Strengthen Your Back With Weights

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By Laura Billings

weightsPart of strengthening your core is to strengthen your back as well. Strengthening your back is essential if you don’t want to suffer from nagging back pains. It also helps in improving your balance, stability, and posture. So if you don’t want to be slouching all the time, we suggest that you strengthen your back while you are lifting weights by following the tips below.

1. Do weight training exercises that put emphasis on strengthening your back.

If you prefer to lift weights while at the gym, there are a couple of weight training exercises that work efficiently in strengthening your back muscles. Try one of these exercises to strengthen your back muscles:

● Barbell Deadlifts: This particular exercise can help in building up your total-body strength by focusing on the lower and upper back, glutes, traps, hamstrings, and quads. The exercise can also increase your core strength and stability while also helping to build good-looking back muscles.

Step-by-step Instructions:

➔ The goal here is to lower the barbell while keeping your chest up and your back flat.

➔ Bend your hips and knees and then grab the bar with an overhand grip.

➔ Stand up without rounding your lower back. Pause for a second, and then lower the bar back to the starting position while keeping it as close to your body as much as you can.

➔ Repeat the exercise for three sets while doing 4-6 reps for each set. Also, don’t forget to rest for 2-3 minutes between each set.

● T-Bar Row: The T-bar row is an excellent exercise that involves multiple joints in your upper body. It emphasizes on strengthening your back and shoulders. The T-bar row exercise focuses on the middle of your back by putting the resistance through the center of your body.

Step-by-step Instructions:

➔ The goal here is to do the exercise by pulling the barbell to your chest while maintaining proper posture.

➔ Stand and position the one end of a barbell between your legs. Push your hips back until your back is at a 45-degree angle to the floor. Grab a V-handle and hook it to the bar and then grab it with your two hands.

➔ Pull the bar towards your chest by squeezing your shoulder blades together and driving your elbows back. Pause, and then return to the starting position.

➔ Do this exercise for three sets while doing 4-6 reps for each set, just don’t forget to take a quick 2-3 minutes break between each set.

womanweights● Dumbbell Row: Dumbbell row is an easy exercise that does an excellent job of strengthening your shoulders, biceps, and your back while keeping your core active throughout the routine. Dumbbells also allow you to achieve stability and balance on both sides of your body.

Step-by-step Instructions:

➔ Stand with both of your feet shoulder-width apart from each other and hold a dumbbell in each of your hands.

➔ Bend your knees slightly and then bend your waist while keeping your back straight. Avoid rounding your upper back and be sure to keep your head steady.

➔ Extend your hands fully, so each dumbbell is just above the floor. Contract your back and pull the dumbbells up to your ribcage.

➔ Be sure to pull through the elbow and then hold for one second at the top position before you lower the dumbbells back to the starting position.

➔ Do this exercise for three sets while doing 8-15 reps for each set.

2. Observe correct posture while lifting weights.

Remember to maintain proper posture as you are lifting weights. This could be a bit hard to do, but you should be able to do it eventually. Remember that poor posture is one of the major causes of back pain. So if you don’t observe proper posture as you lift weights, it will put more stress and pressure on to your back muscles which results in nagging back pain.

3. Learn how to lift weights correctly.

Although there are weight training exercises that focus on strengthening your back muscles, chances are that they can still injure your back while doing these, especially if you misuse the weights. You need to know how to lift weights correctly and follow the step-by-step instructions of the weight training exercises you are trying to do.

4. Remember to give your back muscles some time off.

Strength training can cause tiny tears in your muscle tissues. These tears might not be harmful, but they are crucial to making your muscles to become stronger as the tears recover. Always give your back muscles a time off and let them recover for at least 48 hours before you start doing weight training exercises again.

We hope that these tips can help you strengthen your back muscles while lifting weights. Once you follow these tips, you should be able to create strong and sexy back muscles, and you will no longer be vulnerable to back pains.

– Laura Billings is a law enthusiast and budding writer. She makes it a habit of making sure her pieces are informative enough to help even the common person understand important aspects of the rules of law. Laura likes to read books and write creative pieces during her free time.

Tip For Runners: Strengthen Your Butt!

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and John Fulton, Physical Therapist….please share your comments below…..

joggingRunners often hurt. Knees, feet, hips… Minor aches and pains and the threat of a serious, disabling injury plague runners of all ages and at all levels. “We see runners all the time who have had occasional discomfort in a knee,” says physical therapist John Fulton of Armonk Physical Therapy and Sports Training. “They take a couple of logical steps – scale back their runs, try icing, stretching, maybe new shoes – but the knee doesn’t improve and sometimes gets worse. The problem may be that the root cause of their discomfort is injury or weakness in the gluteus medius and the pain won’t be alleviated until that is corrected.”

Three gluteal muscles make up the buttocks. When walking or running, the gluteus maximus, the largest of the gluteal muscles, moves the hips and thighs. The gluteus medius, a broad muscle located on the outer surface of the pelvis, and the gluteus minimus, the smallest of the three, act as abductors, meaning they move the leg away from the body. They also stabilize the pelvis when the runner’s foot hits the ground. “There is more than one way in which the gluteus medius can cause problems for a runner,” says Mr. Fulton. “It can become inflamed causing pain in the hip or it can develop small contractures that shorten the muscle and make it less flexible, sending pain down the outside of the leg to the knee, shin and ankle.”

The gluteus medius causes further problems for the runner when it becomes weak or fatigued. “We’ve learned that some of the most common running injuries can be traced to weakness in the gluteus medius,” says Mr. Fulton. “Problems like patellofemoral pain syndrome, also known as ‘runner’s knee,’ iliotibial band syndrome, Achilles tendonitis, and lower back pain can be triggered by an inadequately functioning gluteus medius. When the gluteus medius isn’t providing proper stabilization, muscles that weren’t designed for that task pick up the slack, eventually causing discomfort that compels the runner to adjust his or her stride, leading to poor mechanics and vulnerability to a wide range of injuries.”

seniorjoggerStrengthening the gluteus medius can improve a runner’s performance and, even more important, is key to preventing injury. Mr. Fulton makes the following recommendations:

Cross train: Athletes who work the same muscles repeatedly and intensely, for example, those who limit their workouts to running, suffer more injuries than those who regularly swap a run for, say, a bike ride or a swim. Cross-training gives the muscles a chance to recover and relieves the strain of using them over and over in the same way.

Strengthen: A physical therapist or professional trainer can assess the state of your gluteus medius and suggest a strengthening regimen that takes into account your individual circumstances. Exercises that may be used include squats, particularly single-leg squats, lunges, side-lying hip abduction, single-leg dead lifts, and the clam shell.

Take it easy: A program to strengthen a weak muscle or muscle group should be undertaken gradually to avoid injury.

“We find that many injuries to the pelvis and lower limbs can be treated by strengthening the gluteus medius,” says Mr. Fulton. “And doing so will not only help prevent further injuries, improved pelvic stabilization will enable proper gait and improve performance. Strengthening the butt is one of the most important things a runner can do.”

– John Fulton, PT, takes great pride in restoring athletes to optimum physical condition and getting them back in the game as soon as possible. Armonk Physical Therapy and Sports Training provides personalized, integrative, and skilled one-on-one physical therapy services. http://www.armonkptst.com

Everlast Climbing Lobbies To Strengthen Physical Education

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jumpingsacsOver 300 advocates participated in the second annual Minnesotans for Healthy Kids Coalition Lobby Day to lobby for stronger physical education and Safe Routes to School funding. Everlast Climbing was especially interested in voicing support for the 2016 PE Bill SF343/HF498 which would strengthen physical education programs by adopting new standards and grade-specific benchmarks to strengthen physical education in schools. Currently, physical educators are using outdated standards from 2004. Updating the standards and benchmarks will give Minnesota schools better information to design, execute and evaluate their local curriculum.

In attendance from Everlast Climbing was Mertyce Mrvos, Coordinator of Programs and Partnerships. She met with State Representative Ron Erhardt, Senator Melisa Franzen and her Legislative Assistant, Thomas Melton. “Children who receive regular, quality physical education are 2 ½ times more likely to be active adults. They also learn more effectively and achieve more academically,” said Mrvos. “I was thrilled to see that legislators are in favor of strengthening physical education with this bill.”

Childhood obesity is a major health concern for Minnesota, with nearly 1 in 4 of its high school students being overweight or obese. Obesity is linked to 14 types of cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Physical activity improves health and reduces risk of these chronic diseases. Quality physical education in schools is one way to increase physical activity levels in youth. It also promotes enjoyable participation in physical activity and helps youth develop the knowledge, attitudes, motor and behavioral skills and confidence needed to improve physical fitness and adopt and maintain a physically active lifestyle throughout their lifetime.

“Advocating for physical education and youth fitness is part of our company’s mission,” said Tim Sudeith, General Manager of Everlast Climbing. “We regularly communicate the importance of physical education and are eager to play a part in strengthening physical education in our state.”

About Everlast Climbing

Everlast Climbing is committed to improving youth fitness with dynamic and innovative products that engage children and inspire physical activity. The company is headquartered in Mendota Heights, MN, and is a PlayCore company. More information is available about Everlast Climbing at: everlastclimbing.com.

Everlast Climbing Advocates To Strengthen Physical Education

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

groupkidswbgEverlast Climbing participated in the Minnesotans for Healthy Kids Coalition Lobby Day to voice to legislators the importance of physical education in the state’s fight against childhood obesity.

Approximately 300 advocates participated in the first annual Minnesotans for Healthy Kids Coalition Lobby Day to lobby for physical education, active transportation and the Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP). Everlast Climbing was especially interested in voicing support for the 2015 PE Bill SF343/HF498 which would strengthen physical education programs by adopting new grade-specific benchmarks, require annual student assessments and other measures to strengthen physical education in schools.

In attendance from Everlast Climbing was Mertyce Mrvos, Coordinator of Programs and Partnerships. She met with State Representative Rick Hansen, State Representative Joe Atkins and State Senator James Metzen. “Physical education plays a key role in the health and wellbeing of children,” said Mrvos. “In our meetings, it was clear that the legislators understood this. They were very supportive of legislation to strengthen physical education.”

Results from the most recent National Survey of Children’s Health reveal that 27% of Minnesota children ages 10-17 are overweight or obese. It is no surprise that Minnesota children are falling short of the CDC-recommended 60 minutes of daily physical activity. According to the latest Minnesota Student Survey, less than half of students report having had 60 minutes of physical activity in five or more days of the last week. Quality physical education in schools is one way to increase physical activity levels in youth. It also promotes enjoyable participation in physical activity and helps students develop the knowledge, attitudes, motor and behavioral skills, and confidence needed to improve physical fitness and adopt and maintain a physically active lifestyle throughout their lifetime.

“Advocating for youth fitness is very important to our company. It’s especially rewarding to participate in an event like this that will benefit the youth in our state,” said Tim Sudeith, General Manager of Everlast Climbing.