4 Ways To Maintain Your Brain

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

brainAerobic exercise, the Mediterranean diet, social connectedness, and undertaking challenges reduce the risk of dementia.

Many people want to build up some “insurance” against dementia and other memory problems. But there’s no need to invest in pricey brain-training programs. Instead, do-it-yourself lifestyle changes have been shown to help ward off memory loss and dementia, reports the February 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch. The following strategies lead the list:

Exercise. “The best evidence so far is for aerobic exercise and physical fitness,” says Dr. Bradford Dickerson, associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School. Scores of studies and clinical trials have linked regular aerobic exercise to a reduced risk of dementia. A few brain imaging studies have even shown that aerobic exercise increases brain mass and improves reasoning ability. The best exercise “dose” is 30 minutes or more per day, five times a week.

Eat well. The Mediterranean diet — high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains; moderate in olive oil, unsaturated fats, lean protein (poultry, fish, beans, and nuts), cheese, yogurt, and wine; and low in red meat — has been a mainstay of cardiac prevention for almost 20 years. It has also been linked to a reduced risk of dementia. The closer people follow this type of heart-healthy diet, the lower the risk.

Stay connected. Being part of a social network also appears to reduce the risk of dementia. The variety in a person’s social network and the satisfaction he or she gets from social contacts is more important than the size of the network.

Keep mentally active. The “use it or lose it” principle appears to apply to brain health. Mental stimulation, like playing a musical instrument, learning another language, volunteering, or engaging in hobbies, offers greater benefits than repetitive exercises like crossword puzzles. Although “brain-training” programs are a multi-million-dollar industry, there is no conclusive evidence that any of them improves memory or reasoning ability. “We don’t know whether playing brain games is helpful,” Dr. Dickerson says. “Getting together with family and friends to play cards may be as good.”

Read the full-length article: “The 4 best ways to maintain your brain”

Also in the February 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

* Finding the right medications for asthma and COPD

* Simple solutions for dizziness

* Measures to prevent “dowager’s hump”

* Water exercise for strength, balance, and cardiovascular fitness

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Benefits Of Toys And Brain Development In Toddlers

Share Button

By Veselina Dzhingarova

brainBrain development in toddlers is a reflection of how they understand the world around them. A great portion of this understanding is inherently developed during the first year of life where they learn to trust their senses. By the time they reach 18 months, they will already be supplementing their sensory experiences with other activities that are brought about by their interactions with the toys that we give them as well as their social interactions with other people. For the most part, toys have a great influence in their cognitive development. Here are some of the benefits of toys on the brain and cognitive development of toddlers.

1. Stimulates Curiosity

Toddlers are deemed natural explorers. Because of their improved motor skills and renewed confidence, they tend to explore a lot of things which would help them make sense of the world around them. Find toys that stimulate their sense of exploration and allow them to discover new things around them. By the time they reach 3 years old, they will already be bombarding you with a lot of “why” questions. It may be annoying sometimes because there is no end to their questions. But this is exactly how toddlers learn. Toys help them become naturally curious about certain things in their surroundings.

2. Helps Understand Cause-Effect Relationships

By age 18 months old, toddlers will already be able to understand simple causal relationships. They will already have an idea that a particular action will lead to a certain reaction. This can provide the basis for their ability to predict outcomes as well as identify potential consequences of any given action. Toys that help facilitate this understanding are thus, beneficial for brain development in toddlers. This can help them in the development of their creativity and imagination as they now have an idea of what will happen if they create or do something.

3. Develops Ability to Plan

Toddlers by age 2 years will already begin choosing and planning for their own playtime activities. This is because of the continuing maturity of their executive control systems, meaning, they are now able to take full control of their body movements particularly control of their limbs. This allows them to think of how best to use those movements to accomplish a certain task. Make-believe and pretend play toys can help toddlers make rough plans on how they need to carry out the game.

cutekids4. Learns Object Permanence

Young kids have this idea that an object that cannot be seen is an object that is not existent. That is why they love very much playing with peek-a-boo simply because of the magic of the disappearing face. However, by the time they reach 2 years of age, toddlers already begin to understand object permanence. This simply means that toddlers are getting more efficient at playing hide and seek. This also means that they can now play with toys that allow them to search for clues and other objects. Puzzles and sorters will fit this bill perfectly.

5. Improves Concentration and Focus

While the attention span of a toddler is a measly 6 minutes, giving the right kind of toy can drastically improve this by keeping him interested and focused on the toy itself. This is where high quality toys can be differentiated from mediocre ones as the former can sustain a toddler’s interest for prolonged periods of time. This can help improve their focus and concentration which can also help improve their overall cognitive development.

There are other benefits of toys on toddlers’ brain development. Suffice it to say that toys are the instruments upon which a child’s growth and development are formed and enhanced.

The Modern, Sluggish Brain

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

brainThe recent revelation that that 84 out of 85 undergraduates failed to reproduce the iconic Apple logo, despite the majority being Mac users themselves, highlights the unique ways in which our brains process information, according to Dr. Sandeep Grewal, author of the book “Dementia Express.”

In the study conducted at UCLA, participants were asked to recreate the logo on paper by memory, while others were asked to simply pick it out of a logo line-up consisting of similar, slightly-altered versions. Despite how confident many of the volunteers felt about their own familiarity with the brand before the test, fewer than half were able to successfully identify the correct one.

“People had trouble picking out the correct logo even when it was right in front of them,” said senior author of the study, Dr. Alan Castel, associate professor of psychology at UCLA. This is the same Dr. Castel who in 2012 demonstrated how unfamiliar most people are with fire extinguisher locations where they work, despite, in many cases, passing them every day.

The results were published in March in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, and were attributed to the ways in which the mind retains data. Some data is more roughly retained, the study explains, and perhaps our brains learn to discern between which memories are more crucial, and which are more disposable.

“It’s also a reflection of how muddled the modern mind has become,” Dr. Grewal adds. “Our brains are so bombarded by data, much more than with earlier generations. We lose our concentration much easier, and sometimes we think we’re paying far better attention than we actually are.”

Grewal is an internal medicine specialist practicing in both Carolinas, and author of the book “Dementia Express” which deals specifically with keeping our minds more sharpened as we age.

“Like any other muscle, the brain needs an occasional workout – if not a regular routine,” he explains. “To stave off dementia, to keep yourself sharp and keep motor function in top working order, that’s why we exercise our minds.”

Grewal’s book was designed to be a mental workout of its own. The text utilizes backwards logic and frequently contradicts itself as an exercise in decoding its true meaning. Readers are encouraged to forget what they’ve learned, and to not worry about trouble signs, all while suggesting the exact opposite.

“It’s a fun way to your brain on its toes” the doctor adds. “It’s a real page turner, as you literally never know what’s on the next page.”

Dr. Grewal’s book, “Dementia Express,” is available on amazon.

Brain Aging…Can You Do Anything About It? – Part 2

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Wald

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

omega35. Eat fish with high levels of omega 3 fatty acids such as salmon, tuna, swordfish and mackerel; these important fats are proven to reduce brain atrophy (shrinkage), premature death of brain neurons and oxidative (degenerative) changes in the brain. The best type of salmon is Alaskan and not Atlantic salmon.

Dr. Wald strongly suggests that everyone who eats salmon more than once per month have their blood and urine mercury levels checked to detect and avoid mercury toxicity; these recommendations are very close to governmental suggestions regarding this issue. Bottom line, a combination of mercury vapor testing, serum metals (measuring total metals), red blood cells metals and minerals (also measuring total metals and minerals) and urinary 24-hour provocation testing (using a chelator of substance that helps bring metals into the urine so that they can be measured) and urinary free metals (the only test included here that separates out the harmful metals known as “free or unbound metals” from the bound or “non-free metals).

Take a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids including EPA and DHA oils: these oils, when supplemented according to metabolic rate (see Bioimpadance Testing under our Services section) will help to get the dose right. The dose of omega 3 oils, or any other nutrients for that matter, will also depend upon one’s needs for the given nutrient(s) changing one’s overall requirements. For example, if you have high cholesterol you require omega 3 oils; if you have inflammation or memory issues your dose requirement is much higher; if you are on a blood thinner like aspirin, coumadin or warforin your dose must be much lower or high depending upon your blood INR levels (a clotting test), platelet count and function and perhaps other tests (like bioimpedance mentioned above).

6. Taking a supplement called phosphotidylcholine and phosphatidylserine helps to maintain the integrity of neurons as an essential compound of nerve tissue. If you take this, other nutritional compounds, in terms of dosages, must change – please read our Nutritional Synergism Q & A under our Q & A section.

7. Take a multivitamin/mineral supplement – providing the B-vitamins needed for neurotransmitters to work properly (particularly B6). Not all multivitamins are alike. We have produced our own that meet our ridged quality assurance (scientific) requirements for composition, balance and type of ingredients. Not all supplements like multivitamins are the same. We use a few different formulations to meet the needs of our patients based on age, medication use, nutritional supplement use, exercise levels, sleep quality, blood results, results of other tests, health history and more.

exercisebrain8. Consider bio-identical hormones: the brain is known to age faster in some individuals when levels of estrogens, growth hormone testosterone, pregnenolone, progesterone and DHEA decline. Hormones can be balanced with dietary, herbal, nutritional supplement and natural hormones themselves. Even individuals with some very serious forms of brain aging including MS, ALS, Alzeheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, dementia from cardiovascular disease (i.e., TIA’s or mini-strokes) respond favorably to hormonal replacement and nutrition done right.

9. Take nutrition specific for supporting one’s thyroid; low thyroid function is associated with accelerated brain aging. Adrenal disease and atrophy (shrinking) have been associated with brain aging. Mal-absorption syndromes caused from gluten; indicant and other issues must be identified and corrected. Sometimes you’ve just got to fix other tissues that are not functioning properly and have contributed or caused brain aging.

10. MOST IMPORTANT – Our blood detective technology helps me figure out the most appropriate and individualized nutritional plan for overall quality of life. See our, Blood Nutritional Consultation on our home page under the Consultations section (www.intmedny.com).

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Brain Aging…Can You Do Anything About It? – Part 1

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Wald

brainBrain aging is a natural process, but for many, the aging brain causing levels of mental dysfunction that often reduce the quality and length of life. Loss of short and long-term memory, increased inability to “find the right words” or connect something you are looking at and recalling its name, mental fogginess, outright dementia and Alzheimer’s disease and an overall sense of fatigue are just some of the ways in which an aging brain could affect you.

Below are some of my thoughts regarding nutritional and natural ways to offset the degenerative effects of aging upon the human brain that Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco have researched and perfected for use with our large patient population. These are general considerations to help prevent certain age related changes and to offset those that may be inevitable. It is essential to keep in mind that careful medical and nutritional history, dietary review, personalized laboratory (i.e., blood analysis and other testing), brain imaging (i.e., MRI, CT, EEG, EEG, etc.) can all potentially improve overall quality of life.

1. Consuming 4-6 pieces of fruits and vegetables per day will give you antioxidants that help to reduce the oxidative stress of brain aging, memory loss, etc. Juice everyday! See our Juicing Recipe in the Articles section of our website; supplement your juicing with dehydrated fruits and vegetables to increase nutritional and enzyme content thousands of times more! See our Blood Detective products including our product, Brain Food.

2. Eating healthy fats such as mono- and polyunsaturated fats especially from cold pressed (virgin, imported) olive oil and avocados help ensure that the cellular membranes of brain cells maintain a healthy fluidity. Hardness of brain cell membranes or loss of membrane fluidity is often associated with memory loss, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, MS, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory diseases and atrophy (shrinking of the brain). Consuming supplements of these types of oils and others including mercury free fish oils (i.e., salmon, sardines, mackerel, krill, etc.) can increase the brain content of these healthy oils much faster than eating foods alone. Special tests are available to help ensure that the proper dosage of these oils (otherwise known as the, “therapeutic dose) is reached. Otherwise, you may be wasting your time. These oils, if consumed in therapeutic amounts, require other nutritional synergists (aka, partners) such as vitamin E and selenium (also in certain amounts) that can be determined through careful expert examinations such as our Blood Detective interpretations and our clinical experience.

3. Increasing one’s intake of healthy protein sources such as raw nuts, seeds, free-range animal proteins; proteins are required to produce neurotransmitters in the brain – chemicals that allow for proper brain function. Vegetarian proteins are probably best, but then again, proper testing and other considerations must be considered when choosing the right proteins for someone with a goal of improving and slowing down brain aging. Proper levels of stomach acid and pancreatic enzymes are only two essential considerations and both clinical experience by our doctors and testing help to clarify for each individual.

cookies4. Reduce one’s intake of refined and processed carbohydrates and sugars such as desserts, refined pasta and table sugar; these types of sugars (carbohydrates) cause wild fluctuations in brain and blood glucose levels that can increase brain and nervous system aging. This is important for anyone we believe for any health purpose whatsoever, but even this must be done correctly. We see many patients who have imbalanced diets in their efforts to be healthy. We can help figure this all out! What is important is to understand that certain sugars (not including fruits) can damage the nervous system and many other structures causing and worsening nervous system (i.e., brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve) function causing many serious health problems. The nervous system controls many essential functions so the damage can extend virtually anywhere in the body.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Brain Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease – Preventing Loss Of Self – Part 2

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Wald

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

brainthinkingCarnitine is a vitamin-like substance that is responsible for the transport of fatty acids into and out of the mitochondria. Evidence suggests that carnitine may protect neurologic tissue due to its antioxidant and energy producing activity, and its role in neurotransmitter function.
While there are many forms of carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) appears to have better activity in the central nervous system, including brain tissue. ALC administration in patients with primary degenerative dementia showed therapeutic efficacy in clinical, behavioral, and neuropsychological evaluations. A series of controlled studies suggests that ALC may slow the natural course of Alzheimer’s disease. In particular, persons with dementia given 1.5 to 3 grams ALC daily for 3 or 6 months have shown improvement in numerous clinical measures of cognitive function. In addition, “safety and tolerability of ALC [are] remarkably good,” further demonstrating the potential use of ALC in a number of progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Go to: www.blooddetective.com for L-Carnitine.

B vitamins, homocysteine, and neurological function in the elderly

Folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 are critical to many bodily processes, including the health of the nervous system, blood, and cells. In addition, these B-group vitamins have been shown to protect against depression, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, “the status of these vitamins is frequently inadequate in the elderly and recent studies have shown associations between loss of cognitive function or Alzheimer’s disease and inadequate B vitamin status.”

Research has shown that an inadequate B vitamin status may result in neurocognitive dysfunction through elevated homocysteine concentrations in the blood, or hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine is an amino acid that is produced in the human body. Prevalent in the elderly population, hyperhomocysteinemia is largely attributed to insufficient levels of folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12.

seniors2The association between cognitive dysfunction and hyperhomocysteinemia has been demonstrated in numerous studies. For instance, Dr. Selhub and colleagues reported “patients with Alzheimer’s disease had higher total plasma homocysteine concentrations than did age-matched healthy controls,” while “elderly patients with depression who had lower cognitive screening test scores had significantly higher homocysteine concentrations than did patients with normal cognitive screening tests.” Because folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 are often deficient among many elderly patients, the importance of these vitamins in the prevention of hyperhomocysteinemia and neurocognitive dysfunction cannot be overlooked. Be sure and use the active forms of folic acid (L-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid), B12 (methylcobalamine and pyridoxyl-5-phosphate.

Prevention is the key! Be proactive as most regular physicians have no nutritional training and are not up on the latest scientific nutritional literature and advances.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Brain Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease – Preventing Loss Of Self – Part 1

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Wald

seniormanIf you are part of the baby boomer generation, then you face a unique problem; namely, the very real potential exists that you will loose your memory slowly over the later part of your life. Here are a few facts that you need to know:

• As you age your risk of memory loss, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease rises

• Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of the aging process. The incidence of the disease doubles every five years beyond the age of 65.

• As the number of people over age 65 doubles between 2010 and 2056 to approximately 88.5 million (or to about 20% of the population), those over the age of 85 will increase three-fold, and the incidence of memory issues, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease increases as well.

• A half of a million Americans younger than the age of 65 suffer from some form of dementia (memory loss) including Alzheimer’s disease.

Nutritional science offers some important options for the treatment and prevention of all stages of memory loss. If you think that you are suffering from memory loss first visit your doctor. Then seek out a trained clinical nutritionist to perform a detailed nutritional-health consultation and appropriate nutritional lab work. Here are a few things you might consider in the meantime:

Fatty acid levels analyzed in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid found in salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines, and shellfish and is essential for proper brain functioning. A lack of sufficient DHA may be associated with impaired visual functioning, depression, as well as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

brainAccording to Dr. Julie Conquer and colleagues in Lipids, low levels of omega-3 fatty acids, including DHA, may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment and/or dementia. A recent study sought to determine the concentration of DHA in a group of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias compared to a group of elderly control subjects with normal cognitive functioning. For each participant, blood was collected and tested for DHA concentration. Results demonstrated that the concentration of DHA was 48% less in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and 21% less in patients with other forms of dementia, compared to the elderly control subjects with normal cognitive function.

Dr. Conquer and colleagues stated, “A decreased level of plasma DHA was not limited to the [Alzheimer’s disease] patients but appears to be common in cognitive impairment with aging.” More studies are needed to investigate whether DHA supplementation can reduce the occurrence or symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. (Lipids 2000; 35(12): 1305-12.).

I have observed DHA deficiency in my clinical practice over the last 22 years. It’s my judgment that it is safe and worth adding as a nutritional supplement to a balanced diet. See: www.blooddetective.com for Krill Oil and Vegetarian Omega 3 Fatty Acid.

Acetyl-L-carnitine may prevent Alzheimer’s disease

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Probiotics Lend A Hand To Brain Functioning – Part 3

Share Button

By Christie Korth

Part 3 of 3

Continued from part 2 of this article…..

soup5) Miso Soup: Miso, a staple of Japanese cooking and medicine is commonly used in macrobiotic cooking as a digestive regulator. Made from fermented rye, beans, rice or barley, adding a tablespoon of miso to some hot water makes an excellent, quick, probiotic-rich soup, full of lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria. Beyond its important live cultures, miso is extremely nutrient-dense and believed to help neutralize the effects of environmental pollution, alkalinize the body and stop the effects of carcinogens in the system. Yaaay for Miso!

Our favorite pick: Kid Friendly Chicken Noodle Miso Soup by Food Network

Ingredients:

1/4 cup miso
1/4 cup warm water
6 cups water
1 large red chile, sliced
1 tablespoon finely grated ginger
3 green onions, thinly sliced
2 chicken breasts, trimmed and thinly sliced
100 g snow peas, halved
250 g rice noodles
3 green onions, thinly sliced for garnish

Directions:

1. Place the miso paste and warm water in a small bowl and stir to combine.

2. Place the water, chilli, ginger and green onions in a large saucepan over high heat and bring to the boil.

3. Add the chicken, snow peas and noodles and cook for 3-4 minutes until the chicken and noodles are cooked through.

4. Stir the miso mixture into the noodle mixture.

5. To serve, spoon into bowls and top with extra green onions.

Book of the Month Review:

Sophie – Safe Cooking: A Collection of Family Friendly Recipes that are Free of Milk, Eggs, Wheat, Soy, Peanuts, Tree Nuts, Fish and Shellfish by Emily Hendrix

Description: Sophie-Safe Cooking houses over 100 recipes very neatly laid out, one per page. Most of the recipes contain less than ten ingredients (always a top feature for me) and for the most part the directions are just a few straightforward sentences. Emily adds in helpful, but brief, notes with several of the recipes. Most of the recipes are Sophie-Safe versions of familiar family favorites, such as Granny’s Meatloaf, Shepherd’s Pie, and Chocolate Cupcakes (frosted of course!). While a few unique concepts caught my eye, like the Whipped Pinto Beans, Zucchini Brownies, and Taco Vinaigrette. Enjoy!

References

1. Kirsten Tillisch, Jennifer Labus, Lisa Kilpatrick, Zhiguo Jiang, Jean Stains, Bahar Ebrat, Denis Guyonnet, Sophie Legrain-Raspaud, Beatrice Trotin, Bruce Naliboff, Emeran A. Mayer. Consumption of Fermented Milk Product with Probiotic Modulates Brain Activity. Gastroenterology, 2013; DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Probiotics Lend A Hand To Brain Functioning – Part 2

Share Button

By Christie Korth

Part 2 of 3

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

tea2) Kombucha: A type of fermented tea, Kombucha contains a high amount of healthy gut bacteria. This probiotic- rich beverage has been used for centuries and has been shown to help increase your energy, enhance your well being and maybe even help you lose weight. However, kombucha tea may not be the best fit for everyone. For instance, if you have suffer with candida, Kombucha may not be appropriate while treating candida infection.

Our favorite pick: GT Synergy

3) Kimchi: Popular In Asia, this pickled Saurkraut is an extremely spicy and sour fermented cabbage, typically served alongside meals in Korea. Besides beneficial bacteria, Kimchi is also a great source of beta-carotene, calcium, iron and vitamins A, C, B1 and B2. Kimchi is one of the best probiotic foods you can add to your diet, assuming you can handle the spice, of course. You can make Kimchi without all of the heat, as I have gone ahead and done here.

Our favorite pick: Kid/Family-Friendly Kimchi Recipe by Mama in the Kitchen

• Chop into bite size pieces or slice: 1 big or 2 small Napa Cabbages, cored

• Place in a non-metallic container. Your best bet would be to use big glass mason jars. You can also try using the lining of a slow cooker.

• Massage cabbage with ¼ sea salt

• Cover with water, place a plate with a weight on top (I used 2 mason jars full of water) or bamboo sticks fixed to the top of a jar to make sure all the cabbage is submerged in water. Leave overnight. The next day, drain the water and rinse the cabbage.

Now, mix the cabbage with:

Ingredients:

1 cup of water
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tsp. sea salt
1 green apple, grated
2 green onions, sliced
3 large carrots, grated
½ cup local honey
1/3 cup raisins

• Mix together well. Make sure there are no air pockets by pushing the vegetables down. Again, place a plate with a weight on top or bamboo sticks fixed to the top of a jar to make sure all the cabbage is submerged in liquid. Cover with a towel and leave for 3 – 4 days. When done, place in mason jars and refrigerate.

• Serve kimchi with vegetables or noodles. Be creative, it can also be used on a sandwich or wrap or as a salad dressing!.

4) Saurkraut: Grab an organic beef hot dog and a gluten free bun and it’s a picnic in the park. If you want it to pack a nutritional punch, go for the addition of raw sauerkraut. Made from fermented cabbage (and sometimes other vegetables), sauerkraut is not only extremely rich in healthy live cultures, but might also help with reducing allergy symptoms. Sauerkraut is also rich in vitamins B, A, E and C.

Our Favorite Pick: Rejuvenate Foods Raw Sauerkraut. Not just sauerkraut, Rejuvenate offers all types of cluttered vegetebles and even tahihi, live salsas, ketchup and pickles! Excellent choice for kids, particularly those who are picky!

Stay tuned for part 3 of this article shortly…..

References

1. Kirsten Tillisch, Jennifer Labus, Lisa Kilpatrick, Zhiguo Jiang, Jean Stains, Bahar Ebrat, Denis Guyonnet, Sophie Legrain-Raspaud, Beatrice Trotin, Bruce Naliboff, Emeran A. Mayer. Consumption of Fermented Milk Product with Probiotic Modulates Brain Activity. Gastroenterology, 2013; DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Probiotics Lend A Hand To Brain Functioning – Part 1

Share Button

By Christie Korth

Part 1 of 3

brainMany people may hear the word bacteria and find it synonymous with creepy critters or contributory to a case of the sniffles. And yes, of course that is partially true. At the same time, the nutrition world is ever buzzing about one of the most interesting concepts in time. The notion that bacteria is bad is not always correct, in fact bacteria can be extraordinarily beneficial for the brain, immune system, intestines, cancer treatment and prevention and has even been proven to help stroke victims.

Most recently, probiotics are yet again in the spotlight, this time being hailed as a paramount promoter of cognition and emotional well being. Everyone can better from thinking clearer and a more positive emotional response, right?

UCLA researchers now have the first evidence that bacteria ingested in food can affect brain function in humans. In an early proof-of-concept study of healthy women, they found that women who regularly consumed beneficial bacteria known as probiotics through yogurt showed altered brain function, both while in a resting state and in response to an emotion-recognition task.

The Gut / Brain Connection

The knowledge that signals are sent from the intestine to the brain and that they can be modulated by a dietary change is likely to lead to an expansion of research aimed at finding new strategies to prevent or treat digestive, mental and neurological disorders, said Dr. Emeran Mayer, a professor of medicine, physiology and psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the study’s senior author. (University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences (2013, May 28). Changing gut bacteria through diet affects brain function.)

So the bottom line is, consuming good bacteria is really something to consider adding to your daily diet as well as your family. So= besides yougurt and supplements, where can you find those brain boosting bacteria? Check out our list below.

Foods Highest in Probiotics:

1) Dark Chocolate: Long touted for its richness in minerals like magnesium and zinc and its high level of antioxidants, dark chocolate can also pack a wallop in probiotics. You have to know where to look, but there are some high quality chocolates that contain probiotics.

Our favorite pick? – Go to attunefoods.com and check out their chocolate bars which are chock full of beneficial bacteria, like Bifidobacterium lactis HN019, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Lactobacillus casei LC-11

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

References

1. Kirsten Tillisch, Jennifer Labus, Lisa Kilpatrick, Zhiguo Jiang, Jean Stains, Bahar Ebrat, Denis Guyonnet, Sophie Legrain-Raspaud, Beatrice Trotin, Bruce Naliboff, Emeran A. Mayer. Consumption of Fermented Milk Product with Probiotic Modulates Brain Activity. Gastroenterology, 2013; DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.