Can One Sunburn Cause Permanent Skin Damage?

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

sunOn August 13, 2015, Harper’s Bazaar Magazine posted “It Only Took One Sunburn to Ruin My Face Forever,” one woman’s account of how a common sunburn turned into an ongoing skin battle. The woman received a mild sunburn and tried her own skin regimen to facilitate the healing process. However, her burn persisted and left her face with brown patches along her cheeks and forehead. Several dermatologists were consulted and provided their own diagnoses, suggesting she had melasma or a possible hormonal imbalance caused by estrogen. She was offered several treatments, including skin peels, chemical exfoliation, and a laser procedure that targeted the millions of microscopic areas of the skin that were damaged with the goal of encouraging a comprehensive replacement of damaged cells. [see: goo.gl/Xw23id]

“For many years we’ve treated sun damaged skin at our clinic,” says Dr. Simon Ourian, Medical Director of Epione Beverly Hills. “I am glad to see that the idea of a ‘healthy tan’ has lost considerable popularity. I believe it’s important for parents to be very conscientious about protecting their children’s skin, not just for the obvious reason of preventing a sunburn but to instill the notion that sun protection is vital. Hopefully this practice will then be carried into adulthood.”

The Harper Bazaar Magazine’s article urges people to ensure proper skin care practices. While the unfortunate woman in the story will have to continue a long, slow, and steady skin regimen, the article uses her experiences to urge people to practice proper and preventative skin care regimens that will have positive long term impact. Specifically, readers are advised to apply and re-apply sunscreen daily, all year around, regardless of the weather.

“Sun damage typically accumulates over time,” says Dr. Ourian. “We offer several treatment modalities to address the effects of sun damage. This damage may include discoloration, as well as fine lines and wrinkles.”

Dr. Ourian has been a pioneer in laser technology and non-invasive aesthetic procedures including UltraShape, VelaShape, Restylane, Juvéderm, Radiesse, Sculptra, and CoolSculpting. These treatments are used for the correction or reversal of a variety of conditions such as acne, acne scars, skin discoloration, wrinkles, unwanted fat, stretch marks, varicose veins, cellulite, and others. More information about treating sun damage can be found on Epione’s website.

4 Ways Green Tea Can Be Beneficial To the Health Of Your Skin

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By Steven Walker

teaGreen tea might be one of the healthiest things we can consume, based on everything from ancient remedies to current medical research. Green tea has a number of healing properties, and also agents that some scientists believe may be able to prevent or even combat cancer.

Green tea also happens to be good for the waistline and is used by many people as a way to help them lose weight.

It’s not just good for your internal health, however. Green tea can also be incredibly beneficial to the health of your skin.

Below are four ways this particular type of tea can be excellent to solve common issues related to the health of your skin:

Soothing Sunburns

Getting too much sun is one of the worst overall things many of us can do for our health. Over-exposure to the sun can lead to tissue damage and even deadly forms of skin cancer. If you do accidentally get too much sun, using green tea on the affected areas can sooth inflammation and may even be helpful to alleviate some of the cell damage. It’s easy to use green tea for sunburns, just by using the bags themselves as a cool compress.

Psoriasis Help

Some research has been done in the laboratory showing green tea can slow the production of skin cells, which can lead to more optimal regulation of the life cycle of skin’s cells. This shows promise in helping people with issues such as dandruff and even psoriasis, which is otherwise difficult to manage. Even in a general sense, green tea is soothing, which can help alleviate the discomfort that comes with many common skin conditions, including psoriasis.

Foot Care

The skin on our feet can often take a beating throughout the day whether it’s from our jobs, or from being physically active. When the skin of your feet experiences issues, such as calluses, it’s not only a discomfort, but it can also lead to poor form when exercising, which can contribute to more severe injuries. To help soothe sore feet and also soften the skin before removing calluses, it can be beneficial to soak them in a green tea bath. The benefits of a green tea bath are perfect for not only feet but the skin all over our entire body, which goes along with the research showing the positive effect of green tea on skin cancer and damage from free radicals.

Acne

Green tea, as mentioned above, is useful for reducing inflammation, which is one of the primary contributors to acne on the skin. It makes an excellent simple, inexpensive and natural remedy for acne and other skin blemishes, as well as rapid aging when it’s used topically as well as when it’s brewed and consumed. In addition to acne present on the face, green tea may be beneficial for acne found other common areas, such as the back and chest, and it can also help reduce or eliminate blocked pores and excessive oils on the skin.

Green tea is considered by many in both the health and beauty industries to be one of the most potent substances available. It’s beneficial in so many ways for health in a holistic sense, but it has specific abilities to help the health of the skin as well.

Skin Can Reflect Eating Habits

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saladplateA healthy diet does a body good inside and out, and dermatologists at Baylor College of Medicine say there is evidence that links certain foods to flares in acne.

“While there are definitely a number of triggers for acne, the connection between diet and acne is very interesting,” said Dr. Rajani Katta, professor of dermatology at Baylor. “Years back dermatologists thought the two were not linked, but now researchers say there is evidence for a link between sugar and carbohydrates and acne.”

Studies have shown that foods with a high glycemic index can affect breakouts.

“Foods high on the glycemic index, meaning foods high in refined carbohydrates such as sugar, cause fluctuations in blood glucose levels,” said Dr. Ramsey Markus, associate professor of dermatology at Baylor. ”As a result of the high blood sugar levels there is a cascade of hormones released that eventually stimulate the oil gland, leading to worsening of acne”.

High glycemic index foods include:

* White rice

* White bread

* White potatoes

One study placed participants on a low glycemic index diet for 12 weeks and during this time their acne did improve significantly, Katta said.

Other foods and factors can also aggravate acne.

“Dairy products, especially low fat milk, have been linked to acne,” Markus said. “Stress also is a big factor, as stress-related hormones trigger acne flares.”

The hormonal changes of puberty are a well-known trigger. Additionally, certain medications like lithium, medicinal steroids or anabolic steroids can lead to acne, he said.

Skin care products not designed for patients prone to acne may create a flare. Markus advises patients to look for key words such as oil-free or non-comedogenic in selecting suitable skin care products in patients who are acne prone.

Why Your Skin Needs Protection From The Sun All Year Long

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sunWe all want healthier, younger looking skin, but as we age it gets harder and harder to achieve. One of the biggest factors that affect our skin over time is the sun.

Warm sunlight washing over our skin may feel nice; however, what’s happening under the epidermis isn’t. Years of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun can kill or damage skin cells causing:

  • Uneven pigmentation
  • Skin discoloration
  • Rough texture
  • Sunburns
  • Reduced elasticity
  • Reduced collagen production
  • Acceleration of the aging process (photoaging)
  • Skin cancer

Sunlight helps us produce vitamin D, but just a little too much is enough to damage skin cells. This guide will help you better understand how to lessen the damage that’s already been done and better protect your skin from harmful UV rays.

Correcting Past Sun Damage on the Skin

Chances are your skin has experienced some level of sun damage. Fortunately, doctors and researchers have discovered a number of natural ingredients that can help improve the damage that has already been done. They include:

  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin E
  • Vitamin A
  • Peptides
  • Hyaluronic Acid
  • Alpha Hydroxy Acids

Many of these ingredients are found in top-rated skin care products. Lines like Dermaclara also combine multiple products to maximize the effects. Customer reviews of Dermaclara reveal that many users see improvements in the signs of sun damage. When all five products are used together customers note that brown spots, wrinkles and dullness are all reduced.

Skin damage from the sun accumulates every day, which is why it’s important to begin correcting damage and protecting skin as early in life as possible. Creating a routine that you can stick to daily is also important. Moisturizing and protection is needed during the day while cleansing, moisturizing and nourishment is needed at night.

What You Need to Know About SPF

Many people make the mistake of thinking sunscreen is only needed during summer beach vacations. Even in the winter when the sun sets earlier and we’re huddled inside by the fire sunscreen is still a daily requirement for healthy skin. The winter sun can actually be even more harsh because of dryness, windburn and reflection off the snow.

The truth is sun protection is a daily need throughout every season. But today there are so many products with confusing labels that the hassle of selecting a sunscreen is enough to keep some people from using it.

There are really just a few key things to look for, and one of them is SPF.

SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. It’s a gauge of the percentage of UVB rays that are being blocked and how long the protection lasts. Theoretically the number indicates how many times longer the sunscreen protects the skin. For example, SPF 30 prevents UVB damage 30 times longer than the skin’s natural barrier of 20 minutes. However, experts suggest any sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours.

As far as the percentage of UVB rays that are blocked:

  • SPF 15 blocks 93%
  • SPF 30 blocks 97%
  • SPF 50 blocks 98%

A one percent difference is actually quite substantial when you consider that every day the damage is adding up. Experts recommend that you use at least SPF 15 even if you plan to spend just a few minutes outside.

UV Blocking Ingredients to Look For

The main purpose of sunscreen is to block damaging UV rays so they can’t easily penetrate the skin. The FDA has approved a number of ingredients that are proven to block UVA and UVB rays. These include:

UVB ABSORPTION

PABA derivatives
Salicylates
Cinnamates (octylmethoxycinnamate and cinoxate)

UVB ABSORPTION

Benzophenones (oxybenzone and sulisobenzone)
Avobenzone
Ecamsule (MexorylTM)
Titanium dioxide
Zinc oxide

The best sunscreens are broad spectrum. That means they protect against UVA and UVB rays. UVB rays cause burns and skin cancer. UVA rays penetrate to deeper layers of skin causing wrinkles, discoloration and dullness. Typically, two to three of the ingredients above are needed for complete protection.

When in doubt, look for the Skin Cancer Foundation’s seal of approval. This means that the sunscreen contains an ample supply of the UV-blocking ingredients above.

Nothing harms your skin more than the sun. Since forgoing the light of day isn’t a viable option, taking steps to reduce and prevent damage is a necessary part of your daily skin care routine. All it takes is a few extra minutes each morning and night to start seeing the skin you enjoyed in your younger, less sun damaged years.

– Submitted by Katherine Smith

Bright Ideas For Sun Protection And Skin Care

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Submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your comments below…..

sunSun Protection Factor (SPF) is not the only factor to consider when protecting your skin from the sun’s harmful rays.

“We all know SPF is important, but it extends beyond that,” said Dr. Ida Orengo, professor of dermatology and director of the Mohs/Dermatologic Surgery Unit at Baylor College of Medicine. “Diet, clothing and familiarity with your skin type all factor into sun protection.”

Diet

Diet can play a role in preventing skin cancer, Orengo said. The following items have been proven to reduce the growth of malignant cells and skin tumors:

* Omega-3 fatty acids

* Green tea

* Resveratrol (an ingredient in red wine)

“We have also conducted a study that proved low-fat diets play a role in preventing skin cancer,” she said.

For those looking to increase their skin’s threshold for sunburn, Heliocare® sun pills can help and, according to Orengo, a recent study showed that nicotinamide, a type of B vitamin, also may reduce the number of skin cancers one gets.

She recommends vitamin D supplements for people who are experts at avoiding the sun.

“It’s important to remember that we do need sun,” she said. “When sun hits the skin it transforms vitamin D into its active form. We need about 10 to 15 minutes of daily sun exposure for proper vitamin D levels. Vitamin D supports healthy brain, heart and immune system function.”

Your physician should be consulted before changing your diet or taking supplements. Orengo warns that diet alone cannot prevent or cure skin cancers, only help aid in the process.

Clothing

For long days out in the sun you’ll need more than sunscreen. Orengo suggested tossing out the baseball caps with ventilation holes and opting for a hat with no holes and at least a 3-inch brim.

“Consider buying lightweight clothing that properly covers and protects your body from the sun’s rays,” she said. “Many outdoor stores now sell sun-protective clothing. There also are products that will add SPF to your own clothing.”

Types of skin

Another tip to protecting your skin is to know your own skin type, said Orengo. The Fitzpatrick scale is a numerical classification system that recognizes how varying types of skin respond to sun exposure. Orengo said dermatologists are familiar with the scale but individuals should also take time to understand their own risk. .

Type 1: burn all the time

Type 2: burn every time, then turns into a light tan

Type 3: burn but get a good tan

Type 4: sometimes burn, always tans

Type 5: rarely burns, always tans

Type 6: never burns, always tans

“Types 1, 2 and 3 are more likely to get skin cancer,” she said. “Types 4, 5 and 6 can get skin cancer, but it’s less likely. They should still protect themselves from the sun.”

For some types of skin, sunblock may work better than sunscreen because it physically blocks ultraviolet radiation from penetrating the skin. This is especially true for people who have sensitive skin, Orengo said.

Regardless of your skin type, Orengo said skin health should be everyone’s concern and following these tips, as well as seeing your doctor regularly for skin checks, is a good way to prevent skin cancers.

Connecticut Dermatology Group Provides Complimentary Skin Cancer Screenings

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For our readers in the Norwalk, CT area. This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below….

informationredIn recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Connecticut Dermatology Group offers a complimentary skin cancer-screening event May 16th at their Norwalk location.

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. However, most skin cancers can be treated with great outcomes if found early.

With three offices in Connecticut, located in Norwalk, Milford and Stamford, Connecticut Dermatology Group (CDG) strives to make their patients and the entire Fairfield County community aware of skin cancer risks and the importance of early detection.

CDG will hold it’s second annual Free Screenings for Skin Cancer day at their Norwalk location, located at 761 Main Avenue this Saturday, May 16th from 8 AM – 12 PM.

This year they have launched the “Get Naked, Save a Life” campaign to focus on the life-saving aspect of a skin cancer screening.

CDG treats and cures more than 1,500 cases of skin cancer annually through Mohs Micrographic Surgery. Their Mohs Surgery Skin Cancer Treatment Center is the largest in Fairfield County and provides same-day, on-premise, and minimally invasive treatment of skin cancer tumors. Managing Partner and Castle Connolly Top Doctor 2015, Dr. Steven A. Kolenik III has completed over 19,000 Mohs procedures. He will be at the event to answer any questions.

In addition to the free screenings, the first 50 people to attend will receive a complimentary t-shirt. There will also be a raffle and free giveaways. Register here or call 203-810-4151 for more information!

About Connecticut Dermatology Group

Connecticut Dermatology Group (CDG) is a leader in dermatology services in Connecticut. Since it’s founding in 1964, CDG has provided comprehensive skin care to tens of thousands in Connecticut through its Norwalk, Milford, and Stamford offices. CDG is Fairfield County’s largest physician-directed skincare center providing medical and surgical care, as well as state-of-the-art cosmetic services. CDG has been designated as a national dermatological testing center to conduct clinical trials for new and upcoming medical and cosmetic services. Managing Partner, Dr. Steven A. Kolenik III has been peer nominated as 2015 Top Doctor in Fairfield County by Castle Connolly. Dr. Kolenik III has completed over 19,000 Mohs procedures.

Three Types Of Fungi Responsible For Most Fungal Skin Infections

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Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article…..please share your thoughts in the comments section below…..

footodorThree types of fungi are primarily responsible for the majority of fungal skin infections that afflict millions of Americans each year, says Joshua Fox, MD, medical director and founder of Advanced Dermatology P.C. Trichophyton, microsporum and epidermophyton, all part of the fungal genera category, are the three main culprits. Fungal infections of the skin account for about four million visits a year to outpatient medical facilities in the U.S. alone.

To understand how pervasive and hard-to-treat fungal skin infections can be, it is good to know how they emerge, explains Dr. Fox. Often described as superficial fungus infections, the microscopic organisms that cause them feed on warm, moist, dark environments, like the feet and the jock area. The four main microorganisms that cause fungal skin infections include bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi.

Athlete’s foot, jock itch, ringworm

Athlete’s foot is perhaps the most common of the fungal skin infections and very often one of the most stubborn, says Dr. Fox. There are three different types, including interdigital athlete’s foot, the most common form; moccasin athlete’s foot, which begins on the sole and spreads to the side of the foot; and vesicular athlete’s foot, which is the least common and shows up as blisters on the bottom of the foot. In fact, athlete’s foot (“jungle rot” as it was called) was one of the most the most common foot problems Vietnam veterans have suffered, and they still plague many veterans today.

The clinical reason for such outbreaks is due to an imbalance of microorganisms in the body, Dr. Fox explains. “A decrease in bacteria and an increase in the growth of fungi, sometimes caused by the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, is a common culprit,” he adds.

Jock itch is also a common complaint, especially among men. Jock itch, a form of ringworm, usually occurs in the groin area and on the upper, inner thighs and buttocks.

Ringworm, which can occur on the hands, nails, feet or scalp, typically appears as a circular rash with patches that may be red or peeling or have bumps that resemble blisters. Like the symptoms of athlete’s foot, the infected areas are often itchy and can spread easily. Blistering and cracking of the skin is particularly common on the feet.

A yeast-like fungus, known as Candida, is the culprit behind the common vaginal yeast infection, says Dr. Hu. Such yeasts normally live on the skin and mucous membranes without ever causing infection, she explains. But overgrowth of such organisms can produce an infection in certain areas of the body, adds Dr. Hu.

Tips for treating fungal skin infections

If over-the-counter medications don’t eliminate irritating fungal skin infections, Dr. Fox suggests medical intervention. The kind of treatment that’s given for most fungal skin infections depends on the severity of one’s condition, he notes. For some, oral treatment is the only solution.

“Many people have suffered with fungal skin infections for years,” Dr. Fox says. The choice of oral anti-fungal medications depends on the type of fungus that needs to be treated, the affected area, other co-existing diseases that a person might have and interactions with other medications currently being taken. The most common oral medications are Lamisil, Sporanox and Griseofulvin.

Maintaining best hygiene practices is perhaps the best way to prevent fungal skin infections from recurring or even happening at all. To prevent athlete’s foot, for example, Dr. Fox suggests wearing footwear in public locker rooms and shower areas. One should wash the feet daily and most importantly, dry them thoroughly. Wearing shoes that give feet room to breathe and wear cotton socks and underwear. If necessary use a powder to keep them dry.

Dr. Fox says that while fungal skin infections can be annoying to deal with, proper treatment and attention to hygiene practices can keep such conditions from recurring.

“Unfortunately there is evidence that fungal infections of the skin can recur, even after treatment,” says Dr. Fox. “However, with careful adherence to good hygiene and close monitoring we find that most patients can overcome fungal skin infections.”

Advanced Dermatology P.C., the Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery (New York & New Jersey) provides cutting edge medical, laser & cosmetic dermatology and plastic surgery services. http://www.advanceddermatologypc.com

Joshua L. Fox, M.D., F.A.A.D., is the founder and medical director at Advanced Dermatology P.C. He is a leading authority in the field of dermatology with expertise in skin cancer, cosmetic surgery and laser procedures and is program director of a fellowship in laser and cosmetic surgery

Judy Hu, M.D., F.A.A.D. is a board certified dermatologist with Advanced Dermatology P.C. Dr. Hu specializes in medical, surgical, and cosmetic dermatology with extensive experience in skin rejuvenation utilizing injections and laser therapy.

5 Winter Skin Care Tips To Banish Dry, Itchy Skin

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Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article. Please share your thoughts in the comments section below…..

femalewashingfaceSkin guru and founder of the award-winning skin clinic FACE Skincare~Medical~Wellness, Holly CaSaroll, is detailing several tips for dealing with dry, itchy skin during the winter season.

Holly CaSaroll, skin care expert and founder of FACE, an award-winning beauty clinic, is detailing several tips for individuals who suffer from dry, itchy skin during the winter season.

1. Exfoliate: “Your skin sheds thousands of dead cells on a daily basis, which can slow down as we age and cause a build-up of dry, itchy skin,” says CaSaroll. “AHA exfoliates adds moisture to the surface aiding in the repairing of sun damage and dryness. BHA exfoliates have anti-inflammatory agents beneficial to skin that is oily, acne and blackhead prone. I recommend exfoliating up to four times per week.”

2. Hydrate: Humectants work as a moisture magnet, pulling it from the air to the skin. According to CaSaroll, if there isn’t more than 70 percent humidity in a house then there isn’t enough moisture for the body to do its job properly. “Invest in a humidifier,” she says. “I also recommend using products containing hyaluronic acid because it’s water-binding and holds 1,000 times its weight in water which is vital for skin moisture.”

3. Use soothing agents: Looking for soothing ingredients such as aloe, oat bran, chamomile, cucumber, rose hip oil, burdock root, licorice root, and glycyrrhetinic acid. Incorporate toner or a spray mister in skin routines. “This step is often underrated, misunderstood and forgotten,” says CaSaroll.

4. Apply antioxidants: Antioxidants protect the skin from harmful free radicals. They also help protect from exposure to the sun, skin damage, signs of aging, and change in pigment. “Look for products that contain vitamins A, C and E, CoQ10, green tea, grape seed extract, plant oils, soybean sterols, and beta-glucan.”

5. Repair and protect: Products designed to repair increases moisture levels by providing an actual physical barrier, which prevents the loss of water from the epidermis. Look for products that contain pharmaceutical-grade mineral oil, ceramides, Shea butter, beeswax, silicone, cholesterol, fatty acids, and vegetable oils (think avocado or olive oil). “My favorite product is the new Avene Xeracalm. It is the most advanced cream for dry and itchy skin,” she says.

About FACE Skincare~Medical~Wellness:

FACE is a multi-award winning beauty and wellness clinic that has been providing successful innovative solutions to skin conditions for over a decade. Founded by skin expert, Holly CaSaroll, FACE offers 24 laser and facial machines, liquid facelifts and body makeovers. Over 17 years ago, CaSaroll rebuilt her own skin, disfigured from cystic acne, and has since created one of the most extensive clinics around. CaSaroll is a go-to skin guru and has been featured on TV and a bevy of publications. She currently pens a monthly column in “My Magazine,” titled “Ask the Expert.” Their Skin Management Experts™ specialize in non-invasive therapies using their unique 3D Face Therapy™ approach to healing skin that accelerates results from a cellular level. Her wellness division, headed by Dr. Doug Cutler, a Licensed Naturopathic Physician, finds the root cause of imbalances in the body to create overall well-being from the inside out. To see what FACE can do for you, please visit http://www.facebeautyscience.com/.

Managing Autumn And Winter Skin

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jogsnowJust as fall, and then winter, brings a variety of changes in the natural world, it’s also a mixed bag for our skin. Dr. Joshua Fox with Advanced Dermatology PC offers a rundown of some of the changes you can expect in your skin, plus tips on how to manage them.

During the autumn months the kids head back to school, the temperatures (finally!) get down to a comfortable level, the leaves change—and so does your skin. Fall is a time of transformation throughout nature, says Joshua L. Fox, MD, founder and medical director of NY and NJ-based Advanced Dermatology PC, so it shouldn’t be a big surprise that we humans go through transitions of our own this time of year. And just as fall, and then winter, brings a variety of changes in the natural world, it’s also a mixed bag for our skin. Dr. Fox offers a rundown of some of the changes you can expect in your skin, plus tips on how to manage them.

Welcome to the dry season. While lower humidity is great for anyone who battles frizzy hair and a shiny forehead all summer, it means drier skin for everybody, as less moisture in the air translates almost immediately to a corresponding drop in the moisture in us. What’s more, turning on the heat in your home also dries you out, no matter whether the heat comes from electricity, gas, or firewood.

To keep your skin beautiful and properly nourished this fall and winter, Dr. Fox recommends switching moisturizers, trading in the lotion for a cream or something else that’s more emollient. This goes for the skin on your body as well as your face. Use products made with humectants (such as glycerine, sorbitol urea, and alpha-hydroxy acids), which attract moisture to your skin, and look for an oil-based moisturizer for off the face, which will create a protective layer to hold that moisture in.

To combat dryness from the inside, stay hydrated (drink plenty of water and keep alcohol and caffeine to a minimum). You should note, however, that the old saying about drinking 8 to 10 glasses of water a day to keep your beautiful is a myth, Dr. Fox says. “We know that water is essential to keep the body functioning. But unless you’re dangerously dehydrated, drinking extra water won’t show up in your skin.” What can help, he says, is adding a humidifier to the rooms where you spend the most time—probably where you sleep and work. “Humidifiers add moisture to the air, which helps keep your skin from drying out.”

femalewashingfaceMake a date to exfoliate. After a summer spent outdoors, most people have exposed their skin to sun and wind (hopefully with sunscreen). But regardless of the SPF you’ve been using, Dr. Fox says, your skin has probably gotten at least some damage and may well show the signs: a dull and uneven surface (thanks to built-up skin cells), dry texture and hyper-pigmented patches. “Fall is a great time to have an in-office exfoliation procedure, such as microdermabrasion or a chemical peel,” he says. “You also might consider photorejuvenation, which uses a laser technique known as IPL (intense pulsed light, Blue
light or lasers) to improve the look of freckles, spots, and other sun damage.”

At home, Dr. Fox says, slough off dull skin and get your face and body springtime-smooth again with gentle exfoliants (try a hydrating mask on your face and an oil-based scrub on your body). Just don’t overdo it, especially if your face is already feeling irritated or extra dry.

Acne adjustments. The season’s cooler temperatures, coupled with drying acne treatments, can leave even oily and acne-prone skin feeling tight and flaky. Unless your dermatologist advises differently, keep up your regular acne treatments, but switch to a slightly heavier moisturizer (look for one that’s oil free and noncomedogenic) and cut back on cleansing.

Rosacea reinforcements. The stronger winds and cooler temperatures of autumn can leave some faces red and inflamed—especially those with rosacea. Other rosacea triggers, including indoor heat and hot beverages, can make things even worse. To keep your skin under control, use a humidifier and set indoor temps at the lowest comfortable setting, let the coffee (or cocoa) cool before drinking it, and protect your skin with a scarf when you go outside. Stick to your prescribed skincare routine, but consider switching to a heavier moisturizer if your skin feels especially dry. Sometime and additional prescription may be required.

The attack of the chicken skin (aka keratosis pilaris). Autumn is also a time for flare-ups of the condition dermatologists call keratosis pilaris (KP) or lichen spinalosis, characterized by bumps on the backs of the upper arms and thighs (which are caused by a buildup of keratin in and around the hair follicles) and exacerbated by dry conditions. To fight it, exfoliate gently and bump up the moisturizer (you might even switch to an ultra-rich ointment for KP patches). It that is not helpful, dermatologists have several prescriptions that can help clear up the condition.

Allergy alert! Changes in your skin during the fall months can also be triggered by increased exposure to allergens such as pollen, ragweed and mold. Allergic skin reactions can include itchiness, redness, puffiness, and flakiness (more severe symptoms include swelling, hives, rashes and blisters). If you’re allergic to pollen, wash your face and hands after you’ve been outside and keep the windows closed during peak pollen times (roughly 10 am to 4 pm). If ragweed or mold is your nemesis, use an air purifier with a HEPA filter. And moisturize often (with a hypoallergenic product).

Advanced Dermatology P.C., the Center for Laser and Cosmetic Surgery (New York & New Jersey) provides cutting edge medical, laser & cosmetic dermatology and plastic surgery services. http://www.advanceddermatologypc.com

Joshua L. Fox, M.D., F.A.A.D., is the founder and medical director at Advanced Dermatology P.C. He is a leading authority in the field of dermatology with expertise in skin cancer, cosmetic surgery and laser procedures and is program director of a fellowship in laser and cosmetic surgery

– Courtesy of PRWeb

Keep Your Child’s Skin Healthy And Glowing

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By Jennifer Clark

malewashingfaceGood skincare doesn’t only have to do with great products on the market. Eating right makes a big difference as well. This is important not only for adults, but also for our children. You can purchase specified products based upon skin type. Products like the Best BB Cream for Oily skin are very effective for improving the feel and appearance of the skin. Healthy food choices play an important role in the overall status of your skin.

Parents always want to teach their children to develop habits that are healthy. The things that we eat affect how our bodies perform. At the same time, food can have an effect on your skin and how it looks. Having skin that is healthy and glowing is an indicator of good health and nutritional choices. Fruits and vegetables are terrific selections in this process. Healthy meat selections will positively affect your skin’s appearance.

Children of different ages often have to develop a taste for healthy food choices. Starting early with introducing these foods is best. It will result in better life choices where the diet is concerned. This is also a good way to keep healthy skin for a lifetime. Let’s take a look at some foods that can have a great impact on your child’s skin.

Fish and Seafood

There are many health benefits of eating fish and other seafood items. Omega-3 fatty acids are often associated with eliminating skin issues such as acne. Salmon and sardines are two great choices in this category that can help your child’s skin. Diets lacking the fatty acids found in fish and seafood have been connected to inflammation issues.

This can result blocked pores and an overproduction of oil. Children with particularly oily skin can benefit from a rounded diet that includes fish and seafood. There are various ways to cook these foods and still enjoy their benefits. Baking and broiling are top ways to prepare this food choice. Experimenting with seasonings and sauces can be very helpful.

Walnuts

If your child’s skin is dry, walnuts can be a good food choice. These nuts will give the skin and the diet a healthy boost. Walnuts tend to add moisture to the diet and are great as snacks of accents to various dishes. This nut is a good source of one particular Omega-3 fatty acid. They include ALA or alpha-linolenic acid that lubricates the skin.

Many people who suffer from eczema have a deficiency in ALA. Fresh walnuts can be added to vegetable salads, as well as, those that include meat. Roasting these nuts before using them as ingredients is a good idea. Children may prefer these as snacks alone or with other food choices.

Eggs

eggsEggs are one of the world’s best breakfast choices. They can be used for other meals as well. Brunch and dinner dishes with eggs are delicious. Another reason to enjoy eggs is because of their benefits to the skin. Because eggs are high in lutein and zeaxanthin, they are associated with strengthening skin cells. Fine lines and wrinkles are smoothed because of the composition of eggs.

Lutein, in particular, is a benefit to your child’s skin. It works to build the connective tissue that presents a healthy appearance. The skin keeps its shape and appeal because of lutein, which is also good for eye health. Eggs can be prepared in a variety of ways. Hot dishes like scrambled eggs or casseroles are tasty choices. Cold selections like deviled-eggs are fun dishes to prepare for children.

Water

Drinking at least 8 glasses of water daily has long been promoted. There is a list of reasons behind this goal. Water is a natural detox beverage that works to rid the body of toxins that affect the body and skin alike. Encouraging your children to drink enough water is a great way to promote skin health. Dehydration can occur if the body doesn’t get the right amount of water.

The skin is one area where this condition can be seen. Dark circles around the eyes can develop as a result of dehydration. Dry skin is another result of this water deficiency. Pure and filtered water is the best choice for daily consumption. Switching from sweet drinks to water is a wonderful way to treat the skin. At the same time, you can prevent dehydration and its symptoms.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are not vegetables only to be enjoyed in the fall. These great veggies can be used throughout the year as a source of beta-carotene. The body converts beta-carotene into Vitamin A, which is healthy for your child’s skin. This vitamin is responsible for the smooth and glowing appearance of the skin. The skin’s texture also benefits from the composition of sweet potatoes.

Eating this vegetable can result in softer feeling skin overall. Children may prefer sweet potatoes in a number of ways. Raw treats with dips are one way to use these potatoes. Baking them similar to white potatoes is another idea. Roasting sweet potatoes with other veggies can be a great way to accent a meat entree.

You can purchase specific products like the Best BB Cream for Oily skin as a part of your regime. Eating healthy food selections is a good way to ensure the health of the skin. Children products are available to treat individual conditions. It is possible to avoid skin issues by encouraging healthier food choices for children. These are habits that will result in beautiful glowing skin.

– This is Jennifer Clark here, a skincare & beauty enthusiast and Editor at SkincareHQ.org from San Antonio, TX. She recommends taking the Best BB Cream for Oily skin for absolutely beautiful, glowing skin. When she isn’t writing, Jennifer loves to hang out with friends and re-read the Harry Potter series.