiness was contagious.

healthillustratedI was dejected mentally and physically. I had actually made a promise to a buddy, so I sucked it up and I completed the camp (likewise I paid for it myself and I do not like to waste money).

I was in so much discomfort after the 3 day experience that I could barely move. My buddy and I essentially dragged each other up to Strawberry Canyon.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Sports, exercise and fitness have been a huge part of my life and led me to be more health-conscious than I probably would have been otherwise. Sports have even helped me conquer an eating disorder. However, even though I have played competitive sports and, as a result been an advocate for health and fitness for more than half my life; I am far from a natural. In fact, I am a bit of a zero to hero story. I didn’t even start playing sports until a friend dragged me to a volleyball training camp when I was in high school because she did not want to go alone. Now I am hooked on healthy living and a supporter of eating healthy (I enjoy reading First for Women because they have tips about emotional and physical wellness). I stick to an anti-inflammation diet about 90% of the time- the other 10%, well I’m human. (Check out the free IF calculator at http://nutritiondata.self.com/help/inflammation, I am not affiliated). Find out how you can live a healthy lifestyle with ease by visiting: ReasonsForBeing.com/reasonswp/

Top 10 Myths About Cardio Disease

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healthyheartFrom Your Health Journal…..Our friends at the American Heart Association came out with their Top 10 Myths About Cardio Disease. It is posted all over the internet today, but I wanted to include some of it here in case you did not see it yet. Very sound advice and information for all of us. The article teaches us you are never too young to have heart disease, there are no warning signs to heart disease, you don’t need to have chest pains to have a heart attack, diabetes does effect your heart, and even though heart disease runs in your family you can prevent it to some extent. Although people with a family history of heart disease are at higher risk, you can take steps to dramatically reduce your risk. Create an action plan to keep your heart healthy by tackling these to-dos: get active; control cholesterol; eat better; manage blood pressure; maintain a healthy weight; control blood sugar; and stop smoking.? Please read this carefully as it is an important message to understand.”

From the article…..

How much do you really know about your heart’s health? It’s easy to be fooled by misconceptions. After all, heart disease only happens to your elderly neighbor or to your fried food-loving uncle, right? Or do you know the real truth – that heart disease can affect people of any age, even those who eat right?

Relying on false assumptions can be dangerous to your heart. Cardiovascular disease kills more Americans each year than any other disease. But you can boost your heart smarts by separating fact from fiction. Let’s set the record straight on some common myths.

1. “I’m too young to worry about heart disease.”

How you live now affects your risk for cardiovascular diseases later in life. As early as childhood and adolescence, plaque can start accumulating in the arteries and later lead to clogged arteries. One in three Americans has cardiovascular disease, but not all of them are senior citizens. Even young and middle-aged people can develop heart problems – especially now that obesity, type 2 diabetes and other risk factors are becoming more common at a younger age.

2. “I’d know if I had high blood pressure because there would be warning signs.”

High blood pressure is called the “silent killer” because you don’t usually know you have it. You may never experience symptoms, so don’t wait for your body to alert you that there’s a problem. The way to know if you have high blood pressure is to check your numbers with a simple blood pressure test. Early treatment of high blood pressure is critical because, if left untreated, it can cause heart attack, stroke, kidney damage and other serious health problems. Learn how high blood pressure is diagnosed.?

3. “I’ll know when I’m having a heart attack because I’ll have chest pain.”

Not necessarily. Although it’s common to have chest pain or discomfort, a heart attack may cause subtle symptoms. These include shortness of breath, nausea, feeling lightheaded, and pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the jaw, neck or back. Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, call 9-1-1 immediately. Learn you risk of heart attack today!?

4. “Diabetes won’t threaten my heart as long as I take my medication.”

Treating diabetes can help reduce your risk for or delay the development of cardiovascular diseases. But even when blood sugar levels are under control, you’re still at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. That’s because the risk factors that contribute to diabetes onset also make you more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. These overlapping risk factors include high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity and smoking.?

To read the full article…..Click here