Eye Cancer On The Rise: Reasons Prevention Is The Key To Saving Your Vision

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By Matthew Lynch

eyeMelanoma of the eye is one of the more common types of eye cancers and develops in melanocytes (the cells that produce melanin, which produces our skin colour). Whilst it is more common in skin, it can develop in the eye leading to eye cancer (sometimes referred to as choroidal or uveal melanoma).

In most cases, this type of cancer will develop in a part of the eye that isn’t visible from the outside, making it difficult to notice. It can start in the eyeball, the conjunctiva or the eyelid, but the most common starting point is the eyeball, or more specifically, the choroid, which creates the middle layer (the uvea) of your eye.

Treatments are available for these melanomas and depending on the case and the severity of the growth, vision may be unaffected. However, some larger melanomas can cause some vision loss.

The Symptoms of an Eye Melanoma

As mentioned previously, this type of cancer can go undetected due to the location of the melanomas and may only be noticed when someone has an eye test or undergoes laser eye surgery. It is not uncommon for companies to identify more underlying issues in their patients who come in for simple corrective surgery. Early warning signs include loss of peripheral vision, blurry or poor vision in one of your eyes, specks of dust (floaters) in your vision, a change in the shape of your pupil, flashing lights or a dark spot on your iris.

Should you find any of the above or you are concerned about your eye health, seek professional advice immediately.

Diagnosis Eye Melanoma

If your doctor is concerned about your eye health they may recommend further tests are carried out to establish whether or not you are suffering from an eye melanoma. They may conduct eye examinations, which involve looking for enlarged blood vessels on the outside of your eye; if these are present, it could indicate that a tumour is growing inside your eye. They will then look at the inside of your eye using specialist equipment that generates a bright light.

Ultrasounds of the eye may also be used to detect any growths. The eye specialist will place a transducer on the front of your eye or closed eyelid and the high-frequency soundwaves will enable them to spot any anomalies.

Angiograms can also be used in these cases, which involve injecting a dye into your bloodstream. This will enhance the blood vessels of the eye and will allow the doctor to take images of these around the affected area.

Available Treatments for Eye Cancer

How your doctor treats your eye melanoma will depend on the size and location of it. If it’s small and isn’t affecting your vision, they may choose to closely monitor it in case it grows. Or, if it is causing complications, surgery to remove the tumour may be considered. In severe cases where the tumour is particularly large, the eye may be removed (enucleation). Radiotherapy and laser treatments may also be offered as an additional precaution.

If you are concerned about your eye health or you’ve noticed some changes in your vision, get in touch with your eye specialist today to arrange an appointment.

– Matthew Lynch has wanted to be an optician ever since he was 15 years old. Now well on his way to his dream career Matt wants to share his passion with more people. He doesn’t feel there is enough awareness of eye health and hopes his articles will help on that front. Visit Laser Eye Surgery Hub if you’re interested in learning more about laser eye surgery options.

Study Shows That Teens Lose Sleep After Change To Daylight Saving Time

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, please share your comments below…..

SleepingWomanA new study shows that high school students lose sleep on school nights following the change to daylight saving time that occurs in March. The loss of sleep during the school week was associated with a decline in vigilance and cognitive function, which raises safety concerns for teen drivers.

Results show that the average objectively measured sleep duration on the weeknights after the spring time change declined to 7 hours, 19 minutes, which reflects a mean loss of 32 minutes per night compared with the school week prior to the implementation of daylight saving time. Average cumulative sleep loss on weeknights following the time change was 2 hours, 42 minutes. During school days after the time change, students also displayed increased sleepiness and a decline in psychomotor vigilance, including longer reaction times and increased lapses of attention.

“For many years now, sleep researchers have been concerned about sleep deprivation in adolescents,” said principal investigator Dr. Ana Krieger, medical director of the Weill Cornell Center for Sleep Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and associate professor of clinical medicine, of medicine in clinical neurology, and of clinical genetic medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. “This study unveils a potential additional factor that may further restrict their sleep in the early spring.”

Study results are published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

According to the authors, this is the first study to quantify the detrimental effects of daylight saving time implementation using objective measurements of sleep duration and vigilance in students attending high school.

The study group comprised 35 high school students with a mean age of 16.5 years. Nightly sleep duration was measured at home by actigraphy during the weeks prior to and after the change to daylight saving time. Participants also completed a sleep diary to report subjective sleep measures. Measurements of daytime sleepiness and vigilance were collected using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT).

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that adolescents get a little more than nine hours of nightly sleep for optimal health and daytime alertness during the critical transition from childhood to adulthood.

“Getting adequate sleep is key for many facets of an adolescent’s development,” said Dr. Nathaniel F. Watson, president of the AASM. “This study raises significant concern about the consequences of impeding their already hectic sleep schedules with Daylight Saving Time every spring.”

To request a copy of the study, “Adverse Effects of Daylight Saving Time on Adolescents’
Sleep and Vigilance,” or to arrange an interview with the study author or an AASM spokesperson, please contact Communications Coordinator Lynn Celmer at 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, or lcelmer(at)aasmnet(dot)org.

The monthly, peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine is the official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a professional membership society that improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards (http://www.aasmnet.org). The AASM encourages patients to talk to their doctor about sleep problems or visit http://www.sleepeducation.org for a searchable directory of AASM-accredited sleep centers.