Vitamin D May Lower Diabetes Risk In Obese Children And Adolescents

Share Button

obeseboyvectorbellyFrom Your Health Journal…..”Another interesting article from Science Daily that I wanted to promote entitled Vitamin D May Lower Diabetes Risk In Obese Children And Adolescents. We discuss here on a regular basis the obesity epidemic facing the youth of the world, as well as the increase of obesity related illness such as heart disease, weak joints, asthma, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. We know that children today have become very sedentary, where technology is consuming their lives, to a point where physical activity is minimal. Parents are always looking for solutions – quick ones! But, as we know, there are NO quick solutions to fighting obesity. A well-rounded healthy lifestyle is the best defense to keep the weight off children – including eating properly, exercise, sleep, and proper hydration. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease. The study suggested that by increasing vitamin D intake alone was nearly as powerful as what has been seen using a prescription drug. These are interesting findings, which needs more research, but nevertheless, very interesting. Remember, this does not take away the importance of proper exercise and diet, but important. Please visit the Science Daily web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

Childhood and adolescent obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically in the past three decades. Being obese puts individuals at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease in which individuals have too much sugar in their blood. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease.

“By increasing vitamin D intake alone, we got a response that was nearly as powerful as what we have seen using a prescription drug,” said Catherine Peterson, an associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at MU. “We saw a decrease in insulin levels, which means better glucose control, despite no changes in body weight, dietary intake or physical activity.”

Peterson and her colleagues studied 35 pre-diabetic obese children and adolescents who were undergoing treatment in the MU Adolescent Diabetic Obesity Program. All of those in the study had insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels and had similar diets and activity levels. Study participants randomly were assigned either a high-dose vitamin D supplement or a placebo that they took daily for six months. Those who took the supplement became vitamin D sufficient and lowered the amount of insulin in their blood.

“The vitamin D dosage we gave to the obese adolescents in our study is not something I would recommend for everyone,” Peterson said. “For clinicians, the main message from this research is to check the vitamin D status of their obese patients, because they’re likely to have insufficient amounts. Adding vitamin D supplements to their diets may be an effective addition to treating obesity and its associated insulin resistance.”

Vitamin D helps maintain healthy bones, muscles and nerves and enters bodies through sunlight exposure, diet or supplements. Vitamin D insufficiency is common; however, it can be more detrimental to those who are obese, Peterson said.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Comments are closed.