Signs, Dangers And Treatments For Concussions

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Medicine in Motion, please share your thoughts below…..

newsMost injuries sustained on the sports field have obvious tell-tale signs such as pain, bleeding, swelling or discoloration. The nature of a concussion, however, can make it extremely challenging to recognize at first glance – the physical evidence is hidden beneath the injured person’s skull, after all. Concussions are commonplace among high school athletes, affecting about 63,000 students every year.

Although many injured athletes are eager to get back into the game, a person suspected of having a concussion should immediately be removed or remove themselves from a game or any activity or sport. An increase in heart rate can worsen symptoms, but perhaps more importantly, a quick return to activity significantly increases the injured person’s risk of an even more serious brain injury. A doctor should always be consulted before an athlete returns to a sport or activity.

“Concussions are serious business, but we don’t always know how severe the damage is immediately after the injury occurs,” said Dr. Martha Pyron, Austin sports medicine doctor and owner of Medicine in Motion. “If you or your child has taken a blow to the head, you might be wondering if a concussion has developed. I recommend referring to our symptoms checklist and heading to a doctor if you have even the slightest suspicion that it is a concussion. The healing process may take time, but a quick response will be your athlete’s best bet for a solid recovery.”

Concussion facts and tips:

1. What is a concussion? It is the mildest form of brain injury, but can still lead to death and/or permanent brain damage if not treated properly.

2. How does a concussion occur? Usually, it is from a blow to the head, but a person can get a concussion by just abruptly stopping, even if he or she does not hit their head.

3. What are the consequences of a concussion? Usually, if treated properly, concussions resolve without any long term consequences. But if not treated properly, and sports are attempted while still recovering from a concussion, the concussion can lead to permanent brain damage or even death.

4. What are symptoms of a concussion? Headache is the most common symptom of concussion, but it is not always present. Nausea, ringing in the ears, sensitivity to light, confusion, difficulty with concentration, behavioral changes, slurred speech, dizziness, blurry vision, sleep disturbance, and emotional changes can all occur.

5. How is a concussion treated? The brain must rest. At first this may mean rest from ALL activity including talking on the phone, watching TV, or even reading. Eventually, the concussion resolves and the athlete returns to all activity without difficulty.

6. How does a person know when their concussion has resolved? It is difficult to tell sometimes. But generally, three things need to be in place: 1. All symptoms have resolved; 2. The physician’s physical exam of the concussed person is normal; and 3. The person is able to think clearly and use their brain at the same level as prior to the injury.

7. How does a person know if they are able to use their brain the same as before? There are computerized tests which can measure concentration, memory and reaction times. If this test is taken before the head injury as a baseline, it can be used as a measure of when the test scores return to normal after the injury.

8. Where should a person go if they think they have a concussion? If a person is injured and their symptoms are worsening despite rest, they should go to the ER. If they have symptoms which occur that they think are related to a concussion, they should seek medical care from a physician who has experience with concussions and has the ability to test concentration and memory skills. Otherwise, it may be difficult to tell when the concussion has been resolved. Medicine in Motion has the capability to do a full evaluation.

– Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

Dry And Irritated Eyes: Effective Treatments From Your Kitchen

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By Melissa Holden

eyeSome common health ailments are uncomfortable enough to cry about. Those with dry and irritated eyes deal with temporary, and in some cases, long-term pain and discomfort. Causes vary and include old age, hormonal changes, and mucus production in the tear glands. Luckily, effective treatments exist, and even better, they can be found in the kitchen.

Causes of Dry and Irritated Eyes

Eyes get dry due to short or long-term issues. Eyes become dry because tears evaporate quickly or due to a lack of moisture produced by glands. Causes include old age, hormones, decreased oil or water, damage to tear glands, autoimmune diseases, lupus, and other ailments.

Behavior contributes to dry and irritated eyes. A decrease in blinking can irritate the eyes and may take place when watching too much television or working on the computer. When paying great attention to the screen, people ‘forget’ to blink, which results in dry and irritated eyes. Additionally, wearing contact lenses adds to dryness, irritation, and eye strain. Bacterial keratitis is linked to contact lenses; as the lens rests on the eye, free circulation and tears are obstructed, which leads to tear evaporation and dry eye syndrome.

Particular health conditions and a lack of vitamin A contribute to eye problems, specifically dry and irritated eyes. In addition to prescribed medications, solutions are found in the home.

Home Remedies for Dry and Irritated Eyes

Since dehydration can be the cause of dry eyes, water is a simple solution. Consuming 8 to ten glasses per day helps dry eye patients and aids in recovering from dry eye syndrome.

Eyes get dry when people are sleeping. A lubricant can be applied before going to bed so eyes stay moist through the night. A washcloth dipped in water is a simple solution. Also, abstaining from washing and overly drying eyes helps avoid irritation.

Take breaks from working so eyes get enough rest. As mentioned, a lack of blinking leads to dry and irritated eyes. Make an effort to blink often to help eyes stay moist. Blinking also helps spread tears to the side of the eyes.

Those with dry eyes often rub, which causes inflammation as dust and microbes gain entry into the eyes. Avoid rubbing or touching around the eye area with unwashed fingers.

Cucumbers, freshly cut and chilled, can be placed on the eyes, which numbs the dry sensation and provides relief.

Flaxseed oil, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, helps treat dry eyes. Put flaxseed oil in fruits and drinks.

Castor oil helps retain water. It’s a great remedy for dry eyes. You can place drops of castor oil directly into eyes.

Mix a few drops of lavender oil with a cup of water. Dip a washcloth in the mixture and apply to affected eyes. The solution soothes eyes and makes for a readily accessible home remedy.

Dip a cotton ball in rose water or cold milk and apply to closed eyes. Leave the milk or rose water on for about 10 minutes, which allows the eyes to relax as it reduces strain.

One’s surroundings influences eye moisture. Use a humidifier or air cleaner to avoid dry eyes and to keep them moist. Those in particularly dry regions, such as Colorado, should use methods of countering the dryness in the air.

Aloe treats dry eyes. The gel or viscous liquid inside the leaf may be applied to the eyelid. Believed to reduce the symptoms of dry eyes, aloe is effective when placed on the lids but avoid direct contact with eyes, as it may increase irritation.

We are what we eat. Proper nutrition keeps eyes moist and healthy. Essential fatty acids are present in fish oil, and omega-3 and 6 acids are found in dried fruits and grains. Eat walnuts, sesame, grape seeds, almonds, and whole grains.

Grapes support eye health and are known to prevent retinal diseases.

Lastly, soaking a towel in warm water and placing it on the face for fifteen to twenty minutes maintains eye moisture.

What to Avoid

Common things add to irritation. It’s important to take note of what to avoid such as dry environments and air condition.

If you’re prone to dry eyes, avoid dry areas and situations, such as being around smoke or using a hair dryer.

Staying in air conditioned environments for a lengthy period makes eyes drier than normal.

Limit computer use. If you use a computer at work, take breaks often and rest your eyes.

Excessive coffee consumption intensifies dry eyes and has been linked to dry eye syndrome.

Acidic foods, such as tomato products, vinegar, and tamarind, aggravate affected eyes.

For some dry eyes and subsequent irritation is common, yet effective treatments are found in most households or at a local grocery store.

– Melissa Holden has been involved in natural healthcare most of her life. Aiming to spread the word further that nature can cure, she writes for health and wellness sites, green/eco sites and more. Read TheAlternativeDaily.com for additional home remedies that relieve dry and irritated eyes.

Moderate Exercise May Make Cancer Treatments More Effective

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News from Kansas State University

newsKansas State University kinesiology research offers encouraging information for cancer patients: A brisk walk or a slow jog on a regular basis may be the key to improved cancer treatments.

Brad Behnke, associate professor of exercise physiology, and collaborators have shown that moderate exercise on a regular basis enhances tumor oxygenation, which may improve treatments in cancer patients. Now Behnke is using a $750,000 American Cancer Society grant to study moderate exercise as a way to make radiation treatments more effective, especially for difficult-to-treat tumors.

“If we can increase the efficacy of radiation treatment, then the patient’s prognosis is enhanced,” Behnke said. “An intervention like exercise has almost universally positive side effects versus other treatments that can have deleterious side effects. Exercise is a type of therapy that benefits multiple systems in the body, and may permanently alter the environment within the tumor.”

The National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health recommends exercise for cancer patients and cancer survivors, but little research shows what happens within the tumors during such exercise. That prompted Behnke to combine his expertise in integrative physiology with cancer research. He also has received support from the university’s Johnson Cancer Research Center.

“I became interested in finding out what happens within the tumor during and after exercise as a means to enhance treatment outcomes,” Behnke said.

For the latest research, Behnke is using prostate cancer tumor models to find ways to enhance oxygen delivery to tumors. When a tumor is hypoxic, or has low oxygen, it is often very aggressive, Behnke said. Because oxygen is a “radiosensitizer,” it helps destroy cancer cells. As a result, low-oxygen tumors often are resistant to traditional cancer therapies, such as radiation therapy, and interventions, such as concentrated oxygen breathing, are used to get more oxygen to the tumor before treatment.

“If we manipulate all the systems in the body — the lungs, the heart and the blood vessels — with exercise, we can take advantage of the dysfunctional vasculature in the tumor and enhance blood flow to the tumor,” Behnke said. “The tumor becomes the path of least resistance for the elevated cardiac output of exercise, which results in a substantial increase in tumor oxygenation during and after exercise.”

But the key is moderate exercise, said Behnke. Too little exercise may have no effect, but too much exercise may have a negative effect and may shut down blood flow to the tumor region or impair the immune system.

Moderate exercise is an activity that uses 30 to 60 percent of someone’s aerobic capacity, Behnke said. The activity is nonstrenuous and is something that most people can perform, such as a brisk walk or a slow jog.

Research also has shown that moderate exercise can help cancer patients counteract some of the side effects of treatment — such as low blood count, fatigue, cachexia and lost muscle mass — which has led to many researchers labeling this as “aerobic exercise therapy” for patients with cancer, Behnke said.

“There really aren’t any negative side effects of moderate-intensity exercise,” Behnke said. “Exercise is often prescribed to improve the side effects of cancer and treatment, but what exercise is doing within the tumor itself is likely beneficial as well.”

Behnke and collaborators have published their exercise and cancer research in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

At Kansas State University, Behnke is collaborating with Mary Lynn Higginbotham, assistant professor of clinical sciences; Katie Heinrich, assistant professor of kinesiology; and David Poole, professor of kinesiology. The American Cancer Society grant, “Modulation of tumor oxygenation to enhance radiotherapy,” also involves University of Florida researchers in tumor microenvironment biology.

Cancer Treatments From Around The World

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qaQ & A With Dr. Michael Wald

1. Coffee enemas are the best single method of detoxification for a person with cancer.

ANSWER. False. Although they possess detox ability, coffee enemas simply do not contain the necessary nutrition to support specific detox pathways, which are dependent on the toxin or toxins in question; this must be determined based on clinical interview and lab testing.

2. A macrobiotic, vegetarian or raw diet is the best dietary approaches for one with cancer.

ANSWER. Regardless of the type of special food plan in question, the very best plan must be based on the needs of the individual. A raw diet may over tax an individual’s ability to produce natural enzymes and a particular diet may be deficient in one or more nutrients that are required by the specific patient who has cancer.

3. Intravenous vitamin C, as opposed to oral vitamin C, produced anticancer effects such as tumor killing through by being an antioxidant.

ANSWER. False. Intravenous vitamin C has been proven to work in cancer because it is an oxidant and NOT an antioxidant.

4. Hydrogen peroxide is a potential cancer-killing agent.

ANSWER. Yes. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by white blood cells in the body and does have cancer cell killing effects.

5. Apigenin is an herb that has proven ovarian cell cancer killing effects.

ANSWER. True.

6. According to the American Cancer Society, green tea drinkers in East Asia have a lower risk of stomach, breast and colon cancer than non-tea drinkers.

ANSWER. True; however, the amount of active elements in green tea consumed by Americans cannot be expected to be the same. Also, it is best to take the active ingredients of green tea when one has cancer as opposed to drinking tea only.

7. The form of vitamin D currently available in health food stores is the type that has been used in most medical studies for cancer prevention and treatment.

ANSWER. False. The active form of vitamin D3, known as 1, 25-D3, is the major anticancer form of vitamin D. This is a prescription item.

8. The optimal level of vitamin D measured on blood work is between 20 and 100 mg/dL.

ANSWER. False. Although the accepted clinical range of vitamin D tested on blood is between 20 and 100, optimal levels are approximately 75 and are associated with the lowest morbidity and mortality.

9. The evidence for toxic levels of vitamin D is when blood vitamin D is high.

ANSWER. False. The level of vitamin D in the blood can be high, but this does not mean it’s toxic. High calcium levels, known as, hypercalcemia is evidence that too much vitamin D is present. The treatment is to remove the vitamin D until the calcium levels come down (in a few days) and then restart vitamin D at a lower dose. Simple as that!

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Cancer Treatments From Around The World

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qaQ & A With Dr. Michael Wald

1. Coffee enemas are the best single method of detoxification for a person with cancer?

ANSWER. False. Although possessing detox ability, coffee enemas simply do not contain the necessary nutrition to support specific detox pathways, which are dependent on the toxin or toxins in question; this must be determined based on clinical interview and lab testing.

2. A macrobiotic, vegetarian or raw diet is the best dietary approaches for one with cancer?

ANSWER. Regardless of the type of special food plan in question, the very best plan must be based on the needs of the individual. A raw diet may over tax an individual’s ability to produce natural enzymes and, a particular diet may be deficient in one or more nutrients that are required by the specific patient who has cancer.

3. Intravenous vitamin C, as opposed to oral vitamin C, produced anticancer effects such as tumor killing through by being an antioxidant?

ANSWER. False. Intravenous vitamin C has been proven to work in cancer because it is an oxidant and NOT an antioxidant.

4. Hydrogen peroxide is a potential cancer killing agent?

ANSWER. Yes. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by white blood cells in the body and does have cancer cell killing effects.

5. Apigenin is an herb that has proven ovarian cell cancer killing effects?

ANSWER. True.

6. According to the American Cancer Society, green tea drinkers in East Asia have a lower risk of stomach, breast and colon cancer than non-tea drinkers?

ANSWER. True; however, the amounts of active elements in green tea consumed by Americans cannot be expected to be the same. Also, it is best to take the active ingredients of green tea when one has cancer as opposed to drinking tea only.

7. The form of vitamin D currently available in health food stores is the type that has been used in most medical studies for cancer prevention and treatment?

ANSWER. False. The active form of vitamin D3, known as 1, 25-D3, is the major anticancer form of vitamin D. This is a prescription item.

8. The optimal level of vitamin D measured on blood work is between 20 and 100 mg/dL?

ANSWER. False. Although the accepted clinical range of vitamin D tested on blood is between 20 and 100, optimal levels are approximately 75 and are associated with the lowest morbidity and mortality.

9. The evidence for toxic levels of vitamin D are when blood vitamin D are high?

ANSWER. False. The level of vitamin D in the blood can be high, but this does not mean it’s toxic. High calcium levels, known as, hypercalcemia is evidence that too much vitamin D is present. The treatment is to remove the vitamin D until the calcium levels come down (in a few days) and then restart vitamin D at a lower dose. Simple as that!

– Dr. Michael Wald, Brain-Energy Blast