Don’t Let Sleep Apnea Take Your Breath Away

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This article is courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your thoughts below…..

sleepThere are some moments in life that take your breath away, but if those moments are happening while you’re asleep, it might be time to see a sleep expert, according to a sleep specialist at Baylor College of Medicine.

“Sleep apnea is caused by a narrowing or complete collapse of the upper airway that occurs in some people while they are sleeping, and this can affect one’s ability to get oxygen to the body, making the body work harder to breathe,” said Dr. Fidaa Shaib, associate professor of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at Baylor and director of the Baylor Sleep Center. “This results in a brief arousal period, sometimes just three seconds, where the brain wakes up and the airway opens to restore breathing. For those with sleep apnea, this will happen several times throughout the night.”

Many people with sleep apnea are not aware of the number of times they are waking up briefly throughout the night. However, this sleep disruption causes them not to feel refreshed or rested when they wake up in the morning.

“It’s almost as if someone is waking you up every 10 seconds to breathe and then you go back to sleep,” said Shaib.

Symptoms

Sleep apnea is associated with multiple health issues including heart problems, high blood pressure, risk for stroke, poor diabetes control and weight gain. Common symptoms include snoring, stopping breathing and choking or gasping for air that is reported by the bed partner. Other common symptoms are not feeling refreshed in the morning or feeling tired throughout the day. Other signs that could indicate sleep apnea include restless sleep, waking up multiple times to use the bathroom, excessive sweating at night and heartburn or reflux.

“It’s important to note that women with sleep apnea may show symptoms of snoring and difficulty going to sleep or staying asleep,” said Shaib. “Their presentation is different from men, whose symptoms are usually snoring and feeling tired throughout the day.”

Risk factors and diagnosis

Risk factors of sleep apnea are obesity and anatomy, meaning that one’s facial structure may cause them to be at more risk for sleep apnea. People with nasal congestion, allergies or who are on pain medications or sleeping pills may be at a higher risk for sleep apnea.

A diagnosis of sleep apnea is made through a sleep study. Most patients will have to stay overnight at a sleep center where they are monitored for brain activity, breathing, oxygen levels, heart activity and movement. The sleep study gives a summary of a person’s sleep and experts identify those periods where there is narrowing of airways and oxygen levels are low. Some patients may also qualify for an at-home sleep test if most of their symptoms point toward sleep apnea and no other sleep issue.

Treatment

Once a diagnosis is made, the CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine remains the best treatment for sleep apnea. The machine works by gently blowing air into the windpipe to keep the airway open.

“The technology for CPAP machines has advanced and the treatment is usually very well tolerated in patients,” said Shaib.

After starting the use of the CPAP machine, which must be used every night, people usually have improved sleep quality, feel more refreshed in the morning and have better daytime function as well as better memory during the day. Patients also see benefits in blood pressure control and a lower risk of heart problems.

If patients do not tolerate the CPAP machine, other treatment options can include a custom made oral appliance or surgery.

Weight loss, behavioral modifications and treating allergies usually also helps treatment of sleep apnea.

“Some patients only have sleep apnea when they sleep on their backs, so another treatment option is to use maneuvers and techniques to help the patient stay off their back,” said Shaib.

Shaib notes that young children (3-6 years) are at risk for sleep apnea, especially when they have big tonsils and big adenoids. Older children and adolescents who are overweight or obese are also at risk. Symptoms in children include loud snoring and sleeping with their mouth open. However, rather than feeling tired during the day, children with sleep apnea are usually hyperactive during the day and can have difficulty in school. Bed wetting also can indicate the potential for sleep apnea. It’s important to consult with a pediatric sleep expert if these signs are seen in children.

There is a spectrum of response from treatment of sleep apnea, Shaib said. Some people say that using the CPAP machine is life changing, making them feel refreshed throughout the day. Others may not feel as dramatic of an effect, but are still benefitting from the decreased health impacts, such as high blood pressure or risk for heart problems.

Simple Stop Snoring Devices When You Just Want To Sleep

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By Nathan Gomez

sleepSnoring is a huge problem when your trying to get a really good night’s sleep and there are many simple stop snoring devices on the market that can quickly stop the problem in its tracks before you drive your partner crazy. You don’t’ want to be the reason your sweetheart cannot sleep, especially if you are starting to be a chronic snorer. Be sure to have a few of these solutions around that house if you know you are prone to snoring when you get a cold, drink one too many beers, or are having sinus irritation due to allergy season. Sometimes people simply snore because they are extremely tired and this level of exhaustion tends to result in a restless and noisy night.

Nasal strips are available in a few different sizes and strengths to make sure you are as comfortable as possible. Use only the strength that is necessary for your particular type of snoring. Three different strengths for those who snore just a little to those that can take down a building or compete with a classic automobile engine.

Other stop snoring devices are designed around the concept of acupressure and can be worn on the hand. The pressure is intended to assist your body to be more aware of the airway and to keep you from snoring. Acupressure has been used for centuries with exceptional results that often surprise those who are not educated in Eastern medicinal ideas.

Another option is based on vibrations which wake you just slightly if you roll onto your back. This keeps you sleeping in positions that are less likely to result in snoring. The subtle vibrations are much more comfortable than your bedmate pushing, punching, kicking, or otherwise rudely waking you up when you wake them up.

Snoring is a much bigger problem than it immediately seems and when it is chronic it can cause extreme relationship stress. You want to keep yourself as healthy as possible and these stop snoring devices are the cheapest and most simple ways to stop the problem early in its tracks. If you have a severe health condition that is resulting in the snoring, you will want to go and have a conversation with a doctor to find ways to heal the underlying issues.

Snoring once in a while isn’t really a big deal, but snoring every night could be a sign of much more significant issues. Save your sleep, and the sleep of your loved ones by having a few of these items in your medicine cabinet so you are prepared when you need them. The financial output isn’t much and you will definitely be glad when you can get a good rest, stop waking yourself up, and stop waking everyone else up as well. You will feel happier and healthier if you sleep soundly. Snoring isn’t really major until and unless it is something that sticks around and doesn’t go away when the cold, allergies or other environmental trigger is gone.

Sleep And Proper Nutrition Are Essential For Final Exam Success

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This article was submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine, please leave your comments below…..

sleepBefore the summer fun can begin, many students need to make it through the dreaded final exam period. According to experts at Baylor College of Medicine, putting the books and notes to the side for proper sleep and nutrition can be just as important as studying.

Studies have shown that sleep affects memory and learning and that a lack of sleep has a negative impact on things associated with learning, such as school performance in children. For teens and adolescents who persistently study late into the night and pull all-nighters to cram for an exam, it may be better to put the books down and hit the sack for a few hours to cement the knowledge into their brain, according to Dr. Philip Alapat, assistant professor of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine and program director of the Baylor College of Medicine Sleep Medicine Fellowship.

So how much sleep, on average, should you be getting? The National Sleep Foundation released these recommendations in 2015:

Newborn (0-3 months): 14-17 hours

Infant (4-11 months): 12-15 hours

Toddler (1-2 years): 11-14 hours

Preschooler (3-5 years): 10-13 hours

School-aged child (6-13 years): 9-11 hours

Teen (14-17 years): 8 -10 hours

Young adult (18-25 years): 7-9 hours

Adult (26-64 years): 7-9 hours

Older adult (65+ years): 7-8 hours

Your diet also may be important for optimal academic performance.

“Your brain needs high-quality food,” said Roberta Anding, a registered dietitian with Baylor.

Make sure to have a source of protein with each meal as proteins help the timely release of carbohydrates in the body. Breakfasts should include a quality carbohydrate such as oatmeal or shredded wheat, combined with a protein such as eggs, yogurt or Canadian bacon. Another breakfast combination could include scrambled eggs, oatmeal and half of a grapefruit.

“Don’t forget that you need carbohydrates to fuel your brain, so don’t skip breakfast,” she said.

Anding suggests avoiding sugary snacks before exams – sugar on an empty stomach can cause a rapid rise and fall in blood sugar and make focus and concentration more difficult.

Also be sure to hydrate.

“We often lose our cue to drink when it’s cool outside, but making sure you are hydrated with water can improve your sense of well-being,” said Anding.

Study Shows That Teens Lose Sleep After Change To Daylight Saving Time

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, please share your comments below…..

SleepingWomanA new study shows that high school students lose sleep on school nights following the change to daylight saving time that occurs in March. The loss of sleep during the school week was associated with a decline in vigilance and cognitive function, which raises safety concerns for teen drivers.

Results show that the average objectively measured sleep duration on the weeknights after the spring time change declined to 7 hours, 19 minutes, which reflects a mean loss of 32 minutes per night compared with the school week prior to the implementation of daylight saving time. Average cumulative sleep loss on weeknights following the time change was 2 hours, 42 minutes. During school days after the time change, students also displayed increased sleepiness and a decline in psychomotor vigilance, including longer reaction times and increased lapses of attention.

“For many years now, sleep researchers have been concerned about sleep deprivation in adolescents,” said principal investigator Dr. Ana Krieger, medical director of the Weill Cornell Center for Sleep Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and associate professor of clinical medicine, of medicine in clinical neurology, and of clinical genetic medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. “This study unveils a potential additional factor that may further restrict their sleep in the early spring.”

Study results are published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

According to the authors, this is the first study to quantify the detrimental effects of daylight saving time implementation using objective measurements of sleep duration and vigilance in students attending high school.

The study group comprised 35 high school students with a mean age of 16.5 years. Nightly sleep duration was measured at home by actigraphy during the weeks prior to and after the change to daylight saving time. Participants also completed a sleep diary to report subjective sleep measures. Measurements of daytime sleepiness and vigilance were collected using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT).

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that adolescents get a little more than nine hours of nightly sleep for optimal health and daytime alertness during the critical transition from childhood to adulthood.

“Getting adequate sleep is key for many facets of an adolescent’s development,” said Dr. Nathaniel F. Watson, president of the AASM. “This study raises significant concern about the consequences of impeding their already hectic sleep schedules with Daylight Saving Time every spring.”

To request a copy of the study, “Adverse Effects of Daylight Saving Time on Adolescents’
Sleep and Vigilance,” or to arrange an interview with the study author or an AASM spokesperson, please contact Communications Coordinator Lynn Celmer at 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, or lcelmer(at)aasmnet(dot)org.

The monthly, peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine is the official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a professional membership society that improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards (http://www.aasmnet.org). The AASM encourages patients to talk to their doctor about sleep problems or visit http://www.sleepeducation.org for a searchable directory of AASM-accredited sleep centers.

Stop Restless Legs Syndrome From Stealing Sleep

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

SleepingWomanRestless legs syndrome (RLS) involves uncomfortable sensations in the legs at night and an irresistible urge to move them, which can disturb sleep.

People with restless legs syndrome (RLS) describe it as a tingling, aching, pulling, itching, cramping, or “creepy-crawly” feeling in the legs. No matter how it feels, restless legs syndrome can dramatically interfere with sleep, reports the May 2015 Harvard Men’s Health Watch.

“People come in describing insomnia, but they don’t put two and two together,” says Dr. John Winkelman, an RLS specialist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. “You have to make that connection and then address the restless legs, and that helps people sleep better.”

The sensations caused by RLS feel like they come from deep in the legs. They trigger an irresistible urge to move the legs. The symptoms typically start or get worse at night, and often disrupt sleep.

For men with infrequent or moderately bothersome symptoms, self-help efforts can reduce the symptoms of RLS and improve sleep. Dr. Winkelman suggests these strategies to his patients:

* Don’t drink caffeinated or alcoholic beverages, especially within several hours of bedtime.

* Don’t smoke or use other nicotine-based products.

* Before going to bed, massage the leg muscles, do gentle stretches, take a warm bath, or apply heating pads.

* Exercise every day, but not too close to bedtime.

* Schedule activities that require prolonged sitting or reclining in the morning rather than the afternoon.

If these don’t help, five FDA-approved medications are available for people with severe and frequent symptoms of RLS.

Read the full-length article: “When sleeplessness starts in the legs”

Also in the May 2015 Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

* Easing osteoarthritis without adding pills

* Soy and men’s health

* Smartphone apps for men’s health

* Probiotics for the colon

The Harvard Men’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Want To Sleep Better In 2015?

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Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article…..please share your thoughts in the comments section below…..

malesmileOral health goes far beyond tooth decay and a sparkling smile. Within the last decade, the medical field has taken on a more holistic approach to the connection between oral health and links to a variety of conditions affecting the body at large. Dr. Jerry Cheung, of Bright Smile Dental, advises that dentists can be the first line of defense when it comes to assisting in prevention and early detection of serious, life-threatening conditions affecting the entire body; sleep apnea, a condition affecting 22 million Americans, is one that can be identified through a routine dental exam.

Dr. Cheung comments, “I have long held the belief that as a dentist, I have unique insight into larger issues impacting patients. Teeth don’t walk through the door on their own. There is a whole person attached and it is my job to counsel that person for better overall health and well-being.”

Specifically, he adds, “Bruxism, or teeth grinding, is a major complaint among many patients who come to see me. Generally, dentists will attribute this to stress or issues with a bite, however, I have found that some of my patients have actually suffered from sleep apnea. In some cases, the grinding or gnashing of the teeth is actually caused by obstructed airways during sleep. This, of course is a serious health issue, and we have been able to work through this through further referrals to specialists, and in some cases, a simple dental appliance.”

With so many Americans suffering from sleep apnea, it is even more astounding that so many go undiagnosed. Identifying the issue can literally save lives as sleep apnea can cause the arteries to harden leading to serious heart issues, memory loss, and concentration issues. In most cases, those suffering with sleep apnea or restricted airways, wake up to breathe throughout the night. This causes unrest and can severely impact a patient’s quality of life.

“I think it is most important that we, in the dental field, educate our patients on how far reaching a good oral health routine can be when it comes to overall health. We need to ask the right questions and look for cues that our patients may not think of when coming in to get a routine exam.”

Dr. Cheung suggest that patients prepare for routine dental exams by providing a list of other health issues to cover with their dentist. In some cases, a dentist can examine the mouth, but also make further connections to other health issues so that the patient can work more effectively with outside specialists and their primary care physicians. In many cases, the issues can be resolved through treatments prescribed directly by the dentist.

For more information or to schedule an exam, visit http://www.brightsmilepowell.com/ or call 614.706.1836.

The Link Between Sleep And Obesity

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By Doug Johnson

SleepingWomanHow many hours of sleep are you getting at night? If you’re like the average American, your answer is most likely: not much. Unfortunately, a lack of sleep has been linked to a whole host of problems, but more recently it’s been linked to obesity.

It makes sense, right? You sleep less, therefore you’re more sluggish, less motived to exercise and more tempted to snack throughout the day. Yes, that’s the underlying link between sleep (or lack thereof) and obesity, but there’s much more to it than that.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 70% of Americans are overweight, and at least 35% are considered obese. One of the main problems with weight gain/loss is that it’s hard to stabilize your diet and routines when, as a culture, we’re always on the go. Pulling an all-nighter, waking up when it’s still dark out and going to bed in the wee hours of the night are all things we do on a weekly basis, and it’s having a dramatic effect on our metabolisms. Unfortunately, this trend of get-up-and-go isn’t getting better, it’s getting worse. It’s now estimated that one in three children who were born in the year 2000 will develop diabetes.

You’re Hungrier When You’re Sleepy

A lack of sleep can actually make you hungrier. When your sleep cycle is disrupted, your hormones become imbalanced, and the hormone that controls your appetite, leptin, can become disrupted.

This is one of the main reasons why restrictive-type diets have such a high failure rate. People may initially see promising results, but their bodies are too inclined to living a certain lifestyle, and are actually pressuring the person to eat more—even going so far as altering how much energy they exert in order to make them crave more food. This may seem hard to believe, but it’s true.

Leptin is the hormone that regulates how much fat your body stores. It’s the hormone that determines whether you’re hungry, whether you’re full and how much energy your body expends throughout the day. One of the biggest risks of sleep deficiency is that you become more susceptible to a leptin deficiency which, you guessed it, leads to weight gain.

Other Effects of Less Sleep

stresssleepingOne of the most common themes we’ve seen in patients is that most aren’t sleeping enough. Sleep deprivation can alter your blood sugar levels. It can also throw off your body’s natural body heat, making you either feel warmer, colder or both. Worse still, it can aggravate your back.

Muscles that are fatigued have a harder time supporting your spine, making you more likely to slouch. When you slouch you put more pressure on your spine, which in turn puts more pressure on your spine’s discs and joints. It’s a viscous cycle: back pain can lead to a lack of sleep, but a lack of sleep can also lead to back pain.

How to Curb Your Appetite

Fortunately, the effects of sleep deprivation aren’t permanent. Experts say you need about 7.5 hours of sleep a night to be awake actively throughout the day. Unfortunately, The Better Sleep Council reports 48% of Americans aren’t getting enough sleep. That said, everyone’s body is different and the amount of sleep really isn’t as important as the quality of sleep you’re getting. If you’re having trouble sleeping at night, start by taking a look at your activities throughout the day.

• Are you a coffee or tea drinker? If so, how often and when do you drink? Experts say you should limit your caffeine intake to before 2 pm—anything after could make it harder to fall asleep.

• How often do you exercise? One of the easiest ways to help you fall asleep at night is to be active enough for your body to want to rest. Sleep deprivation may cause you to be awake longer, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re more active. Quite the opposite, actually. So you’re up longer, eating more, and probably exercising less.

• Are you constantly on the computer before bedtime? If so, you may want to limit how long you’re online before bed. This CNN report mentions how the artificial lights on computer screens and iPads can make it harder to fall asleep.

• How cold is your bedroom? When your body is at a cooler temperature, it’s easier to fall asleep. Anyone who lives in the South can attest to this, as I’ve spent many sweltering summer nights tossing and turning.

By limiting how much caffeine you’re drinking throughout the day and exercising more, you’ll help make it easier to fall asleep at night. In addition, work toward making your nightly routine more conducive to sleep by turning off all electronics an hour before bed and turning the heat down a little. Remember, a little more sleep goes a long way in improving your health, and helping to avoid issues like obesity and back pain.

– Author Doug Johnson helped create North American Spine and manages all medical staff, in addition to training physicians in proper AccuraScope® procedure techniques.

Fact Or Myth: Sleep Apnea Linked To Low Testosterone Levels In Men?

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By Dr. Michael Layton (DDS)

mansmileIs there a link between sleep apnea and low testosterone levels in men? Health.com recently posted the connection between the two in their 13 Surprising Facts About Testosterone. How valid is this? Let’s examine the facts and nothing but the facts to determine the implications of sleep apnea on testosterone.

What Is Sleep Apnea?

Lawrence Epstein, M.D. of Harvard Medical School and the editor of Harvard Health Publications special health report defines sleep apnea as “a collapse of the upper airway during sleep that is due to the size of the airway and the changes that happen when you fall asleep. The airway is a flexible tube where air passes through the mouth or nose. When you fall asleep the tissue surrounding the breathing tube narrows a little bit. When it closes halfway thats when you start to get an obstruction to airflow which causes very turbulent airflow, resulting in the tissues to vibrate and thats snoring. When the airway completely closes off thats apnea.”

The closing off the airway triggers the brain of the individual to wake up, sleep apnea sufferers can have their sleep interrupted from 25 to 50 times per hour. Sleep apnea is chronic condition affecting 858,900 Canadians who are 18 years and older. Statistics for people who suffer from this sleep disorder reported being diagnosed with the more serious obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This more severe form affects 26 percent of Canadians or 1 in four adults. These statistics can be found at the Public Health Agency of Canada from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey provisioned through Stats Canada.

Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

mansleepingatdeskSleep apnea is more common in males than in females.

Symptoms are as follows:

● interruption of sleep

● shortness of breath

● loud snoring

● waking up with a dry or sore throat

● headaches

● constant reawakening

● decreased interest in sex

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs commonly in people who suffer from obesity, diabetes, heart attacks and strokes, if left untreated it will only exacerbate these preconditions. Extreme fatigue that results from waking up multiple times in a night leads to depression, driving accidents and workplace hazards. When your mother told you to go to bed early when you were a child she may have known a thing or 2 unbeknownst to her about natural health. A good night’s sleep can not be underestimated for your overall health.

What Is Testosterone?

Testosterone is produced in the testes it is the secondary sex characteristic responsible for the reproductive development of the male gender. This male sex hormone is commonly associated with sexual desire and the production of sperm. The three main types of testosterone classification are as follows:

1. Free Testosterone. Total testosterone the purest form found in the human body with no proteins attached to it. This testosterone makes up 2 to 3 percent of total testosterone levels in the human body. Free testosterone is really important for bodybuilders and athletes in sports.

2. SHBG-bound Testosterone. SHBG is bound with the sex hormone globulin. It can not be used to build muscles or change a persons mood. SHBG makes up 40 to 50 percent of our total testosterone levels.

3. Albumin bound Testosterone. Albumin is a protein found in the liver that helps stabilize extracellular fluid in the body. Just like SHBG Albumin is biologically inactive.

Testosterone governs the following factors:

● Skin-Hair growth, balding, sebum production

● Brain-Libido, mood

● Liver-Synthesis of serum proteins

● Male Sexual Growth-penile growth, spermatogenesis, prostate growth and function

● Muscle development-increase in strength and size

● Kidney-stimulation of erythropoietin production

● Bone marrow- stimulation of stem cells

● Bone-accelerated linear growth

manphoneTestosterone affects your level of focus, bone density and last but not least the size of your muscles. Most people associate testosterone with bodybuilders and aggression in athletes especially football players, boxers and MMA fighters. Most of the testosterone in the human body gets bound by the sex hormone binding agent globulin that grabs the testerone preventing its over release, there is another protein amylin also grabs the testerone for when its slowly needed as required. The globulin protein increases as men age leading to decreased levels of testosterone.

Symptoms of Low Testosterone

● erectile disfunction

● lack of sex drive

● lack of focus and ambition

● obesity

● decreased muscle mass

● bone density decrease

● abnormal male breast tissue

● low sperm count

● loss of body hair

● mild anemia

● decreased energy and depression

Low levels of testosterone in men can lead to an increased risk of chronic conditions like diabetes or hypertension or even death in some cases.

Linking Sleep Apnea and Low Testosterone

doctorAny physician out there will acknowledge there is a direct link between aging and a decrease in testosterone levels and higher incidences of sleep apnea. Testosterone deficiency or hypogonadism is prevalent among obese people. If noticed during this article there are many common symptoms related to men who have low levels of testosterone and people who have sleep apnea. All evidence points to a definite correlation for men who have sleep apnea and decreased levels of the male hormone testosterone.

Medical doctors recommend getting blood work done if your energy levels are low or getting a polysomnogram for possible sleep apnea. Low levels of testosterone are linked to low levels of insulin production making people susceptible to Type II Diabetes. Obesity is a common denominator in people who have diabetes. Individuals who are diabetic are at an increased risk for sleep apnea. Medical studies have drawn too many parallels between sleep apnea and low testosterone levels in men for this issue to be ignored.

If you are a male who is experiencing any of the symptoms outlined you many want to consult with your physician on your next checkup.

– Dr. Michael Layton (DDS) is a South Surrey Dentist, based in British Columbia. He has been in the dental industry for the last decade and received his Doctor of Dental Surgery from the University of Washington. He takes pride in providing a positive and caring dental solutions for people of every walk of life. You can follow him on Google+.

Tough Love Tips For Better Back To School Sleep

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By Robert S. Rosenberg

SleepingWomanNear the end of summer we all have a hard time adjusting back to our regular sleep schedule – especially our kids! Here are 9 tips to help get your kids to adjust from their summer sleep schedule to their back-to-school sleep schedule:

* Gradually get back into the school sleep-wake schedule 2 weeks before school

* Maintain that schedule – even on weekends!

* Establish a relaxing bedtime routine

* Avoid vigorous physical activities after dinner

* Avoid video games, television and other electronics within 2 hours of sleep

* Avoid large meals close to bedtime

* Avoid all caffeine-containing foods and drinks within 6 hours of bedtime

* A dark room + comfortable temperatures = better sleep environment

* Be a role model- Establish your own sleep-wake schedule and STICK TO IT!

– Robert S. Rosenberg, DO, FCCP has over 20 years of experience in the field of sleep medicine. Board certified in sleep medicine, pulmonary medicine, and internal medicine, Dr. Rosenberg serves as the Medical Director of the Sleep Disorders Center of Prescott Valley, Arizona and sleep medicine consultant for Mountain Heart Health Services in Flagstaff, Arizona. He is a contributing sleep expert blogger at EverydayHealth.com and his advice has appeared in O, The Oprah Magazine, Prevention, Women’s Health, Woman’s World, Parenting, and Ladies’ Home Journal, among others. Dr Rosenberg is the author of Sleep Soundly Every Night; Feel Fantastic Every Day (Demos Health). He appears regularly on television and radio and lectures throughout the country on Sleep Medicine. Learn more about Dr. Rosenberg by visiting AnswersForSleep.com.

Advantages Of Sleep, Good Nutrition, And Exercise In Everyday Life

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By Flora G. Aleana

cutekidsIndeed, sleep, nutritious food and plenty of exercises done first thing in morning, does wonders for the child’s mental and physical health and significantly wards off diseases and conditions. Besides, these are important factors for child growth and development and a lot that children carry well into adolescence; adulthood and senility have to do with how they slept, what they ate and how well they exercised during their formative years.

In everyday life of children, sleep has the following advantages:

1. It refreshes the mind and body and makes the child fresh, invigorated and stimulated for another day of activity

2. It offers daily well being and aids in physical and intellectual development

3. It allows children to remain alert and attentive in class and remain focused on studies

4. Sleep also aids in social connectivity in that well sleeping children are socially more responsive and make friends easily and well. They are also good communicators

5. Finally, good sleep and falling asleep and waking up with fixed timings does aid and abet physical, mental and social development and children who get good sleep are more healthier, active and forward looking than those who have sleep deficits.

Coming next to good nutrition, it is important for health because of the following reasons:

1. Good and nutritious food are important needs for physical growth and development of children of all age groups

2. Lack of good nutrition could cause illnesses to children who need good food for good health, sustenance and advancement

3. A solid balanced diet filled with vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydrates and lots of fresh fruits, vegetables and salads. Transfat needs to be substituted with unsaturated fats and there is need to limit or stay off sugary drinks, junk food, colas and obesity-causing foods

fruitsalad4. Good nutrition is capable of building strong, robust and active children who do well in academics as well as in the playground. They fall ill less frequently and can give 100% to what they do – and enjoy it immensely too.

5. Since children are what they eat, it is important that they be provided the best possible nutrition in food so that they could grow on to become healthier, purposeful and strong adults, fully capable of meeting societal needs and community demands.

Finally, exercises are very important for children, especially growing ones:

1. For one thing, regular exercises ensures quick development of bones and muscles and makes their heart and other organs supple and strong

2. It wards off diseases and conditions of the heart, lungs, fatty deposits in liver and elsewhere and keeps them in perfect health for long, long time

3. Child Obesity, one of the major scourges of 21st century living could be controlled and remedied with regular, timely and vigorous exercises

4. Exercises helps in the correct and effective assimilation of food and aids positive metabolism and good body formation in growing children

Indeed an exhilarating combination of excellent sleep, choice of nutritious food and plenty of indoor/outdoor exercises does promise a long, healthy and disease-free life for children and also promotes academic, cultural, social and personal wellbeing for all indulgers.

– I am Flora G. Aleana, doing my profession as a writing expert in an online essay writing company for the last few years. My skills and expertise have indeed given a hand for me to create educational projects such as applications to use before students examinations to increase their marks.