Watching More TV As A Young Adult Predicts Obesity

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the University of Pittsburgh, please share your comments below…..

familytvSome people who watch more television than their peers are at increased risk for injuries, new University of Pittsburgh study finds.

The more hours young adults spend watching television each day, the greater the likelihood that they’ll have a higher body mass index and bigger waist circumference, a 15-year analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health revealed.

The association did not hold in later years, indicating that young adulthood is an important time to intervene and promote less television viewing, according to the research published online in the journal SAGE Open.

“We were quite surprised to find that television viewing was associated with subsequent obesity for young adults, but not for the middle-aged,” said lead author Anthony Fabio, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health. “This suggests that middle-aged adults may differ from young adults in how they respond to the influence of TV viewing.”

Dr. Fabio and his colleagues analyzed data from 3,269 adults recruited from Birmingham, Ala., Chicago, Minneapolis, and Oakland, Calif., who participated in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. For 15 years starting in 1990, the participants reported their television viewing habits and had their waist circumference measured and their body mass index (a measure of weight and height that can indicate obesity) calculated every five years.

The more time participants spent watching television when they were approximately 30 years old, the more likely they were to be obese five years later, compared to their peers who spent less time in front of the television. The team did not have data on younger ages.

Dr. Fabio and his team suspect many potential reasons for the association, including that young adults may be more likely to snack during television viewing and consume unhealthy food due to their greater susceptibility to the seduction of junk food advertising on television. In support of that hypothesis, the CARDIA study also found that participants were more likely to eat healthier foods as they aged.

The analysis found that 23 percent of the men and 20.6 percent of the women participating in the study watched four or more hours of television daily. Within that group of heavy TV watchers, 35.9 percent were black, and 8.6 percent were white; and 40.8 percent had a high school education or less, vs. 17.4 percent with an education beyond high school.

A lower family income and higher rates of smoking and drinking also were associated with more time spent watching television.

“Television viewing and obesity are both highly prevalent in many populations around the world,” said Dr. Fabio. “This means that even small reductions in television viewing could lead to vast public health improvements. Reducing sedentary time should be a healthy lifestyle guideline heavily promoted to the public. Our study indicates that the biggest bang for the buck would be in targeting young adults for interventions to reduce television viewing. Healthy lifestyle behaviors should start at early ages.”

Additional authors on this research are Chung-Yu Chen and Karen Matthews, Ph.D., of Pitt; Stephen Dearwater, M.S., of Jackson Memorial Hospital; David Jacobs, Ph.D., Darin Erickson, Ph.D., and Mark Pereira, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health; Carlos Iribarren, M.D., Ph.D., and Stephen Sidney, M.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente Northern California.

This research was funded by in part by research grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) (R03AG028504) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U49-CE000764). The CARDIA study is supported by contracts HHSN268201300025C, HHSN268201300026C, HHSN268201300027C, HHSN268201300028C, HHSN268201300029C and HHSN268200900041C from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Intramural Research Program of the NIA, and an intra-agency agreement between NIA and NHLBI (AG0005).

About the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, founded in 1948 and now one of the top-ranked schools of public health in the United States, conducts research on public health and medical care that improves the lives of millions of people around the world. Pitt Public Health is a leader in devising new methods to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases, HIV/AIDS, cancer and other important public health problems. For more information about Pitt Public Health, visit the school’s Web site at http://www.publichealth.pitt.edu.

Health Briefs TV To Present View On Obesity Update

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Article courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

obesityHealth Briefs TV will soon present a segment covering the updates on obesity.

Health Briefs TV is scheduled to present a View on obesity segment update. More than two-thirds of the American population is overweight or obese, according to a recently published report. The top-notch health and medical show will examine preventative steps communities, families and schools can take to combat the medical and societal problem. From corner stores to school lunch rooms and kitchen pantries, there are always healthy alternatives to choose. The health briefs segment will air soon on cable television networks – regionally and nationally – in the United States.

The Health Briefs TV show explores the emerging technologies, progressive treatments, revolutionary people, and innovative healthcare options that are all part of the global health industry. It explores topics relating to the health and medical fields and offers valuable information about the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many common ailments. The show’s producers take pride in sharing up-to-date, valuable information about new procedures, prevention tips and outstanding businesses. It also features interviews with innovative health and medical professionals in the industry.

The program is hosted by Kevin Harrington. It is headquartered in South Florida and films on location throughout the United States and Canada. It is broadcast on most regional and national cable television networks. The show is a proud leader of quality, educational programming. It is produced in part by Anthony DiMeglio, Melissa Leibowitz and Rob Marshall. Join the fans, the show’s staff on popular social sites to discuss and comment on stories of the day. Learn more about Health Briefs TV on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest and health-briefs.com.

Health Briefs TV Presents Segment On Preventing Heart Disease

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

active familyHealth Briefs TV will soon broadcast a segment focusing on steps to take to prevent heart disease.

Health Briefs TV producers are pleased to present a segment focusing on steps to take to prevent heart disease. Roughly 60,000 people perish from the fatal medical problem every year – more than lives taken by diseases such as cancer. Medical professionals lecture patients that healthy lifestyle changes can prevent the development of heart disease, and save lives. The medically-themed segment can be seen on regional cable television networks throughout the country.

The Health Briefs TV show explores the emerging technologies, progressive treatments, revolutionary people, and innovative healthcare options that are all part of the global health industry. It explores topics relating to the health and medical fields and offers valuable information about the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many common ailments. The show’s producers take pride in sharing up-to-date, valuable information about new procedures, prevention tips and outstanding businesses. It also features interviews with innovative health and medical professionals in the industry.

Health Briefs TV is hosted by Kevin Harrington. It is headquartered in South Florida and films on location throughout the United States and Canada. It is broadcast on most regional and national cable television networks. The show is a proud leader of quality, educational programming. It is produced in part by Anthony DiMellio, Melissa Leibowitz, Andrew Mazza, and Rob Marshall. Join the fans, the show’s staff on popular social sites to discuss and comment on stories of the day. Learn more about Health Briefs TV on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest and health-briefs.com.

Health Briefs TV Segment Focuses On Children’s Mental Health

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

Children’s mental health concerns will top a Health Briefs TV segment.

Children often have no guidance about dealing with mental health problems which can result in their developing anxiety, depression, addiction and leading to self-harm.

Health Briefs TV producers are pleased to announce work on a children’s mental health segment. It will encompass the leading complaints from children such as bullying, bereavement, domestic violence and family problems, and offer advice about how to handle them. Children often have no guidance about dealing with mental health problems which can result in their developing anxiety, depression, addiction and leading to self-harm. The informative segment is scheduled to air soon in the United States and Canada.

The Health Briefs TV show explores the emerging technologies, progressive treatments, revolutionary people, and innovative healthcare options that are all part of the global health industry. It explores topics relating to the health and medical fields and offers valuable information about the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many common ailments. The show’s producers take pride in sharing up-to-date, valuable information about new procedures, prevention tips and outstanding businesses. It also features interviews with innovative health and medical professionals in the industry.

The program is headquartered in South Florida, and films on location throughout the United States and Canada. It is broadcast on most regional and national cable television networks. The show is a proud leader of quality, educational programming. Join the fans, the show’s staff and its host on many of the popular social sites to discuss and comment on stories of the day. Learn more about Health Briefs TV on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest and usmstudios.com.

Four Ways That Watching TV Can Kill You Prematurely

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By Dr. Michael Wald

familytv1. The average American wastes years in the seated position. This can lead to increased death risk from heart attack and stroke. People should be mindful of standing periodically when watching TV; doing jumping jacks; push-ups; sit ups; stationary bike – anything that promotes circulation and involves increasing ones heart rate.

2. Sitting increases the risk of developing clots in the legs called deep vein thrombosis or DVTs – a condition that can result in death of lung tissue (pulmonary infarction), cerebral stroke and death. While sitting raising ones heels off the floor (both feet), either at the same or alternately, promotes venous drainage of blood in the feet and legs improving blood flow towards the heart; sluggish or pooled blood in the lower extremities can cause blood to coagulate (stick) forming clots (DVTs). These clots then can go to the heart, lungs and brain and cause life threatening health problems. Sitting with the feet elevated also decreases the risk of developing potentially deadly DVTs.

3. Sitting also promotes weight gain from a slowed metabolism. If one must sit, raising the arms above head alternately, or each arm one at a time, will speed up metabolic rate, burn calories and reduce all causes of premature morbidity and mortality. Sedentary living leads to increased cardiovascular risk; loss of muscle mass and tone; fat and water retention and even memory loss just to name a few hazards.

scale4. Prolonged sitting while watching TV promotes weight gain associated with increased cholesterol and triglyceride levels by increasing insulin levels. Hyperinsulinemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease when associated with blood sugar problems. Eventually, prolonged inactivity such as TV watching will fatigue the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin, causing hypoinsulinemia (low insulin levels). This raises blood sugar and causes diabetes. Diabetes is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

7 Healthy Snacks For TV Couch Time

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

familytv#1: Popcorn

At home you can prepare popcorn in a healthy way. Air-popped popcorn is a relatively healthy treat. Three cups of popcorn have just 93 calories and 1.5 grams of fat. Do not add butter or salt.

#2: Pistachios, Walnuts or Almonds

Nuts are a great heart-healthy snack full of antioxidants, fiber, and good fats. A 1/2-cup serving only has 170 calories, with 6 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber. However, they contain 14 grams of fat, so do not stuff yourself on them.

#3: Red Grapes

At the top of the pile is red grapes. Full of anti-oxidants and vitamins, red grapes are nature’s answer to sweet candy. There will never be a processed snack food that comes close to matching the nutrition and health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They’re good frozen, too.

#4: Pita Chips with Hummus or Guacamole

This is another snack you must make on your own if you want it healthy. All you need is a large, whole-wheat pita. Cut the edge of the pita into chip-size pieces. and then bake them in the oven until crispy before serving with hummus or guacamole dip.

#5: Relish Tray

Pickled vegetables are extremely low in calories and a great alternative to snacking on high fat, high sugar processed foods. Marinating your vegetables in vinegar or heart-healthy olive oil will control the amount of salt you eat.

pizza#6: Mini-pizzas

All you need is a whole-wheat pita round, low sodium tomato sauce and non-fat mozzarella cheese. Pile on the vegetables and herbs for great taste and enjoyment. Bake for 10-15 minutes in an oven at 400˚.

#7: Green Tea

You may not think this is technically a snack, but the health benefits of drinking just one cup of green tea a day can allow you to splurge a little more than usual and still keep your figure intact. (1)

For more information about cholesterol levels, diet and exercise visit: www.HeartEasy.com

– Kac Young , a former television director and producer, has earned a Ph.D. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding.

While earning her Ph.D. in Natural Health and a Doctorate in Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University.

She also earned a doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. Her practice includes, weight control, smoking cessation, behavior modification, stress reduction, past-life regression, meditation training and phobia management. Her books include: “Heart Easy, The Food Lover’s Guide to Heart Healthy Eating,” “Discover Your Spiritual Genius,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Dancing with the Moon,” “21 Days to the Love of Your Life,” “Gold Mind,” “Cheese Dome Power,” The Path to Fabulous,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies” and “Supreme Healing.”

References: (1) Inspired by: www.mydailymoment.com

Modifying Kids’ TV Habits May Improve Behavior

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familytvFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting article today in the Daily Comet via USA Today written by Michelle Healy entitled Modifying Kids’ TV Habits May Improve Behavior. We have discussed on Your Health Journal about the current generation of children being a technology generation. They have so much access to it via computers, video games, hand held devices, and televisions. One of my concerns it they have become very sedentary, to a point where many of them are becoming overweight or obese. Along with this, they are developing obese related illnesses due to their sedentary lifestyles, as many children are showing risk factors for heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancers, or weak joints. Now a recent study examined how modifying television content affects the development of young children ages 3 to 5, researchers report that six months after families reduced their kids’ exposure to aggressive and violence-filled programming and increased exposure to enriching and educational programming — even without changing the number of viewing hours — kids demonstrated statistically significant improved behavior compared to children whose media diet went unchanged. In the U.S., preschoolers watch nearly 4.5 hours of TV a day, “an alarming amount,” that too often includes age-inappropriate programming, from Mighty Morphin Power Rangers to adult action movies such as Batman. Young children “learn by imitating what they see,” and for preschoolers, “a lot of what they see is on TV.” Please visit the Daily Comet web site to read this full article. A link is provided below. The article was very educational, and a must read for parents.”

From the article…..

Want to improve your preschoolers’ behavior? Be choosy when it comes to the television shows they watch — even if you don’t reduce the amount of time they spend watching them, a study finds.

In one of the largest studies yet to examine how modifying television content affects the development of young children ages 3 to 5, researchers report that six months after families reduced their kids’ exposure to aggressive and violence-filled programming and increased exposure to enriching and educational programming — even without changing the number of viewing hours — kids demonstrated statistically significant improved behavior compared to children whose media diet went unchanged.

And the improvements — declines in aggression and being difficult and increases in healthy social behaviors such as empathy, helpfulness and concern for others — persisted at 12 months, says the study involving 565 families in today’s Pediatrics.

Overall, the amount of television viewed did not decrease, but all kids’ behavior improved, and low-income boys, who tend to watch the most TV, benefited the most, says study author Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

(In a separate Pediatrics report from New Zealand, researchers found that the more television watched during childhood and adolescence, the greater the risk of having a criminal conviction, a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, or more aggressive personality traits as an adult. In that study, every extra hour of television watched by children on a weeknight increased by 30 percent the risk of having a criminal conviction by age 26.)

To read the complete article…..Click here

Food Marketers To Kids: You Can Run, But You Can’t Hide

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From Your Health Journal…..”Most of my regular visitors know one of my favorite sites to plug is called Take Part. I love their site, and always telling people to go there for quality, informative articles. Today’s review comes from this site called, Food Marketers To Kids: You Can Run, But You Can’t Hide by By Steve Holt – who did an excellent job. I encourage all of you to visit the Take Part site (link provided below) to read the complete article. Parents not only have to worry about ads on TV that promote unhealthy eating, now they have to worry about marketing to children on the internet. In a recent report, the FTC found that while overall spending on food marketed to children fell nearly 20 percent between 2006 and 2009, online marketing increased by 50 percent in that same time period. This may be a larger problem, as many children spend more time on their computers than the TV. Why has nothing happened? One of the biggest reasons change has been so minimal in coming to the marketing and nutrition of kids’ foods is that few meaningful standards exist, leaving companies to regulate themselves on a voluntary basis. Please, visit the Take Part web site to read the complete article. It is an important one to read!”

Short snip from the article…..

Television isn’t the only place for companies to pedal their unhealthy wares anymore—online sites and games are the new frontier.

It’s not enough anymore for parents to worry about the food advertising their children see on television. No, food companies have laid claim to new hunting grounds for the hearts, minds and bellies of America’s youth, 32 percent of whom are overweight or obese: the Internet.

In a report published in late December, the FTC found that while overall spending on food marketed to children fell nearly 20 percent between 2006 and 2009, online marketing increased by 50 percent in that same time period.

Food companies spent $1.8 billion to market food to children ages 2-17 in 2009, but the data clearly shows that companies only shifted their marketing bucks away from expensive television ads to media where children are spending more of their time—the Internet and mobile devices.

The sneaky tactics food companies now use online—like embedding junk food advertising in interactive games on popular websites like Nick.com—reach children who are completely unaware they are being targeted, says Jennifer Harris, director of marketing initiatives at Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

“There are no controls over online advertising to kids like there are for children’s television,” she says. “Companies can basically advertise any way they want on the Internet. They’re taking advantage of children’s inability to critically review advertising.”

The ubiquitous nature of Internet food ads and their success attracting kids may be startling, but it should come as no surprise. Older youth aged eight to 18 spend as much as seven hours a day online and kids under five use the Internet weekly.

Harris says research has shown that children don’t recognize advertising as well online as when they see it on television, especially when they’re cleverly disguised as games. When food ads are embedded in online games, children may even eat more food—and more junk food in particular. In a study published in late December, Dutch researchers had eight- to 10-year-olds play food- and non-food-related memory games on the Internet and then offered them bowls of jelly candy, chocolate, sliced bananas, and apples. The kids who played the food games ate more of the unhealthy food—and twice as much food overall—than the kids who played non-food games or no game at all.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Kids’ Obesity Is A Cultural Problem

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From Your Health Journal…..”A great article today from the Jackson Sun with very informative material from Dr. Joani Jack discussing childhood obesity, who feels excessive amounts of food and lack of exercise are two factors leading to the rise of childhood obesity. Dr. Jack does not feel it is a medical problem, yet a cultural problem. While lack of physical activity is a problem, factors such as children drinking too many sweetened beverages and sitting in front of a TV screen too long contribute to obesity as well. Add to this computers, video games, phones, hand held devices, and dozens of other forms of technology, and we have a very sedentary generation. Small changes to a child’s environment are important, as this generation of children’s life expectancy may be shorter than their parents. Too many children face challenges including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Please visit the Jackson Sun web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

Excessive amounts of food and lack of exercise are two factors leading to the rise of childhood obesity, said Dr. Joani Jack, pediatrician and faculty member of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Chattanooga and medical director of the Healthy Eating and Living Education program.

“We are faced with something that most generations have never faced,” Jack said, as childhood obesity rates have experienced a gradual and continual increase in the past 10 years.

Jack and Deborah Usry, HEALED’s director of training, met with more than 30 primary care doctors, physicians’ assistants and nurses Friday night and Saturday morning at the Jackson-Madison County General Hospital to provide solutions to help lower childhood obesity rates.

Jack and Usry encouraged medical professionals to include obesity care with regular preventive screenings. Usry said diagnosing a weight problem early can prevent a child from experiencing future health issues, including diabetes and hypertension.

“American kids eat more, eat worse and are less active than ever before,” Jack said. “It’s not a medical problem. It’s really a cultural problem that has medical consequences.”

Jack said the mid-1980s marked the beginning of a dramatic increase in childhood obesity. The southeastern states, including Tennessee, have the highest obesity rates nationwide. According to the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health, 37 percent of Tennessee children are either overweight or obese.

While lack of physical activity is a problem, Usry said factors such as children drinking too many sweetened beverages and sitting in front of a TV screen too long contribute to obesity as well.

To read the full article…..Click here

Bedroom TV Ups Obesity Risk In Kids

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From Your Health Journal…..”A study was completed that found children with a television in their bedroom had a higher risk of becoming obese. The study found that participants with a TV in the bedroom and those who watched TV more than two hours a day were each associated with up to 2.5 times the odds of the highest levels of fat mass. This makes sense as children love to snuggle up in bed at night and watch some TV, many without their parents even knowing. On top of this, they have access to many other types of technology to keep them busy. Many decades ago, I started a program called Commercial-cizing (See more about this at bottom of page) to help kids exercise while they watched TV, so this problem has been around for years.”

From the article…..

Children watching TV in bedrooms might have greater chances of becoming obese, says a US study.

A team from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Los Angeles linked the relationship between watching TV in bedrooms and childhood obesity, especially larger waists.

“The established association between TV and obesity is predominantly based on BMI (Body Mass Index which is height-to-weight ratio). The association between TV and fat mass, adiposity stored in specific depots (including abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue) and cardiometabolic risk, is less well understood,” says lead investigator Peter T. Katzmarzyk, from Pennington.

To read the full article…..Click here

About Commercial-cizing

The amount of overweight or obese children has significantly gone up over the last couple of decades. It is fair to state there are many children all over the world that have become very sedentary. They sit in front of the television, work on the computer, play video games, or read too many comics. To be honest, most of us are probably guilty of this once in a while, although, we should try to exercise every day!

So, here was the dilemma. The children who watch over 20 hours of TV per week were most likely not getting the recommended amount of daily exercise. How do you get them to exercise without taking away their television privileges?

Realistically, some parents should probably cut the amount of TV time down about 50%. The problem is; who is going to monitor this if both parents are working late, and the child is responsible for their own actions when they come home? There has to be a way to get children to exercise while they watched television. Did you realize that every 8-10 minutes most channels were devoted to commercial time? How about if a child committed to exercise every time a new commercial came on the TV? Thus, the phrase ‘Commercial-CIZE’ was born. Children should pick realistic exercise goals to perform during commercials. Acceptable guidelines should be created between adult and child. The impact will be amazing.