Iowa Researcher Awarded 2015 ACSM-AMSSM Clinical Research Grant

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This article is courtesy of ACSM, please share your comments below…..

didyouknow?M. Kyle Smoot, MD, is the 2015 recipient of the ACSM Foundation-AMSSM Foundation Clinical Research Grant for his research titled, “The relationship between muscle damage and acute kidney injury biomarkers in American football players during preseason workouts.”

The latest in a series of collaborative projects between the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the joint Clinical Research Grant Committee selects a single proposal to receive a $20,000 award. This is the 3rd year of the partnership for the annual joint clinical research grant awards. “The grant review committee is pleased to award funding for Dr. Smoot’s research proposal that will investigate new serum markers of acute kidney injury in athletes,” said Suzanne Hecht, M.D., who chaired the joint organization review committee. “This research has the potential to play a role in the management of the athlete with suspected rhadomyolysis along with other possible applications.”

Dr. Smoot is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, where he also serves as the Program Director for its sports medicine fellowship program. He has conducted research on adequacy of pre-participation cardiovascular screening in NCAA collegiate athletes, concussion protocol for student athletes and assessment of muscle damage in asymptomatic football players during strenuous activity. He received his medical degree from Wright State University School of Medicine in Dayton, OH, residency at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and completed a primary care sports medicine fellowship at UK.

The primary purpose of the ACSMF-AMSSMF Clinical Research Grant Award is to foster original scientific investigations with a strong clinical focus among physician members of ACSM and AMSSM. A secondary intent of the grant program is to foster the development of the principal investigator’s research education by requiring that a portion of the funds to be applied to meet this goal. The review committee sought research proposals that investigate research questions within the broad discipline of sports medicine. The criteria required proposals to be led by physicians who are members of both ACSM and AMSSM.

Researcher: Chowing Down On Watermelon Could Lower Blood Pressure

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watermelonBe sure to pick up a watermelon — or two — at your neighborhood farmers’ market.

It could save your life.

A new study by Florida State University Associate Professor Arturo Figueroa, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, found that watermelon could significantly reduce blood pressure in overweight individuals both at rest and while under stress.

“The pressure on the aorta and on the heart decreased after consuming watermelon extract,” Figueroa said.

The study started with a simple concept. More people die of heart attacks in cold weather because the stress of the cold temperatures causes blood pressure to increase and the heart has to work harder to pump blood into the aorta. That often leads to less blood flow to the heart.

Thus, people with obesity and high blood pressure face a higher risk for stroke or heart attack when exposed to the cold either during the winter or in rooms with low temperatures.

So, what might help their hearts?

It turned out that watermelon may be part of the answer.

Figueroa’s 12-week study focused on 13 middle-aged, obese men and women who also suffered from high blood pressure. To simulate cold weather conditions, one hand of the subject was dipped into 39 degree water (or 4 degrees Celsius) while Figueroa’s team took their blood pressure and other vital measurements.

Meanwhile, the group was divided into two. For the first six weeks, one group was given four grams of the amino acid L-citrulline and two grams of L-arginine per day, both from watermelon extract. The other group was given a placebo for 6 weeks.

Then, they switched for the second six weeks.

Participants also had to refrain from taking any medication for blood pressure or making any significant changes in their lifestyle, particularly related to diet and exercise, during the study.

The results showed that consuming watermelon had a positive impact on aortic blood pressure and other vascular parameters.

Notably, study participants showed improvements in blood pressure and cardiac stress while both at rest and while they were exposed to the cold water.

“That means less overload to the heart, so the heart is going to work easily during a stressful situation such as cold exposure,” Figueroa said.

Figueroa has conducted multiple studies on the benefits of watermelon. In the past, he examined how it impacts post-menopausal women’s arterial function and the blood pressure readings of adults with pre-hypertension.

– Submitted by Florida State University News