The A-B-C’s Of Heart Healthy Foods

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By Kac Young Ph.D, DCH, ND

healthywordsWe’re definitely back to school this time of year and in the thick of it. While we’re busy hitting the books and the showers after a good game of football, let’s try to remember the A-B-C’s of healthy eating, too.

When it’s time for snacks, or making a food choice, use this chart and be the head of your class.

A – Apples
B – Blueberries
C – Carrots
D – Dates
E – Edamame
F – Flaxseed
G – Grapes
H – Hummus
I – Ice berg lettuce
J – Juice – fresh, without added sugars.
K – Kiwi
L – Lima beans
M – Mandarin oranges
N – Nuts, unsalted
O – Oatmeal
P – Peppers
Q – Quinoa
R – Raspberries
S – Sweet potatoes
T – Tomatoes
U – Umbrella fruit
V – Vegetables!
W – Whole grains
X – XiQua (Chinese watermelon)
Y – Yoghurt
Z – Zucchini

Included in this list are healthy foods for the heart, the brain and for the whole body. Skip the candy and the fried or processed foods and stick with this list. If you do, you’ll stay out of the nurses’ station, the doctor’s office and have more time for fun with friends, family and school events. These A-B-C’s will never let you down. They will always help you up and out.

– Kac Young, a former television director and producer, has earned a Ph.D. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding.

Nutritional Synergism — Just The Right Mix!

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qaQ & A With Dr. Michael Wald

1. What is Nutritional Synergism (NS)?

NS is a term that describes the supportive and positive health boosting effects of combinations of nutrients with nutrients; nutrients with foods; foods with nutrients and/or medications. Synergistic combinations can enhance the effects of each of the combined compounds far beyond 1 plus 1. More like, 1 plus 1 = 10! NS can literally make the difference between using the “right stuff” and it failing or success! Here is what you need to know:

EXAMPLES OF POSITIVE SYNERGISM

For example, if vitamin D had an effect of “ 5” in the body and melatonin “5” together they would have the power of “20”! Certain antibiotics combined with probiotics such as bifi dobacterium, saccromyces boulardii and/or lactobacillus acidophilus and plant enzymes help reduce side-effects of antibiotics and help them penetrate more deeply into tissues so they work better. Here are more important examples of POSITIVE NS Vitamin A and D; melatonin and curcumin; EFA and fat soluble vitamins; vitamin C and selenium and vitamin E and selenium; B12 and folic acid; cysplatin and NAC, methotrexate 5FU and folic acid; oxidizing forms of chemotherapy and intravenous (not oral) vitamin C, etc. There are literally hundreds of examples of NS.

2.Is just combining several types of nutrients together always synergistically?

No. Very often patients that come to us have combined several powerful nutrients thinking that, because they are “natural” or “for the immune system”, that they help each other work better; not always true. See the example below of NEGATIVE synergism.

EXAMPLES OF NEGATIVE SYNERGISM

For a very ill person who must be careful to take the most perfect balance of nutrition possible, paying attention to nutritional synergism could make the difference between life and death. Zinc can act as an immune enhancer and so can n-acetyl cysteine (NAC), but when taken together zinc is bound-up (chelated) and therefore not effective. Iron with vitamin C causes the vitamin C to become oxidized and harmful. Copper and fi sh oils combined cause harmful oxidation (breakdown) to the oil – very dangerous to consume!

3. How can being mindful of NS make the difference for you?

First thing is knowing that NS exists – now you do! Second, get nutritional testing and a Blood Detective interpretation. Don’t know what this is? Visit: http://www.intmedny.com/blood-detective.php

4. How do you figure out how to best use the principles of NS?

Knowing where to start with nutritional food and lifestyle efforts is essential for long-term success. Visit with us for a comprehensive medical and nutritional interview to gain clarity around your health concerns and goals. If you know where you’re going you’re more likely to get there!

– Dr. Michael Wald, Brain-Energy Blast

For more information about this or other topics please go to: www.intmedny.com

The Importance Of Dental Health

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By Dana Smith

brushteethDental health occupies a vital role in determining the overall health of the human body. It refers to the healthy functioning of the teeth and gums which should be free from bacterial infection, cavities and bad breath. People who seldom rinse their mouth after consuming junk food and sweets are susceptible to tooth infections, loss of tooth, decay and gum problems. Today there are many dental offices in the neighborhood for effective dental treatments. The Anchorage dental clinic offers all types of dental treatments and specializes in a dental emergency.

Importance of Brushing and Flossing

Regular brushing and flossing of the teeth is very essential to maintain dental hygiene and health. Doctors recommend regular brushing at least twice a day. Both adults and children are advised to brush their teeth once in the morning after waking up and at night before going to bed. In most cases, both children and adults brush their teeth hurriedly which can lead to poor dental hygiene. Cavities, plaque, bleeding gums and so forth are some of the most common dental problems faced by most of the people today. When faced with dental problems, most people approach emergency dentist in Anchorage to obtain best treatments.

Dietary Practices

For effective dental health, it is quite important to abstain from consuming alcohol, unhealthy snacks, sweetened dishes and drinks. It is also pertinent to include a lot of dietary fiber in your diet along with fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish and so forth. It is also important to avoid the consumption of food with high sweet content. While searching for expert dentist, Anchorage clinics are often recommended for its exemplary care and assortment of dental procedures.

toothbrushpasteRegular dental checkup

To ensure overall dental health, a regular dental checkup is recommended by the dentists. It is important to consult a dentist to evaluate dental problems such as cavities, bleeding of gums, tooth misalignment and so forth. Visiting an emergency dentist is one of the best options for all types of dental health problems. Most of the clinics in the Anchorage area offer a cozy atmosphere to the patients and address their issues in a gentle manner. Various dental health care programs such as whitening of the teeth, dental implants, veneers, sedation dentistry and so forth are offered to the patients. Emergency dentistry services are also offered at most of these dental offices.

Today, various dental insurance plans are offered, which makes it easier to avail the best services at affordable prices, to ensure dental health care. Dental health care plans are also offered online at an affordable price rate. It is very important to maintain a high standard of oral health in today’s fast paced environment to ensure healthy teeth and gums.

– Dana Smith is a niche blogger; she is currently works for Anchorage Midtown Dental. Contact for right now if you have suffered an emergency dentistry treatment in Anchorage.

Global Sugar Intake Behind The Rise In Type 2 Diabetes

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diabeteswordFrom Your Health Journal…..A great article in one of my favorite web sites to promote called Red Orbit, written by Lawrence LeBlond. The article is entitled Global Sugar Intake Behind The Rise In Type 2 Diabetes. Obesity is on the rise all over the world, and one health risk factor associated with obesity is type 2 diabetes, which in many cases, is environmental – sometimes reversible with weight loss. Believe it or not, more than 350 million people around the glboe are believed to have diabetes, and for years health experts have debated on what the exact driver of the illness has been. While sugar intake has been viewed as a culprit in many eyes, scientists have long refuted that conjecture and attributed the global health crisis to too much overall food intake and obesity. Recently, a new study suggests through compelling evidence that Type 2 diabetes is being largely driven by the rising consumption of sugary foods and drinks. Please visit the Red Orbit web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

More than 350 million people worldwide are believed to have diabetes, and for years health experts have debated on what the exact driver of the illness has been. While sugar intake has been viewed as a culprit in many eyes, scientists have long refuted that conjecture and attributed the global health crisis to too much overall food intake and obesity.

But in a new finding by three California universities – Stanford, UC-Berkeley and UCSF – suggests through compelling evidence that Type 2 diabetes is being largely driven by the rising consumption of sugary foods and drinks. This evidence comes in the form of large-scale analysis of worldwide sugar availability over the last decade. The findings have been published in Wednesday’s (Feb. 27) issue of the journal PLoS ONE.

In all, the American researchers looked at sugar intake in 175 countries, including the United States. They found increases in sugar intake account for a third of all new cases of diabetes in the US and a quarter of all cases worldwide. In the countries studied, the researchers found an average 150-calorie-per-day increase in the availability of sugar – roughly the equivalent of a can of cola. This accounts for a rise in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes by 1.1 percent.

The team also found that, in the countries studied, an increase of 150-calories-per-day for all food, regardless of sugar content, only led to a 0.1 percent rise in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, adding credence to the evidence that sugar intake is a prominent driver for onset of diabetes.

PROMINENT ROLE

The study’s lead author, Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, said the finding was “quite a surprise.”

“We’re not diminishing the importance of obesity at all, but these data suggest that at a population level there are additional factors that contribute to diabetes risk besides obesity and total calorie intake, and that sugar appears to play a prominent role,” Basu said.

While the study cannot prove that sugar alone is causing diabetes, it does confirm that the longer a population is exposed to excess sugar, the higher its diabetes rate will be after taking obesity and other factors into account. The study also found that diabetes rates waned over time when sugar availability dropped, independent of changes in consumption of other calories.

To read the full article…..Click here

Are Only Children To Blame For The Obesity Crisis?

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boygirlplayvectorFrom Your Health Journal…..”A great article today in the LA Times written by Karen Kaplan entitled Are Only Children To Blame For The Obesity Crisis? Researchers from Denmark analyzed health statistics of more than 29,000 Danish schoolchildren and discovered that boys and girls without brothers or sisters were 44% more likely to be obese than kids with siblings. They also looked at the records of several hundred young men who had registered for the draft and calculated that those who were only children were 76% more likely to be obese than their counterparts with siblings. The research team also found that youngest siblings were significantly more likely to be obese. Among the schoolchildren, those who were born last were 33% more likely to be obese than other kids with siblings. These are in fact interesting findings, but not sure if they are very significant. The obesity crisis is growing out of control in some areas of the world, and change is needed to many things in the lives of children, such as reducing technology, increasing physical activity, and improving diets of children. Heart disease is still the number killer in the US, and affects many children. Please visit the LA Times web site (link provided below) to view the complete article.”

From the article…..

A new study suggests an intriguing explanation for the rise in obesity rates — the growing number of only children.

Researchers from Denmark analyzed health records of more than 29,000 Danish schoolchildren and found that boys and girls without brothers or sisters were 44% more likely to be obese than kids with siblings. They also looked at the records of several hundred young men who had registered for the draft and calculated that those who were only children were 76% more likely to be obese than their counterparts with siblings.

The results, published online Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE, are in line with other research. For instance, a study published last year in the journal Nutrition and Diabetes found a 52% increased risk of obesity among only children from throughout Europe.

Among the school kids, obesity was defined as having a BMI in the top 5% of all students when they were 13 years old. The draft registrants (who ranged in age from 18 to 26, with a median age of 19) were considered obese if their BMI was at least 31. (Most studies use a cut-off of 30, but the researchers said they didn’t think the difference changed their results.)

Why would being an only child cause someone to weigh more? Back in the 1940s, the psychoanalyst and eating disorder expert Hilde Bruch blamed ambivalent mothers who overfed their singletons.

More recently, scientists have looked to biology for explanations. One theory — known as the Developmental Origins Hypothesis — is that conditions in the womb are different for the first occupant than for subsequent occupants. But if that were the case, then first-born children with younger siblings should be just as likely to be obese as only children. But they aren’t — in the new study, first-borns were no more likely to be obese than children born later in the birth order. More research is needed, the study authors wrote.

The research team also found that youngest siblings were significantly more likely to be obese. Among the schoolchildren, those who were born last were 33% more likely to be obese than other kids with siblings. (Only children were excluded from this part of the analysis.) Among the young adults who registered for the draft, being last-born was associated with a 32% increased risk of obesity.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Is Healthy The New Skinny?

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losingweightFrom Your Health Journal…..”I found a great article from U~T San Diego written by Ursula Ridens entitled Healthy is the new skinny for 2013. We discussed here how the most common New Year’s resolution each year is losing weight, whether going on a diet, exercising more…..or both. After time, and after spending a lot of money on a diet, or time on an exercise regimen, individuals slowly get back to their regular patterns – and weight. The author of today’s article review makes such a valuable point, then possibly our New Year’s resolution should not so much be about losing weight, but about being healthy. One major problem many people have is they try to lose too much too soon. It may not be the best thing for many people, especially if they have a history of gaining weight back quickly. Rather, people should set realistic goals, and set a weight loss goal for a longer period of time, not trying to do too much too soon. For many of us with the hustle and bustle routines, stress, work, and families – this may be a better path to not only lose weight, but to also be healthy. Please visit the U~T San Diego web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It was well written and informative.”

From the article…..

Year after year, weight loss ranks as one of the top New Year’s resolutions for many people hoping to turn a new leaf and improve their self image. However, many of those resolving to shed the extra pounds by dieting end up unsuccessful – sometimes in a matter of a few weeks – and fall back to their old habits.

Young women, including teenage girls, are more likely to fixate on their weight, as they are exposed to messages and images in the media that idealize being skinny. In turn, these women develop unrealistic perceptions and expectations about body image, blurring the line between being skinny and being healthy.

As we hear more about the “obesity epidemic” in America, it’s important to understand why weight loss resolutions can often be misguided. Instead, shifting focus to overall health – not necessarily on losing weight – is a more attainable and approachable way to start the new year.

The downfall of focusing on losing a certain number of pounds or reaching a certain weight fuels the yo-yo dieting cycle and can harm your mental and physical health. It can perpetuate a cycle of weight loss and weight gain and place emphasis on external appearance rather than internal health.

Dieting implies restriction and deprivation, with pitfalls such as increased hunger, cravings and a sense of loss. This usually means only temporary change and a return to the previous eating patterns. The term diet often implies that there is a start and an end.

A non-diet approach focuses on adopting lifestyle changes that leads to long-term health improvements. Knowing these three tips are helpful in establishing a more realistic approach to making positive changes to your health:

To read the complete article…..Click here

Why Flabby Isn’t The New Healthy

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obese childFrom Your Health Journal…..”What an excellent story I just found from The Province out of Canada called Why Flabby Isn’t The New Healthy. A couple weeks ago we reported here a few stories which claimed that overweight people had a better chance of living longer. Keep in mind, they were not talking about obese people, just slightly overweight. I expressed my worry over this, as many people may interpret this as a ticket to go out and eat more, while exercise less. Today’s article challenges the study and theory that being overweight may not be a bad thing…..the author points out that verweight people and those at the lower end of the obese range have a 5% to 6% lower risk for an early death compared with people of normal weight. It also found that extremely obese people are 29% more likely than normal weight types to die prematurely. So what now? This may sound confusing to many. The bottom line, continue to take care of yourself by eating nutritiously, getting plenty of exercise, adequate sleep, and proper hydration. Don’t believe all the hype you read, and listen to your body and your doctor. There are no shortcuts to good health, and taking care of oneself takes some work. Please visit The Province web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

If the headline-grabbing news that “overweight people live longer” inspired you to skip your daily stroll or reach back into that bag of sour-cream-and-chives chips, we’ve got important info that could really extend your life: Despite some seriously nutty headlines (our favourite: “Being Overweight Is Linked to Lower Risk for Mortality” — as if they’d found the fountain of perpetual life), flab is a major-ager. And trimming yours (especially around your belly) is a life-saving health move.

Where did the news flash that some excess body fat is healthy come from? A meta-study that reviewed 97 health-and-weight studies involving 2.88 million people. Its conclusions: Overweight people and those at the lower end of the obese range have a 5 per cent to 6 per cent lower risk for an early death compared with people at a normal weight. However, extremely obese people are 29 per cent more likely than normal weight types to die prematurely.

Sounds impressive, but they excluded studies that looked at people with specific medical conditions or those undergoing specific procedures. If you were being treated for high blood pressure (67 million in the U.S.), high LDL (lousy) cholesterol (24 million) or diabetes (18.8 million), you were not included — even if your condition was a result of being overweight or obese. The only thing this group of overweight healthy people can tell us about the general risks of extra pounds is that they were somehow exempt from diseases related to being overweight and obesity.

The study also used body mass index (BMI) to evaluate each person’s fat and fit status. BMI — the comparison of weight to height — is no longer considered the best indicator of the presence, or absence, of health-harming body fat. The new standard: Belly fat (or, as we call it, omental fat, the deep abdominal fat that hangs off your stomach), not overall fatness, is the driving force behind life-changing health problems; it nearly doubles your odds for heart disease and cancer, and triples your risk for dementia. Carrying just three extra pounds of this inflammation-boosting fat can triple your diabetes risk!

To read the full article…..Click here