Benefits Of Attending A College Preparatory School

Share Button

By Jamshed

teensThere are a number of benefits offered to students who attend a preparatory school. This is considered a bold approach to education and combines a number of academic concepts allowing students to thrive while learning advanced concepts sooner than they would in traditional education facilities. These schools blend higher education coursework with general studies in order to help give students a head start. Usually, these types of schools will allow you access to POA Tuition professionals to help you out.

Any parent or student that has considered enrolling in a preparatory school needs to be dedicated to focusing on the, often challenging, academic requirements. The good news is that each of these schools is specifically designed to help increase graduation rates and help to prepare students for a meaningful career.

A question that many people have in regard to prep schools is whether or not they really work. These schools undergo evaluations to report how the programs work and the outcome of the education a student receives. If the school is not performing as well as it should be, or there are serious questions regarding the effectiveness, then the schools may be shut down or have to undergo serious changes in their educational model in order to keep their doors open.

The fact is that prep schools are becoming increasingly important with the growing competitiveness in the job market. Students now need to seek a post-secondary education in order to ensure their financial security down the road. The programs used at these schools allow students to prepare for college coursework and see, first-hand, how rigorous it can be when studying for college level courses. This helps to ease the students into the life of a college student and increase their chances of success significantly.

Additionally, many schools offer students the ability to actually earn college credit while still in high school. This provides them a jump-start on their college degree. It will also help to minimize the amount of time the student has before seeking work in the job market. Students that complete this type of education will also have a much lower cost for college tuition since they already have two years of credits completed.

However, the most appealing benefit for many parents and students is the fact that these preparatory schools make college a real possibility for students who may have otherwise never had the opportunity or will to attend. These programs are not only beneficial for students, but also for the future of the community as a whole.

Allergic To School? Classroom Furniture May Be The Source

Share Button

This article is courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine….please share your thoughts below…..

schoolbusIf your child claims to be allergic to school, there might be something to it. According to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine, allergic reactions may be caused by what students sit on.

“Sometimes we see children come in with rashes on the back of their thighs, and we typically find out that they’re allergic to something that they’re sitting on,” said Dr. Rajani Katta, professor of dermatology at Baylor. “We call this school girl or school child dermatitis because it is often caused by the nickel in bolts on chairs at school.”

If someone is allergic to nickel and wears shorts or a skirt while sitting in this type of chair for prolonged periods of times, a red patchy rash may appear. In severe cases blisters may form.

Sweat pulls more nickel out of an object, which also can cause a bigger reaction, she said.

“These reactions are a delayed allergy, which means a rash might not appear until two or three days after exposure,” Katta said. “The rash tends to be worse in areas where nickel is in closer contact with the skin and for longer periods of time.”

Besides nickel reactions, patchy rashes may also appear on children allergic to chemicals in leather furniture, she said.

Dermatologists can treat both reactions with prescription creams that cut down on the inflammation in the skin.

6 Practical Steps To Overcome Back To School Stress

Share Button

By Kellie Lupe-Smith

schoolbusSchool is about to start up again and for many kids a variety of emotions begin to surface ranging from excitement, nervous anticipation to all out dread and panic. Starting a new school year is about, making new friends, meeting new teachers, buying new clothes, book bags, facing bullies, learning a new curriculum and of course – homework. In the year 2015, going back to school brings a host of new stresses that many parents and teachers didn’t have when they were growing up. In the digital age kids are getting less and less sleep because their minds are over stimulated by electronics and lack of sleep can create a number of problems, mood swings, weight gain and brain fog. Kids are also suffering from overwhelming stress due to social anxiety, sports pressures and even weight gain due to stress eating.

The good news is, there are tools that can have an immediate impact on adolescents in stressful and uncomfortable situations. Here are the top six techniques that parents and teachers can use to help students (and themselves) stay relaxed this back-to-school season.

1. Breathe deeply and correctly. When the human body encounters stress of any kind, our chest constricts causing more shallow breathing to occur. In this way we only utilize a small portion of our lung capacity and typically we only use the upper part of our torso. This allows the sympathetic nervous system to be activated thereby creating a fight-or-flight response. Instead, if you breathe deeply involving the lower part of the lungs and diaphragm you can activate the parasympathetic nervous system creating a rest-and-digest response.

2. Elevate the feet. Another way to stimulate the rest-and-digest response is to elevate the feet. One of the best and most effective ways to do this is lying on your back with your legs resting on a chair or against the wall. In yoga this posture is called Viparita Karani.

3. Hypnotherapy. Hypnotherapy offers a solution that can have benefits that last into adulthood. Hypnosis is a method of getting one’s mind into a state of concentrated awareness so they can find resolutions within themselves and create change in a positive and lasting way.

4. Remember you’re not alone. Sometimes knowing that every other parent and student out there is experiencing something similar, can relieve you from feelings of isolation. Remember that we are a community of people with a common goal of being the best student, parent, or teacher we can be.

kids5. Think more about what you want. It astounds me how many people when asked what they want can only name me a list of what they don’t want. The fact is that the subconscious mind cannot process negatives directly so whenever you think “I don’t want to stay awake all night” or “I don’t want to eat too much candy” your brain only hears “stay awake all night” and “eat candy.” The subconscious mind if left to its own devices is like an unruly child, doing whatever it wants, whenever it wants. It needs direction. So when you can tell the mind exactly what you want, it knows what to do and can do it. The subconscious mind loves to follow orders. In essence what you think about you bring about.

6. Change your perspective. Lastly and most importantly, gain a broader perspective of your life. Imagine you can see into the future and know something good is coming. Imagine that you already knew everything works out in the end, you get through the school year and actually have a lot of fun along the way. Remember your life one year ago and recognize all that you have accomplished in that year. Do you even remember the things that worried you one year ago? Now imagine your life five years from now. How do you look back and see your life differently looking back toward today? The small detail of starting schools seems smaller and more manageable when you know the big picture.

Have a wonderful 2015-2016 school year! May this be your best school year yet.

Kellie Lupe-Smith is a certified Hypnotherapist and Yoga Teacher. She is the owner of Studio City Hypnosis and creator of Hypno Yoga LA. Her mission is to help those who suffer from stress, weight issues or breaking bad habits so they can live the life they deserve. Her background includes Neuro Linguistics, Mindfulness Meditation, Yoga Philosophy and Advanced Hypnosis.

Automated Lap Counter For Mileage Club And School Walk-A-Thons With Tablet Control

Share Button

kidsunningtogetherSchool Mileage Programs and Walk-A-Thon fund raisers just got easier with new Tablets and hands free RFID technology. Using state of the art technology that allows communication via Wi-Fi and cellular, Orbiter Lap Counter / Timer is easy to use. No wires or cables and 3 minute set up.

New embellishments include:

Tablet Operation: Allows Teachers to easily command their class and see real time results on the tablet. Easy to move around on the playground and provide immediate feedback to
students.

Teacher Tag with no batteries: Allows remote control of mileage programs so that students may trade tags between class periods, and individual student effort still tracked. This allows
economy and ease of operation as the entire school does not need a tracking tag for each student.

Optional: Dual Cellular and Wi-Fi Modem Operation, . Other modems required either Wi-Fi
to operate or the cellular modem but not both. Orbiter’s unique modem allows posting of immediate results to cell phones, and the Teacher control tablet. Family and friends now can enjoy seeing immediate results and encourage student progress.

Back Ground: Orbiter is an RFID company that started business in 2006. It is comprised
hardware and software engineers with RFID experience since the mid 90’s. They have produced easy to use software that is specifically designed for physical education teachers. Orbiter is now on version 4. Orbiter partners with Zebra and Motorola. By tracking students rather than RFID tags, lost tags are easily replaced and continuity of past effort retained. The Orbiter system has been tested and used on playgrounds for many years. Tablet operation, Teacher Tag, and dual modems are new for 2015.

Orbiter will be shown at the SHAPE Seattle Convention, at the Washington Athletic Club,
1325 6th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101 (2 ½ city blocks from the SHAPE Convention Center) between March 17 – 21. Call 866-938-3587 for more information.

Study Finds School Lunches From Home Not Up To National Standards

Share Button

Submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine

kidseatinghealthyIn a study of lunches brought from home at elementary and middle schools in the Houston area, researchers at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital found that the lunches did not meet National School Lunch Program guidelines. Their report appears in JAMA Pediatrics.

“Most studies focus on the foods provided by the schools; but many children bring their lunches from home. Lunches from home should contain healthy foods and help children meet national dietary recommendations,” said Dr. Karen Cullen, professor of pediatrics at Baylor and senior author of the study.

Researchers examined lunches that were brought from home by 242 elementary and 95 middle school students. Nutrient and food group content of the lunches were assessed and compared with current National School Lunch Program guidelines. Per-serving prices for each item were averaged.

The study found that lunches from home had more sodium and fewer servings of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and milk. About 90 percent of lunches contained desserts, snack chips and sweetened beverages, which are not permitted in reimbursable school meals. The average cost of an elementary lunch from home was $1.93 and $1.76 for the intermediate school students.

“These results suggest that lunches from home may be an important area in need of budget–friendly interventions,” said Cullen.

Michelle L. Caruso from the Houston Department of Health and Human Services also took part in the study.

The study was funded in part by federal funds from the USDA/ARS under Cooperative Agreement No. 6250-51000-053. The work was also supported by grant RO1HD068349 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development.

Tough Love Tips For Better Back To School Sleep

Share Button

By Robert S. Rosenberg

SleepingWomanNear the end of summer we all have a hard time adjusting back to our regular sleep schedule – especially our kids! Here are 9 tips to help get your kids to adjust from their summer sleep schedule to their back-to-school sleep schedule:

* Gradually get back into the school sleep-wake schedule 2 weeks before school

* Maintain that schedule – even on weekends!

* Establish a relaxing bedtime routine

* Avoid vigorous physical activities after dinner

* Avoid video games, television and other electronics within 2 hours of sleep

* Avoid large meals close to bedtime

* Avoid all caffeine-containing foods and drinks within 6 hours of bedtime

* A dark room + comfortable temperatures = better sleep environment

* Be a role model- Establish your own sleep-wake schedule and STICK TO IT!

– Robert S. Rosenberg, DO, FCCP has over 20 years of experience in the field of sleep medicine. Board certified in sleep medicine, pulmonary medicine, and internal medicine, Dr. Rosenberg serves as the Medical Director of the Sleep Disorders Center of Prescott Valley, Arizona and sleep medicine consultant for Mountain Heart Health Services in Flagstaff, Arizona. He is a contributing sleep expert blogger at EverydayHealth.com and his advice has appeared in O, The Oprah Magazine, Prevention, Women’s Health, Woman’s World, Parenting, and Ladies’ Home Journal, among others. Dr Rosenberg is the author of Sleep Soundly Every Night; Feel Fantastic Every Day (Demos Health). He appears regularly on television and radio and lectures throughout the country on Sleep Medicine. Learn more about Dr. Rosenberg by visiting AnswersForSleep.com.

When Preparing For “Back To School,” Don’t Forget About Healthy After-School Snacks

Share Button

groupkidsPreparing a child’s lunch is an important part of the back-to-school routine, but experts at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital say that thinking about healthy after-school snacks is also important to consider.

“Having one-to-two healthy snacks in addition to three meals a day is what is typically recommended for school-aged kids,” said Dr. Teresia O’Connor, assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor and pediatrician at Texas Children’s. “If you’re eating three healthy meals a day, then the snacks should be small, and parents should think of it as an opportunity to get good, healthy nutrition into their child.”

O’Connor recommends picking foods that will help children get the energy they need for the rest of the afternoon while also offering snacks that will help them meet daily nutritional goals. For example, it is recommended that children get at least five fruits and vegetables per day, so a way to achieve this is to offer fruit and vegetable snacks.

“Many kids come home after school having had an early lunch and are pretty hungry, so picking snack foods that will help them feel full, but not over full or stuffed is important. That way they are not ravenous by the time dinner comes around, but hungry enough to eat a healthy meal” said O’Connor.

O’Connor suggests incorporating proteins and whole grains for satiety and also combining fruits and vegetables with proteins and whole grains. See her recommendations here.

What to avoid

She notes that snacks to keep to a minimum are those with added or excess sugar, such as candy, cookies; as well as fried foods, such as chips. These snacks should be the exception, not the rule.

“Everything can be eaten in moderation, but those kinds of foods are the ‘every now and then’ types of food and not the ‘go-to every day’ as an afternoon snack,” she said.

Snacks can be important

O’Connor emphasizes the importance of giving children a healthy snack to be sure they are able to focus on their homework and have the energy to engage in playtime or sports. However, make sure that the snack is healthy and has good nutrients in it instead of a high-calorie snack that does not have many nutrients but adds a lot of fat and sugar.

Timing of snacks

What time children have a snack varies on what your family schedule is like. Snacks should not be eaten less than an hour before dinner, because children may then not be as hungry for dinner. A healthy snack allows them to avoid being extremely hungry for dinner and eating too fast or more than they need.

“Snacks provide that balance so that you go into dinner feeling a little bit hungry but not ravenous,” said O’Connor.

After-school care

If kids are in an after-school program, check to see if the program offers snacks and talk to program leaders to see if they are healthy. If the snacks are not healthy, talk to the program coordinator to see if you can pack something small and healthy for your child.

After-school sports

boysoccerIf children are involved in after school sports, it can be important for them to have a snack before they spend an hour or two in physical activity after the school day.

“Proteins and whole grains are going to stay with them a lot longer than a candy bar. The kind of nutrients you get from proteins and whole grains give you energy for a much longer sustained time than processed simple sugars,” said O’Connor.

Healthy drinks

It is also important to think about what your kids are drinking – be sure they are not taking in empty calories and excess sugars from their drinks. Try to avoid sodas, sports drinks and fruit drinks.

Instead, try to incorporate a glass of water or a glass of skim milk.

“I find that a lot of kids don’t get adequate hydration during the day,” said O’Connor. “Try getting your kids used to drinking a glass of water when they get home to make sure they’re keeping their bodies hydrated.”

Older children

Many middle school and high school students arrive home before their parents, and O’Connor says parents should be sure they are creating an environment where these teens are more likely to pick healthy snacks rather than unhealthy snacks. This means making sure foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grain crackers and low-fat yogurt without a lot of sugar are available to them and making sure that the pantry is not full of potato chips, candies and cookies.

“Think ahead of time about how you are setting up your pantry and refrigerator and make the environment at home a healthy one,” she said.

Set the example

There are a few things that parents can do to help their kids make healthier choices. The first is getting them involved in helping you pick healthy snacks at the grocery store – they are more likely to eat the foods if they are able to choose themselves. Also, parents should act as role models for healthy eating. If parents come home and have a glass of water and fruits and vegetables, their children are more likely to follow this.

O’Connor also notes that in some cultures, the after-school meal is the main dinner and says that this still fits into a healthy diet as long as there are still only three meals and one-to-two snacks a day.

– Submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine

10 Helpful Tips To Prepare Your Child With Autism For School

Share Button

By Pamela Bryson-Weaver, R.D.H, author of Living autism day.by.day

schoolbusWith the school opening looming up ahead, the idea of transitioning your child with autism can prove to be daunting. Starting school can be a difficult time even for normal kids, more so with a child who has limited cognitive, social, and other developmental skills. Like normal kids, children on the spectrum also feel the same excitement and anxiety. This change can be difficult for them— the scenery, the people, their responsibility as students, co-existing with others, and so on. This often leads to sudden (and somehow negative) changes in behavior.

By now, you must have already looked into a number of schools in your area and have found the right one for your child. To gear your child for the so-called “first day high,” try looking into these helpful tips and see if any of these can work with his or her level of ASD.

1. Try creating a social story to go along with the preparation. Pictures and video presentation prove to be effective channels to show them what school is like, how to go with the usual morning/afternoon routine, and other school activities.

2. Create creatively the list of daily activities he or she will have to take from waking up to brushing, walking/riding to school, entering the classroom, and so on. If possible, try to ask the school administration if it is okay for you and your child to look around.

3. Prepare a calendar complete with pictures. Indicate lunch with the picture of the school cafeteria or toilet time with the comfort room or playtime with a picture of the school playground with children playing.

4. Before school officially starts, ask if it is okay for your child to meet his or her new teacher. Let the teacher and the school’s guidance counselor know about certain “obsessions” that your child may have. Often, visiting school ahead of time and meeting the people he or she will encounter head-on can ease their way into transition.

5. Communicate, communicate. Whatever your child’s ASD level, it is imperative that you ask about what he or she feels. Engage him or her in the whole process. His or her feelings should come first and foremost on this journey. Make him or her feel secured and assured, that school is a safe haven. Instill happy thoughts in meeting new friends. He or she may be socially challenged, but this does not negate the thought of feeling the same level of excitement in meeting new acquaintances.

6. Reassure your child that school is his or her second home. While “Mommy” or “Daddy” help resolves problems for him at home, he or she now has an extra set of helping hands with “teacher” (be specific with the name of the teacher to make him familiar) around.

7. Try to check if there are kids in the neighborhood who will be going on the same classes with your child. Sometimes, letting them connect to others before school starts can greatly eliminate unforeseen circumstances during transition.

8. Make sure to find out what after-school activities can your child join. Some sports activities are excellent activities for children with ASDs.

9. Include your child’s therapist on this process. It is imperative that you are fully guided on every endeavor you pursue to ensure zero meltdown.

10. Be extra attentive. Some kids on the spectrum have a hard time coping with these sudden changes. Make sure to prioritize your child’s welfare before anything else.

Each child with Autism Spectrum Disorder has a different way of dealing with changes in their environment. These tips may prove to be effective to others but, in everything else, you alone know what works best for him or her.

– Pamela Bryson-Weaver is the author of Living autism day.by.day: Daily Reflections & Strategies to Give You Hope and Courage, being published in October by Freedom Abound, Inc. October is Autism Awareness Month in Canada (Bryson-Weaver lives in New Brunswick). Autism Awareness Month in the U.S. Is April. Since her son was diagnosed with autism 15 years ago, Bryson-Weaver has become an advocate, speaker and activist for children with special needs, children who are close to heart. Learn more at livingautismnow.com.

Disclaimer – The Your Health Journal web site is for advice and information purposes only. It is meant to be an educational site. Opinions expressed by other individuals on this web site through guest posts or comments does not mean the creators of this website support their opinions or products. In fact, anything written on this site does not mean it is endorsed by anyone affiliated with this web site! Although we try to do checks of anyone who contributes to our site, we can also not be responsible for any false information they give, whether in their title, or facts they send. If you see an error, please send an email, and we will fix it immediately or remove an the article. If you have a question about the article, you should contact the author directly.

Why School Lunches Could Be Adding To The Obesity Epidemic And What You Can Do To Help

Share Button

groupkidsAs your child walks in from school, takes off his backpack and slumps on the couch, obviously exhausted from a full day of school, you may wonder why his energy has vanished. Ask him what he had for lunch in the school cafeteria, and you may find your answer.

From pizza and French fries to fruit dripping with rich corn syrup and canned, processed vegetables, your child’s food choices may be less than desirable to a health-conscious parent. It’s no wonder your child’s energy is gone and his clothes keep getting tighter.

Many parents are finding that school lunches could be adding to the childhood obesity epidemic. Luckily, there is something you can do to help.

What’s For Lunch?

“The problem with many school lunches, or meals rather, is that they are highly processed,” says Elizabeth Prebish, registered dietitian for Organic Life, provider of healthy lunches in Chicago, Illinois. “Many school lunches include processed meats, fried foods and high amounts of sugars or carbohydrates.”

With restricted budgets to feed large quantities of mouths, typical food service companies use conventional meats that contain hormones, antibiotics and steroids – all things small children do not need, says Prebish.

In addition to lunch, it’s possible your child is filling up on sweets as well. The school lunch system provides many opportunities for sweets, including offering ice cream and bakery items, not to mention chocolate milk. “Having these items as daily options is definitely a contribution to the obesity epidemic,” says Prebish. “These processed sugars are addictive, leaving children craving the same foods not only in school but when they are home as well.”

Snack Time

kidseatinghealthyFrom Halloween and fall festivals to school picnics and class parties, a celebration with food is a common occurrence in the classroom. Beyond the gorging of party cookies and cakes, some nutrition experts believe that even healthier snacks scheduled into the daily classroom schedule can contribute to childhood obesity.

“The number one way in which schools contribute to childhood obesity is by scripting snacks into the daily schedule,” says Adrienne Hew, nutrition specialist and founder of NutritionHeretic.com. “Children who are well fed do not need snacks – having snacks scripted into the schedule drives them to want to eat even when they are not hungry.”

The idea of incorporating snacks into the school day derived from a practice used for diabetics that uses small meals throughout the day to help keep blood sugar steady, says Hew. “However, the snacks that are offered to children would kill a diabetic – crackers, cookies, Cheerios and juice,” she says.

Cooking Up Change

In order to prompt change, parents need to offer solutions and suggestions to school districts and school board members. Offering a viable solution that is realistic with decreased school budgets is key.

“I would love to see schools engage with the community by going to local farmers or food co-ops and cutting cheap or free deals to absorb their leftover produce or produce that isn’t perfect for selling at the stand but can still be salvaged for making soups, stews and salads,” says Hew.

Another inexpensive option would be to recruit culinary students to complete internships in the schools as apprenticing or head chefs under the supervision of the person who normally is in charge of budgeting, suggests Hew. This economically-appealing option would give interns the opportunity to practice their skills, prepare healthy, innovative meals for school lunches and afford the district with a cost-effective option.

Parents can also advocate for a food service system that offers more natural products, says Prebish. “If this is not an option, work with your food service provider to determine more healthful substitutions that the children will also enjoy,” she says. “Try for more natural, and even organic, products wherever possible.”

In addition to working with food service systems, make yourself known at school board meetings. Parents can work to improve lunch selections by speaking to the board, the community and fellow parents. At each meeting try to provide a suggestion for healthier options, such as replacing meat-based burgers with veggie burgers.

According to Dr. Timothy Radak, faculty member in the Public Health program at Walden University, veggie burgers typically have one-third the amount of fat, no cholesterol and are similar in regards to the amount of protein as meat-based burgers.

Suggest cost-saving, evidence-based ideas to show the benefits to the district’s bottom line and the overall health of each student on campus. Schools could also reduce or eliminate some foods with health risks, such as red meat, processed foods or sugary drinks, says Radak. “Use the cost savings to provide more fresh fruits, vegetables and low fat, nutritious meal options.”

More importantly, educate your child about food, healthy eating habits and smart options for lunch. It is possible that when given the option, he may toss out the pizza and French fries for the veggie burger.

– Submitted by Nancy Parker of eNannySource.com

What To Do If Your Child Has An Asthma Attack At School

Share Button

groupkidsIf getting a call from the school nurse can be unnerving, hearing that your child just had an asthma attack at school is downright terrifying. This especially holds true if the call marks the first time an asthma attack has ever happened. The only thing worse for parents than knowing that their child is suffering is knowing that their child is suffering when they can’t be there with him. Since parents cannot be with their asthmatic child 24 hours out of the day, ensuring the child and teachers know how to manage his asthma is the next best thing. If you’ve been told your child has had an asthma attack in school, hang in there as you learn about what to do next.

First Things First

The first thing you’ll want to do is find out the status of your child. If it is not under control, the school may have called 911 or may ask you to pick up your child seek medical attention. The emergency room should be your first stop if the attack is still in progress, but an attack that’s under control or has ended may only require a trip to his regular primary care physician.

Create a Plan with Your Pediatrician

Once the initial attack is under control, let your pediatrician know what happened and then make an appointment to create an action plan for your child’s asthma. On this action plan, write down what triggers your child’s asthma, what symptoms he exhibits when he begins to have a flare up, what medications he takes, along with the dosage, what to do when an asthma attack begins, and when to head to the emergency room. You also may want to ask the doctor if there should be any restrictions or any extra monitoring during exercise.

Talk with Your Child

Teaching your child to manage his asthma independently is the best thing you can do when he’s old enough to attend school. Both you and your child need the security of knowing that no matter where your child is or who he is with, he can handle his asthma. Therefore, share the action plan with your child and frequently go over the steps to managing his asthma and handling attacks.

Talk with School Administrators

inhalerShare your written action plan with your child’s school and request a meeting with his teacher, the school nurse and anyone else you feel should be involved. Explain your child’s medical history and how independent he is in handling his asthma. Make sure you cover not only how to handle his asthma in school, but also on field trips and during any after school activities. Ask questions to ensure that there is always someone present who can administer medication and work the peak flow meter. It’s important that the school is supportive of your child’s condition, and that they handle it in a way that will not embarrass your child and deter him from maintaining his care.

Also, find out if you child is allowed to carry his own medication, provided that you feel confident in his responsibility level. If the school does not allow it, you can request a 504 plan under the Americans with Disabilities Act that allows him to have the medication on him.

Handling Attacks in School

Your child’s medication should be easily accessible. If he is too young or not yet responsible enough to carry it himself, the medication should be close at hand to the classroom teacher and in the nurse’s office in a place that is within quick reach. It should also be close at hand for gym class and recess. This way if your child has an attack, the medication will be there to be used immediately no matter where he is.

Know the Triggers

There are some common triggers that children encounter in school, such as dust mites, cockroaches, chalk dust, perfume and cleaning products, just to name a few. If any of these are known culprits for your child, you should work that into their 504 Plan. For example, you can request that they use dustless chalk, avoid perfumes and certain cleaning products, that the school is treated for pests regularly, and that methods be employed that combat mold. If the classroom has a pet, you can ask for that to be removed as well if your child is allergic or triggered by dander.

Once you have gone through all of these steps, you can rest much easier knowing that you and your child have a good handle on his asthma and that you have taken control of the situation as much as possible. Creating action plans and taking preventative actions can change a situation that once caused vulnerability to one that empowers.

– Submitted by Kevin Thompson of Backup Care