Q & A: Losing Weight & Keeping It Off

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By Dr. Michael Wald

qa1. Have you attempted more than two weight loss programs with no significant long-term results?

ANSWER: If you answered YES, you may have undiscovered hormonal issues, toxicity problems and/or a sluggish metabolism not revealed by standard blood tests.

2. True or False: Metabolic rate is the only influence on weight loss?

ANSWER: False: Nutritional deficiencies, mal-absorption and the RIGHT exercise plan are all potentially important.

3. What do the popular weight loss programs all have in common?

ANSWER: They are not based on your metabolic rate, medications you might be taking that affect weight loss and metabolism, your particular dietary and nutritional needs and/or other health problems.

4. Which of the following are not considered meaningful exercise efforts for weight loss in the long-terms?

a. “Running around” doing errands all day

b. Consistent stationary bike and/or treadmill for 45 minutes three days per week

c. Weight training three or four days per week

d. All of the following may be inadequate

ANSWER: D. If you currently are not satisfied with your weight, and you are “running around”, biking or doing the treadmill for 45 minutes, 3 days per week, and weight training 3-4 days, then ALL ARE INADEQUATE weight loss efforts! Proper exercise MUST ACTUALLY WORK, not just seem like it is appropriate. If you are exercising and not getting the results you want, individualization and “changing things up” is needed.

5. Which of the following are true regarding PERMANENT WEIGHT LOSS?

a. Finding out your metabolic rate and increasing it (however necessary)

b. Determining your nutritional imbalances through blood and/or urine or other evaluations?

c. Considering other health issues that you might have or genetic issues not fully appreciated in other weight loss programs

ANSWER: All of the above are true.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Q & A: So, Your Lab Work Is Normal – NOT!

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By Dr. Michael Wald

qa1. True or false? When your doctor tells you that your blood work is “perfectly normal”, even though you do not feel well, is it “all in your head”?

ANSWER: False. Your lab work may be “normal”, but your doctor’s lab workup may be incomplete, limited to his/her medical specialty, misinterpreted, or may not compare you to a “healthy” population as opposed to a “normal” population.

2. True or False: A blood sugar (glucose) of 65-110 mg/dL, found on a typical lab test, represents the “average” of a “normal” person in a population and not necessarily your “healthy” range?

ANSWER: True. The ranges for all tests you find on the lab are based on averages and may not represent “optimal ranges” for “healthy people.” This is not surprising as these ranges were designed to detect “disease” and not necessarily earlier problems that may be “hidden within the normal ranges of lab values.”

Bottom line – If you are not feeling well, and your doctor says that your test results are normal, maybe you are being compared to the wrong population of people (namely the “average”and not “healthy”).

3. True or False? Because of your health issues, you’re under the impression that you’ve seen the top specialist on the planet and they have done “every test you can imagine.”

ANSWER: This is something that our patients say quite often to us. Unfortunately, we often find that many essential tests and health issues are simply not considered. Why is this? Each specialist “specializes” and therefore does not consider your health issues in the context of multiple systems, spanning multiple medical specialties (not to mention, natural health care specialties) all at once.

4. Which of the following is true regarding the best way to read your blood for nutritional deficiencies and balances and excesses?

a) Measure the blood levels of various vitamins such as vitamins D, E and A for example.

b) Measuring the level of vitamins and comparing it with a dietary log.

c) Measuring levels of vitamins, examining dietary intake, but also performing tests of nutritional utilization and absorption.

d) Performing non-blood tests that have nutritional significance plus everything in choice above considered in the context of a medical health and nutritional history.

ANSWER: D

SPECIAL NOTE: Dr. Michael Wald of Integrated Medicine is the “Original Blood Detective.” He invented a software program that compares your lab work to healthy and not nearly average people as part of a complete work up. The Results often find the hidden issues that have caused many years of lost quality of life and increased disease risk.

– Listen to Dr. Michael Wald’s audio show, Blood Detective for more information about this topic. Call and ask for a free copy of Blood Detective Radio Shows. Thirteen hours of natural health care secrets. QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR HEALTH? Call Integrated Medicine & Nutrition at 914-242-8844 or visit www.intmedny.com

Q & A: Keeping Kids Healthy

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Q & A with Dr. Michael Wald

cutekids1. True or False: Decreasing the intake of refined and processed sugar during childhood decreases the risk of chronic diseases later in life?

ANSWER: True. Poor quality nutrition during childhood, particularly during the first ten years, sets the stage for developing cavities, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and headaches now, and chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and diabetes later in life.

2. True or False: Restriction of fats intake during childhood contributes to optimal growth and reduces the risk of obesity in adulthood?

ANSWER: True and False. Saturated fats should not exceed 5% of the total diet; the remainder containing roughly equal amounts of mono- and polyunsaturated fats. Fats are needed for brain function and development, tissue growth, hormone production and disease protection. Best sources are mercury-free omega 3 oils from fish, flax, algae (high DHA) and unprocessed grains for omega 6 oils.

3. What minerals are often lacking in the diets of children and adolescents?

A. Copper, manganese, magnesium

B. Iron, calcium, zinc

C. Selenium, iron, chromium

D. Zinc, potassium, sodium

ANSWER: B. Iron, calcium, zinc: low iron can contribute to learning disabilities, fatigue and “growing pains”; calcium is needed for bone growth, blood clotting and nervous system health; zinc is required for hinking, tissue repair and immunity.

4. Requirements for which vitamins peak during adolescent and teenage years?

A. Biotin, folic acid, vitamin K, B5

B. Vitamin C, vitamin A, B6, Niacin

C. Thiamin, biotin, vitamin A, B12

D. Folic acid, B6, B12, vitamin C

ANSWER: D. Requirements for B vitamins increase with increasing energy needs for growth and mental function. A diet containing a variety of fruits and vegetables should be consumed. Furthermore, a balanced supplement containing a mixture of these vitamins is important, especially for a child who eats poorly (i.e., juicing of fruits and/or vegetables with dehydrated powered supplements added for optimal nutrition).

5. Keeping your kids healthy consists of?

A. Adequate sleep

B. Adequate water intake

C. Reduce processed/junk food

D. Develop good eating habits

E. Relaxation and a manageable schedule

F. All of the above

ANSWER: E. All of the above.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Q & A: Juice Fasting: Myths & Benefits

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Q & A with Dr. Michael Wald

fruitswhite1. True or False: Fasting with vegetable juices will provide all one needs for effective elimination of toxins?

ANSWER: False. There are countless toxins and many require very specific nutrients or medications to eliminate them. Even if juices contain the necessary nutrient compounds, the dosages might not be enough. Only testing of the toxin(s) in question and retesting will reveal if juicing efforts were/are effective.

2. True or False: Vegetable juice fasting is appropriate for everyone?

ANSWER: False. Allergies, digestive problems, medications, adrenal gland weakness, blood sugar problems and thyroid issues, among a few, can undermine the appropriateness of juice fasting.

3. True or False: Juice fasting can slow down one’s thyroid function?

ANSWER: Maybe. If you have an undiscovered slow thyroid (such as Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis or nonautoimmunelow thyroid), cruciferous veggies added to juicing can further aggravate juice fasting efforts.

4. True or False: There is a way to idealize juicing recipes for each person?

ANSWER: Absolutely. Knowledge of health history, food reactions (allergies) and nutritional deficiencies
(revealed upon blood and urine testing), can help uncover information that can be used to idealize juice fasting ingredient combinations.

5. True or False: Water fasting, for the purpose of detox-elimination, is always a good idea?

ANSWER: False. Water fasting is almost never appropriate as water is devoid of antioxidants and other
nutrients absolutely required for the detox-elimination processes.

6. True or False: Headache, muscle aches and pains and fatigue, when experienced during a juice detox always mean one is experiencing a “Clearing (or Cleansing) Reaction”?

ANSWER: False. These symptoms and others could mean that the detox process is proceeding, but may also mean that the detox process has gone awry.

7. True or False: The best way to know if your juice detox is working is that you feel great?

ANSWER: False. In fact, if you feel great the juicing detox may not be moving forward at all. A combination of blood/urine testing as well as how you feel is the best way to know if juicing is working.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Q & A: Immunity

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Q & A with Dr. Michael Wald

qa1. Which of the following comprises your immune system?

a. Your white blood cells (wbc’s), aka Cell-Mediated Immune System

b. Your lymphoid tissue

c. Your immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgE), aka Humeral Immune System

d. All of the above

ANSWER: All of the above, and more, comprise your immune SYSTEM!

2. True or False: Herbs such as Echinacea, goldenseal and Astragalus increase immunity?

ANSWER: True and False. These herbs are known as biological-response modifiers. If your immune system is low they will increase it; if your immune system is high it will decrease it.

3. True or False: 60-70% of your immune system is located in your small intestine?

ANSWER: True. The GI tract comprises the majority of the immune system within what is known as, The Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue. Remember This – To balance your immune system you must maximize your nutrition. First, you need to test (i.e., blood work) your various immune systems and provide the specific balance of lifestyle factors including herbs and various nutritional supplements to kick it into high
gear!

4. True or False: As we age, our immune system(s) can both increase and decrease at the same time?

ANSWER: True. The cell-mediated immune system (the white blood cells) often decreases with aging while the humeral immune system (immunoglobulins) increases; this increase is sometimes called autoimmune disease.

5. Which of the following nutritional compounds can potentially improve (balance) immunity?

a. Ginseng

b. Testosterone

c. Plant proteins

d. Glandular supplements (i.e., thymus, intestine, spleen, liver, etc.)

e. NAC

f. Vitamin C

ANSWER: All of these can help balance protein. Here is a partial explanation – Ginseng, a group of adaptogenic herbs, powerfully modifies cell-mediated immunity. Testosterone is essential for all aspects of immunity and is anti-infectious. Plant proteins are essential for both the cell-mediated and humeral immune systems. Glandulars reduce autoimmune processes by affecting the humeral immune system. NAC is a precursor to a powerful immune modulating substance known as glutathione. Vitamin C modifies both the cell and humeral immune systems.

6. True or False: Consuming immune modifying nutritional compounds is always safe?

ANSWER: False – Immune modulating nutrients always have other effects and may have adverse effects. Their use should be based on physical signs and symptoms, lab work, medications, other nutrients and other factors.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Q & A: What is Holistic Medicine?

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Q & A with Dr. Michael Wald

informationred1. Is there a difference between the terms holistic, alternative, complimentary, integrated and natural healthcare?

Answer: Yes. Although there are no universally decided upon definitions of these terms, here are some reasonable definitions:

a.) Holistic – Holistic implies that the practitioner is open-minded towards a variety of healing modalities no matter where they come from (i.e., from traditional medicine or natural medicine). However, many holistic practitioners consider themselves holistic even though they only practice natural medicine and do not ever refer to medical doctors.

b.) Alternative – This term commonly implies that the practitioner and his/her approaches are not found in mainstream medicine and are therefore considered alternative. These approaches are considered “not medically necessary” or “not approved” by allopathic mainstream physicians or insurance companies.

c.) Complimentary medicine – A more vague term implying that the healing methods/philosophies of the practitioner include at least some traditional medical approaches along with natural approaches.

d.) Integrated – Integrated medicine is our personal favorite, which is why we call ourselves “Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco”. For us, integrated means the intelligent and balanced consideration of any form of healing method that is available; choosing the safest, most effective methods for each individual patient in the context of their belief system. Whether it is from allopathic medicine, Chinese medicine,
Ayurveda, American herbal medicine, diet, prescription medications, imaging modalities and/or diet, etc. Testing is also utilized to develop individualized treatments.

e.) Natural – Natural medicine implies that the practitioner uses healing methods that are completely natural based on diet and common nutritional supplements – in other words, whatever is found or made from nature and is not a prescription drug.

2. Is there a difference among the knowledge and education of various types of “nutritional” practitioners such as dieticians, clinical nutritionists, certified clinical nutritionists, certified nutritional specialists, board certified nutritionists and nutritional counselors?

Answer: The educational degree is certainly not the only factor that determines the nutritional competency of a practitioner. Their education does offer an opportunity for the practitioner to be exposed to information, which he or she may take to heart and deliver in a clinically effective way. At Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, our practitioners have a combination of practically every major degree in nutrition available. Dr. Michael Wald is perhaps the most highly qualified “nutritionist” in the United States with a medical education, a chiropractic degree, a certified clinical nutritionist degree, a certified nutrition specialist degree, two board certifications in nutrition, a Master’s degree in nutrition as well as other qualifications. Go to www.intmedny.com for more information.

3. Is a nutritionist qualified to order and perform laboratory work?

Answer: No. Nutritionists, in no program that we are aware of in the United States, receive any formal training in laboratory assessment. Laboratory assessment is highly complex and requires knowledge of body systems, physiology and biochemistry that is generally well beyond the scope of standard nutrition educational programs. A nutritionist who is not working with a qualified practitioner who can read
laboratory work, like our own “Blood Detectives”, should not order and/or offer to interpret laboratory work including blood typing. Please read under the Services section on our Blood Detective website for more information on our philosophy towards improving health through individualized nutritional and diet suggestions based upon your unique biochemistry.

4. Are the opinions of standard medical doctors of value in the area of nutrition?

Answer: Our experience says no. The average MD in the US has four (4) hours of nutritional education and it is superficial at best. A weekend course also does not make an MD qualified to give nutritional advice or to necessarily criticize unfamiliar nutritional approaches.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Q & A: Test Your Knowledge About Heavy Metals

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Q & A with Dr. Michael Wald

qa1. Which of the following is not a heavy metal?

a. Mercury

b. Aluminum

c. Lead d. Tin

e. Arsenic

ANSWER: Arsenic

2. True or False: Drinking 2-4 green vegetable drinks per day will effectively remove heavy metals from the body?

ANSWER: False. Various antidotes (detoxifier) are required to remove different metals and toxins

3. True or False: All three major forms of mercury are detoxified from the body the same way?

ANSWER: False. A combination of chelators (substances that remove heavy metals) is necessary to remove mercury in its various forms.

4. True or False: Headache, fatigue and muscle aches are some symptoms which can results during the process of heavy metal and toxin removal and always mean that the detoxification process is working.

ANSWER: False. These symptoms could also mean that adverse organ responses are occurring.

5. True or False: Mercury levels are best checked in blood?

ANSWER: False: Mercury from fish is best checked in urine, but all three major forms of mercury are best checked in a variety of tissue samples including urine, plasma and red blood cells. Failure to check all three of these tissues will result in inadequate total body mercury burden assessment.

6. True of False: Hair analysis is a reliable test of heavy metal toxicity in organs?

ANSWER: False: Hair analysis may not be as reliable as other types of toxin testing and does not reflect organ burdens.

7. Some findings on blood work that might indicate a predisposition to heavy metal burden include which of the following:

a. Low or low normal chloride

b. Low or low normal uric acid

c. High IgM

ANSWER: All can indicate heavy metal body burdens

8. True or False: “Free metals”, metals not bound with proteins, are the forms of metals which are responsible for tissue damage and symptoms?

ANSWER: True. Urine free metals assessment may indicate toxic burdens.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.