Your Guide To Cutting Down On Fats, Salt And Sugar – Part 2

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

saltshakerYou can reduce your sodium intake if you:

1. Cook at home from scratch and reduce the amount of salt you add to dishes.

2. Check labels for sodium in all its forms. Table salt is mainly sodium chloride, but canned or packaged foods can contain other forms of sodium.

3. In the kitchen and at the dinner table, substitute spices, herbs, and salt-free blends for salt.

4. When you do opt for packaged foods, choose products that are sodium free or low in sodium. A typical cup of miso soup, for instance, contains 700 to 900 milligrams of sodium, so look for canned soups with “low sodium” or “reduced sodium” on the label. Bread and cereals carry loads of sodium. Buy the lowest sodium kind you can find and avoid white flour brands.

5. Watch out for salad dressings, ready- made pasta sauces, cup-o-soup products, canned vegetables, frozen pizzas, sausages, pepperoni, canned tuna, and pretty much any food that requires preservation or shelf life.

6. In a restaurant, ask your waiter which dishes are the lowest in sodium and ask of the chef can prepare yours without adding salt.

The overall best approach is to scan the ingredient list before eating or drinking anything. Any ingredient with “sodium” or “Na” — the chemical name for sodium — in its name contains the substance. Sodium might also be labeled as baking soda, baking powder, monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate or salt.

Sugar

Astonishingly, Americans consume an estimated 130 pounds of added sugar per capita annually. That’s about 22 teaspoons daily for adults; roughly 32 teaspoons children (almost three-fourths of a cup). Topping the added-sugar intake list are soft drinks, accounting for 33 percent of added sugar consumed daily.

Overconsumption of added sugar and high-glycemic carbohydrates (like those found in breads, pizza, cold cereals and other baked goods) has been linked to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

One of the most effective things you can do to improve your health is to cut back radically on sugar consumption; in particular, avoid sugared beverages entirely. If this seems overwhelming, taper off slowly – add slightly less sugar to your coffee or tea every day and start by drinking fewer soft drinks per week, etc. You will quickly discover that the craving for sugar dissipates. Foods that once seemed pleasantly sweet begin to taste sickly sweet .

Steer clear of artificial sweeteners – they have chemical components and adverse long term health consequences and the best solution is to choose natural sweeteners like organic raw sugar, maple syrup, or fruit sauces (apple or pear) and cut way back on quantity and portion size.

If you reduce your consumption of Bad saturated fats, salt and sugar you will be on your way to a healthier body, a leaner frame, more energy and you will reduce your risk for heart disease, stroke, obesity and diabetes.

Kac Young has earned three doctorate degrees: a Ph.D in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a spiritual counselor, a teacher, and a licensed Religious Science minister. Her books: “21 Days to the Love of Your Life”; “Discover Your Spiritual Genius”; “Dancing With the Moon,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Gold Mind,” “Heart Easy,” “The Path to Fabulous,” “Cheese Dome Power,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies,” and “Supreme Healing,” are designed to give the reader tools for self improvement.

[1] Conducted by an international team led by Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian of Harvard University’s School of Public Health, was published Aug. 13, 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Your Guide To Cutting Down On Fats, Salt And Sugar – Part 1

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Fats:

healthychoiceThere are two kinds of fats: Good and Bad.

The good guys are unsaturated fats: monounsaturateds (MUFAs), found in foods like olive oil and avocados, and polyunsaturateds (PUFAs), found in sunflower and corn oils, among others, and in the omega-3s in salmon and walnuts. Both types the “good ” title because they’ve been shown to lower blood cholesterol and the risk for heart disease.

The villain, we’ve long been told, is saturated fat. The conventional wisdom, which dates to the 1950s, is that saturated fat, which is present in meat, dairy, and some plant products, increases our total cholesterol and chance for heart disease and stroke. Trans fat, the staple fat that dominates packaged goods and fast food, is another very bad guy: It not only gooses up our LDL cholesterol but also lowers our HDL cholesterol (the kind that helps sweep bad cholesterol out of the body). The American Heart Association recommends limiting your intake of saturated fat to less than 7 percent of your total calories (if you eat 2,000 calories a day, that’s 16 grams, roughly the amount in a chocolate milk shake) and of trans fats to no more than two grams a day. Safest idea is to have NO trans fats per day.

What you can do immediately is swap animal fats for vegetable oils — for instance, using soybean oil or olive oil instead of butter because studies have shown these lower LDL cholesterol levels and disease risk. “Be careful not to replace saturated fats with refined carbs or your triglycerides can go up and your good HDL cholesterol can go down,” explains Alice H. Lichtenstein, the director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University. High triglycerides and low HDL are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and criteria of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health problems linked to heart disease and diabetes.

Salt:

Across the world, the excessive consumption of sodium–hiding in breads, soups and snack foods and beckoning from salt shakers everywhere–is the cause of some 1.65 million deaths by heart disease and strokes yearly, including roughly 667,000 “premature” deaths–those before the age of 70–says a comprehensive new study [1].

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state: ” We all need a small amount (e.g., between about 180 mg and 500 mg per day) of sodium to keep our bodies working properly. But the average daily sodium intake for Americans age 2 years and older is 3,436 mg.”

High sodium consumption raises blood pressure and high blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the nation’s first and third leading causes of death, respectively.

Research shows when salt intake is reduced, blood pressure begins decreasing for most people within a few days to weeks. Populations who consume diets low in salt do not experience the increase in blood pressure with age that is seen in most Western countries.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

Kac Young has earned three doctorate degrees: a Ph.D in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a spiritual counselor, a teacher, and a licensed Religious Science minister. Her books: “21 Days to the Love of Your Life”; “Discover Your Spiritual Genius”; “Dancing With the Moon,” “Feng Shui the Easy Way,” “Gold Mind,” “Heart Easy,” “The Path to Fabulous,” “Cheese Dome Power,” “The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies,” and “Supreme Healing,” are designed to give the reader tools for self improvement.

Taking Care of Your Blood Pressure

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By Nisha Sharma

healthyheartbpBlood Pressure Monitoring

Monitoring blood pressure is important to keep the heart and veins of the body in optimal condition. First, an individual must schedule an appointment with a medical professional to determine if blood pressure is normal. A chronic abnormal blood pressure reading will determine what actions a patient must follow. When a patient visits a physician, several important vital signs assist in determining blood pressure health. Individuals might need to change to a low-sodium diet, increase exercise, lose weight or take daily prescription medication when blood pressure is abnormal.

Routine Physician Visits

Blood pressure is measured on adults with a specialized medical armband device called a sphygmomanometer. The device has mercury that rises to show diastolic and systolic rates. At the same time, a stethoscope is used to listen to heartbeats and respiration rates. Each individual has a variation of blood pressure readings throughout a day due to physical activity, health conditions, medication, diet and emotional stress. Blood pressure readings in combination with the temperature of the body, heartbeats per minute and pulse rates are important tests to determine physical conditions.

Abnormal Blood Pressure Readings

An abnormal blood pressure reading is the result of a chronic, temporary or emergency health condition. Many patients have higher readings due to nervousness while at a medical facility. Additional factors that show temporary abnormal readings are having a full bladder, recent exercise, smoking and consuming caffeine. Individuals with abnormal readings in a medical office setting can purchase a blood pressure monitoring device to check readings throughout a normal day. This is a great way for an individual to care for blood pressure health.

bloodpressureHypotension

Low blood pressure is a dangerous medical condition that causes fainting or dizziness. Emergency hypotension is a result of massive blood loss, hormonal imbalances, infection, toxins or thrombosis. Eating disorders such as bulimia or anorexia nervosa change the chemical balance inside the body while often causing hypotension. A patient in a trauma situation resulting in blood loss can develop a shock condition rapidly. Low blood pressure more commonly occurs as a medical crisis than a chronic health condition.

Hypertension

Hypertension is a chronic condition of high blood pressure that causes the heart muscles to work harder to move blood through the veins and arteries. If an individual routinely has a high blood pressure reading, then arterial hypertension is present. Chronic hypertension damages veins, arteries and heart muscles. Hypertensive patients are more likely to have aneurysms, renal failure, heart attacks or strokes. Individuals with this condition must modify daily lifestyle to reduce blood pressure readings.

Lifestyle Modifications

A nutritious food plan with natural foods low in sodium such as fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein from poultry and whole grains assists in lowering blood pressure. Individuals should consume foods high in calcium, magnesium and potassium. Reducing emotional stress is imperative for hypertensive patients. Individuals can engage in physical activities to improve cardiovascular health and muscle strength. A physician will typically prescribe antihypertensive medication to assist in lowering blood pressure.

– Nisha represents a site called MHA.org.uk. She enjoys writing about elderly healthcare and dementia care.

High Blood Pressure Risk

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From Your Health Journal…..”As I have said before, Everyday Health is one of my favorite web sites on the net for quality health articles. I have been honored to be mentioned in a few of their articles, and always try to send my visitors to their site – like I am today with a great article about high blood pressure. When it comes to high blood pressure, blame may lie beyond stress and the salt shaker: Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found that those earning the lowest wages have a higher risk of hypertension than workers earning the highest wages. For years, we have always learned to reduce stress and the salt, but you cannot reduce your job – so those earning less money have to stay with their jobs, as there is no place else for them to go! Please visit the Everyday Health web site (link provided below) to read the complete story.”

From the article…..

When it comes to high blood pressure, blame may lie beyond stress and the salt shaker: Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found that those earning the lowest wages have a higher risk of hypertension than workers earning the highest wages.

The correlation between low wages and hypertension was especially strong for women, and for men and women between the ages of 25 to 44, according to a press release.

The researchers were surprised that low wages were such a strong risk factor for these two populations, especially since hypertension is more typically linked with being older and male.

“Our outcome shows that women and younger employees working at the lowest pay scales should be screened regularly for hypertension as well,” said J. Paul Leigh, PhD, lead author of the study.

The research team used data from 5,651 households with working adults between 25 and 65 years of age that included information on wages, employment, and health, including hypertension. The team looked at heads of household and their spouses for three time periods: 1999 to 2001, 2001 to 2003, and 2003 to 2005.

Wages were calculated as annual income from all sources divided by work hours, and ranged from about $2.38 to $77 per hour in 1999. Hypertension was self-reported by respondents.

According to the data analysis, doubling the wage level was associated with a 16 percent decrease in the risk of a hypertension diagnosis. Doubling the wage level also reduced the risk of hypertension by 1.2 percent over two years and 0.6 percent for one year.

But the risk decrease was most apparent in women and younger workers. Doubling the wages of workers between 25 and 44 years old was associated with a 25 percent to 30 percent decrease in the risk of hypertension. Doubling the wages of women was associated with a 30 percent to 35 percent decrease in hypertension risk.

To read the full article…..Click here

Salt And Blood Pressure

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From Your Health Journal…..”I found a great web site today called LankaWeb, please go check it out (link below) – they have some great material. They have an article today that I am reviewing called The relationship between salt and blood pressure. The amount of salt you eat has a direct effect on your blood pressure. Salt makes your body holds more water. If you eat too much salt, the extra water stored in your body raises your blood pressure. So, the more salt you eat, higher the blood pressure. This puts more pressure on your heart. Please visit the web site to read the complete article (link below) – it makes some excellent points, and very educational.”

From the article…..

When it comes to eating and drinking during the holidays, it’s easy to over indulge with some of your favourite traditional meals, desserts and drinks. A few lucky people have gone back to Sri Lanka during this time of the year to see the parents, families and friends with lots of presents to celebrate Christmas and New Year. They find any excuse to eat and drink such as Christmas then New Year. Once you are there, very likely you will be invited to too many places for lunches, dinners, weddings, birthday parties and for weekend get together. Another important thing to keep in mind is that it’s not the food that matters, but rather the friends and family you eat it with. Unless you control yourself the eager not to over indulge in eating and drinking, no one else can do.

The amount of salt you eat has a direct effect on your blood pressure. Salt makes your body holds more water. If you eat too much salt, the extra water stored in your body raises your blood pressure. So, the more salt you eat, higher the blood pressure.

That means higher the blood pressure, greater the strain on your heart, arteries, kidneys and the brain. The medical reports say, “This excess salt intake can lead you to heart attack, strokes, dementia and kidney problems.” Did you know that 80% of the salt you eat everyday is “hidden” in the processed foods you eat? The processed food packets have clearly marked about salt but many people unlikely read the ingredients, just ignore if the price is right.

Osmosis can be defined as the movement of water across a semi-permeable membrane from a region of high water concentration to a region of low water concentration. The semi-permeable membrane allows small particles through it but does not allow large particles such as sodium chloride. When there is excess salt in the blood, water enters the blood due to osmosis that means the water content increases the volume of blood. Osmosis will continue until a state of equilibrium is reached i.e. there is no area with a higher or lower concentration than another area. No wonder one feels so thirsty when one eats salty food such as crisps, salted cashew nuts and peanuts.

To read the full article…..Click here