Sugar And Type 2 Diabetes

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obeseeatingFrom Your Health Journal…..A really great article and Q & A from one of my favorite writers, Nanci Hellmich of USA Today on the Detroit Free Press web site entitled Sugar availability linked to type 2 diabetes. I had to promote this article, as I feel it is very informative, educational, and well written. A recent study examined sugar and type 2 diabetes rates in 175 countries including the USA over the past decade and found that increased sugar availability in the food supply was associated with higher rates of type 2 diabetes. Please don’t read this and say “no kidding, isn’t that obvious.” The important finding from this study suggests that for every additional 150 calories of sugar (the amount in a 12-ounce can of soda) available per person per day, the incidence of type 2 diabetes rose by 1%. Does this mean it is a ’cause and effect’ – but nevertheless, it is an important finding. With obesity on the rise all over the world, type 2 diabetes is growing in many populations. Type 2 diabetes in most cases is environmental due to poor eating habits and less physical activity. For many, simply getting extra exercise, eating healthy portions – causing weight loss can result the elimination of type 2 diabetes. I encourage all of you to visit the Detroit Free Press web site (link provided below) to read the complete article and Q & A.”

From the article…..

Sugar is under the microscope again.

A recent study looked at sugar and type 2 diabetes rates in 175 countries including the USA over the past 10 years and found that increased sugar availability in the food supply was associated with higher rates of type 2 diabetes.

The research showed that for every additional 150 calories of sugar (the amount in a 12-ounce can of soda) available per person per day, the incidence of type 2 diabetes rose by 1%. Although the study doesn’t directly prove cause and effect, it has raised new concerns about sugar.

Almost 26 million U.S. adults and children have diabetes. In diabetes, the body does not make enough of the hormone insulin, or it doesn’t use it properly. Insulin helps glucose (sugar) get into cells, where it is used for energy. If there’s an insulin problem, sugar builds up in the blood, damaging nerves and blood vessels.

USA Today talked to the study’s lead author, Sanjay Basu, an assistant professor of medicine at Stanford Prevention Research Center. He’s a medical doctor and a statistician. The study was conducted while Basu was a medical resident at the University of California-San Francisco.

We also talked to endocrinologist Elizabeth Seaquist, president-elect of medicine and science for the American Diabetes Association and professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

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Global Sugar Intake Behind The Rise In Type 2 Diabetes

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diabeteswordFrom Your Health Journal…..A great article in one of my favorite web sites to promote called Red Orbit, written by Lawrence LeBlond. The article is entitled Global Sugar Intake Behind The Rise In Type 2 Diabetes. Obesity is on the rise all over the world, and one health risk factor associated with obesity is type 2 diabetes, which in many cases, is environmental – sometimes reversible with weight loss. Believe it or not, more than 350 million people around the glboe are believed to have diabetes, and for years health experts have debated on what the exact driver of the illness has been. While sugar intake has been viewed as a culprit in many eyes, scientists have long refuted that conjecture and attributed the global health crisis to too much overall food intake and obesity. Recently, a new study suggests through compelling evidence that Type 2 diabetes is being largely driven by the rising consumption of sugary foods and drinks. Please visit the Red Orbit web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

More than 350 million people worldwide are believed to have diabetes, and for years health experts have debated on what the exact driver of the illness has been. While sugar intake has been viewed as a culprit in many eyes, scientists have long refuted that conjecture and attributed the global health crisis to too much overall food intake and obesity.

But in a new finding by three California universities – Stanford, UC-Berkeley and UCSF – suggests through compelling evidence that Type 2 diabetes is being largely driven by the rising consumption of sugary foods and drinks. This evidence comes in the form of large-scale analysis of worldwide sugar availability over the last decade. The findings have been published in Wednesday’s (Feb. 27) issue of the journal PLoS ONE.

In all, the American researchers looked at sugar intake in 175 countries, including the United States. They found increases in sugar intake account for a third of all new cases of diabetes in the US and a quarter of all cases worldwide. In the countries studied, the researchers found an average 150-calorie-per-day increase in the availability of sugar – roughly the equivalent of a can of cola. This accounts for a rise in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes by 1.1 percent.

The team also found that, in the countries studied, an increase of 150-calories-per-day for all food, regardless of sugar content, only led to a 0.1 percent rise in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, adding credence to the evidence that sugar intake is a prominent driver for onset of diabetes.

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The study’s lead author, Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, said the finding was “quite a surprise.”

“We’re not diminishing the importance of obesity at all, but these data suggest that at a population level there are additional factors that contribute to diabetes risk besides obesity and total calorie intake, and that sugar appears to play a prominent role,” Basu said.

While the study cannot prove that sugar alone is causing diabetes, it does confirm that the longer a population is exposed to excess sugar, the higher its diabetes rate will be after taking obesity and other factors into account. The study also found that diabetes rates waned over time when sugar availability dropped, independent of changes in consumption of other calories.

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Artificial Sweeteners Tied To Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

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sodabottleFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting article recently from CBC News which links artificial sweetners tied to obesity with type 2 diabetes. Diet soda or juice and other artificially sweetened products may cause us to eat and drink even more calories and increase our risk for obesity and Type 2 diabetes according to recent research. Sugar substitutes are more intensely sweet than sugar and may rewire taste receptors so less sweet, healthier foods aren’t as enjoyable, shifting preferences to higher calorie, and sweeter foods. Exposure to high-intensity sweeteners could change the way that sweet tastes are processed.Exposure to high-intensity sweeteners could change the way that sweet tastes are processed, as well as interfere with brain chemistry and hormones that regulate appetite and satiety. This is a very interesting finding, as artificial sweeteners may have less calories, but trick the brain in ways that may not be beneficial to our health. Please visit the CBC web site to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

High-intensity sweetener changes metabolic responses

Diet pop and other artificially sweetened products may cause us to eat and drink even more calories and increase our risk for obesity and Type 2 diabetes, researchers are learning.

Former McGill University researcher Dana Small specializes in the neuropsychology of flavour and feeding at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. Small said there’s mounting evidence that artificial sweeteners have a couple of problematic effects. Sugar substitutes such as sucralose and aspartame are more intensely sweet than sugar and may rewire taste receptors so less sweet, healthier foods aren’t as enjoyable, shifting preferences to higher calorie, sweeter foods, she said.

Small and some other researchers believe artificial sweeteners interfere with brain chemistry and hormones that regulate appetite and satiety. For millennia, sweet taste signalled the arrival of calories. But that’s no longer the case with artificial sweeteners.

“The sweet taste is no longer signalling energy and so the body adapts,” Small said in an interview with CBC News. “It’s no longer going to release insulin when it senses sweet because sweet now is not such a good predictor of the arrival of energy.”

Susan Swithers, a psychology professor at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., studies behavioural neuroscience. “Exposure to high-intensity sweeteners could change the way that sweet tastes are processed,” she says.

“A number of epidemiological studies show that people who do consume high intensity sweeteners show differences in metabolic responses, have an increased risk for things like Type 2 diabetes and also have an increased risk for overweight and obesity.”

This week, researchers in France who followed the drinking habits of 66,000 women for 14 years reported that both regular and diet pop increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, but the risk was higher among diet drinkers — 15 per cent higher for consumption of as little as 500 ml per week and 59 per cent higher for those having 1.5 litres per week.

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First-Ever Guidelines Issued For Treating Type 2 Diabetes In Kids

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diabeticFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very important article recently from US News & World Report via HealthDay by Serena Gordon entitled First-Ever Guidelines Issued For Treating Type 2 Diabetes In Kids. I do encourage all of you to visit the UN News site to read about these new guidelines. I find it important to spread the word on such topic, and always try to send traffic to other great sites like US News. This article points to the the fact that for the first time ever, the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued new guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes in children and teenagers. Most pediatricians only dealt with Type 1 diabetes, but due to the rise in Type 2 diabetes in children, a change was needed. As many of you know, Type 2 diabetes used to be called ‘adult onset’ diabetes. In our modern day era, where many children are now obese or overweight, many young kids now get this disease, which is environmental. Weight doesn’t play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, but it’s possible that someone with type 1 could be overweight, making an immediate diagnosis of the type of diabetes very hard. Please visit the US News web site (link provided below) to view the complete article.”

From the article…..

For the first time ever, the American Academy of Pediatrics has issued guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes in children and teenagers aged 10 to 18.

Until recently, pediatricians have mostly had to deal with type 1 diabetes, which has a different cause and usually a different management than type 2 diabetes. But, today, due largely to the rise in childhood obesity, as many as one in three children diagnosed with diabetes has type 2.

“Pediatricians and pediatric endocrinologists are used to dealing with type 1 diabetes. Most have had no formal training in the care of children with type 2,” said one of the authors of the new guidelines, Dr. Janet Silverstein, division chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida, in Gainesville.

“The major reason for the guidelines is that there’s been an increase in overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, with more type 2 diabetes in that population, making it important for general pediatricians, as well as endocrinologists to have structured guidelines to follow,” she said.

For example, it can be very difficult to distinguish immediately whether or not a child has type 1 or type 2 diabetes, especially if a child is overweight. The only way to tell for sure is a test for islet antibodies. Because type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, a child or teen with type 1 will have islet antibodies that destroy the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. But, it can take weeks to get the results of these tests, according to Silverstein.

Weight doesn’t play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, but it’s possible that someone with type 1 could be overweight, making an immediate diagnosis of the type of diabetes very hard. If someone with type 1 diabetes is mistakenly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and given oral medications — such as metformin — instead of the insulin they must have, they can get very sick, very quickly.

To read the complete article…..Click here

FDA Approves 3 New Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

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diabetesglucoseFrom Your Health Journal…..”A great article today from Health via HealthDay about the FDA approving new drugs for type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is on the rise in adults and young children. It is also known as adult onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes. But, these names are not used as much anymore, especially since so many children are getting this disease. The article states that all three drugs contain a new active ingredient, alogliptin to help control blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Millions of US citizens have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and many more are unaware they are at high risk. Some groups have a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes than others. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, as well as the aged population. Please visit the Health web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. They have some great articles, and I always like to promote their site.”

From the article…..

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration late Friday approved three new medications to help people battle type 2 diabetes.

All three drugs contain a new active ingredient, alogliptin, either alone or in combination with other, previously approved medications. The newly approved drugs include Nesina (alogliptin), Kazano (alogliptin plus metformin) and Oseni (alogliptin plus pioglitazone), the FDA said in a news release.

“Controlling blood sugar levels is very important in the overall treatment and care of diabetes,” Dr. Mary Parks, director of the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in the statement. “Alogliptin helps stimulate the release of insulin after a meal, which leads to better blood sugar control.”

More than 24 million people in the United States are currently affected by type 2 diabetes, which is closely linked with obesity. In the type 2 form of the disease, people gradually develop resistance to insulin or fail to produce enough of the hormone, resulting in rising blood sugar levels. That can lead to other health problems, such as heart disease, vision problems and neural or kidney dysfunction.

The FDA urges that the new medications be used in combination with a healthy diet and exercise to help bring diabetes under control. All of the drugs underwent study either as stand-alone products or used alongside standard diabetes medications such as sulfonyureas or insulin.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Type 2 Diabetes On The Rise In Children

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From Your Health Journal…..”Great article today from the Minneapolis Star Tribune and Channel 10 (abc-tv) about diabetes rising in children. Please visit the Minneapolis Star Tribune and Channel 10 web sites to read the great stories, as I have enjoyed many article from their sites. Links are provided below. The article being reviewed today discusses the rise in type 2 diabetes in children. As you know, type 2 diabetes in most cases is environmental, so when children pack on the pounds, they increase their risk of getting this disease. More than 20,000 adolescents and teens in the United States now have Type 2 diabetes, compared with almost none 20 years ago. And the worst might be ahead. Diagnoses of the disease among young people could climb 400 percent by 2050. Please visit the Star Tribune and 10 News to read this heartwarming story about a young child who just found out she had type 2 diabetes.”

From the article…..

On learning she had Type 2 diabetes and would need to adopt a healthful diet for the rest of her life, Lavon Swygert did the only thing that felt natural.

The 13-year-old hid at home and gorged on potato chips.

“I’m not going to lie,” she said. “There were, like, 12 little packs of Pringles.”

Lavon’s response underscores why doctors are so troubled by the sharp increase in Type 2 diabetes that is emerging among adolescents and teens. It reveals the medical toll that doctors have long feared from the nation’s youth-obesity epidemic. Worse, it pairs a disorder that can be managed only by disciplined diet and exercise with a young, impulsive population that likes to snack.

More than 20,000 adolescents and teens in the United States now have Type 2 diabetes, compared with almost none 20 years ago. And the worst might be ahead. Diagnoses of the disease among young people could climb 400 percent by 2050, according to a federal estimate released in December, because the disease is tied to the rising rate of childhood obesity.

Type 2 diabetes, diagnosed mainly in adults until now, is the gradual erosion of the body’s production of insulin, which leaves excess sugar in the bloodstream and gives rise to a host of complications and organ failures. It’s among a growing number of adult health problems that are increasingly afflicting kids, including hypertension and high cholesterol.

“It’s like your child has the body of a 70-year-old man,” said Dr. Claudia Fox, an obesity specialist at the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital.

Part of the problem is that Type 2 diabetes often comes with relatively few initial symptoms, so teens can go years without a diagnosis. Even when the problem is discovered, as in Lavon’s case, teenagers often don’t initially feel the consequences of straying from diets and treatments.

To read the full article…..Click here

Can Childhood Stress Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

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From Your Health Journal…..”I was very happy to be quoted in this article. Type 2 diabetes is on the rise with children, and I believe the environment plays such a large part in all of this. Does stress directly cause type 2 diabetes? I don’t think directly, but indirectly, I feel in can contribute. Stress has a major impact on our bodies and life. It causes many of us to have weaker immune systems, get sick more often, become overly tired, increased risk for heart disease, and unhappy associated with low self esteem. For many children, it may even cause them to eat more at meals or snack often, eating foods higher in fat or heavily processed. If this happens on a regular basis, a child may risk becoming overweight or obese. Research has shown a direct correlation between obesity and type 2 diabetes. So, coming back ‘full circle’ – stress can indirectly cause type 2 diabetes when associated with other health concerns.”

From the article…..

To date, studies on the link have been small, but many doctors and patients alike feel that emotional and family stress can lead to the development of the disease.

Aaron Snyder, 35, of San Diego, a certified trainer and nutritional lifestyle coach and author of The New Diabetes Prescription: The Diet, Exercise, and Mindset Revolution, believes that childhood abuse played a role in his developing type 2 diabetes.

“I was an emotional eater since the age of 7, was extremely overweight and neglected,” he recalls. “This [was] perpetuated until my older brother, the abuser, moved out of the house when I was 13.”

As a consequence, Snyder was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age 23. “During those 10 years, I continued to suffer from emotional eating, depression, and anxiety that I have since overcome.” Now, Snyder says he’s been able to control his diabetes with diet and exercise and is 100 percent off of his medications.

Synder is not alone in believing that there’s a link between childhood stress and type 2 diabetes. Many adults who experience profound family stress as children may also be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life, a recent review of numerous studies published in the journal Discovery Medicine found. (There is, it’s worth noting, a clear link between depression, anxiety, and other kinds of emotional stress experienced in adulthood and the onset of type 2 diabetes.)

As an endocrinologist, Paul Strumph, MD, former vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation in New York, says he’s not surprised by a potential link between childhood stress and diabetes, caused by an acceleration of insulin resistance. “Increased risk for type 2 diabetes is one of the medical conditions that is recognized to be associated with a stressful home environment,” he notes. He adds that while stress at home is not the only factor that leads to diabetes, it certainly is an important one.

Len Saunders, a fitness expert based in Montville, N.J., who served as a consultant to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition and as an American Heart Association spokesman on childhood obesity, says that diabetes can stem from many sources, which are often intertwined. “Stress causes the immune system to weaken, making way for a ‘weaker’ body to get sick,” he explains. “Diabetes is not immune to this.” Family stress also causes many people to overeat and gain weight. “As they eat more, they sleep less, and all this could definitely contribute to type 2 diabetes as well,” Saunders adds.

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