Meditation: Healing The Scars From Child Abuse, Domestic Violence, PTSD And More – Part 2

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By Tom North, author of True North: The Shocking Truth About “Yours, Mine and Ours”

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

yogaposeIn my own experience, and in the experience of many meditators who have been culturing a daily meditation practice over time, the ongoing result has been a steadily growing expansion of awareness and appreciation for all of life. This takes the form of improved relationships with those around me, connection with the entire human race and seeing the divine intelligence in the simplest life forms.

I would be remiss if I didn’t include experiencing an overwhelming sense of love for everyone and everything I encounter. As one friend and former college classmate of mine said, “I was stopped in commuter traffic on the 405 freeway in L.A. I looked around me at the thousands of cars and people and was feeling an unbounded love for all of them!”

If this is the outcome of consistent meditation, then it certainly is worth trying for anyone whose long-ago trauma-related or trauma-triggered emotions frequently get the better of them. For those who simply cannot see their way out of their own personal darkness, meditation is even more important. I encourage you to make the commitment.

8 Steps to Help You Develop Your Daily Meditation Practice for Trauma Healing

* Give yourself permission to get better, understanding that meditation can provide healing and relief.

* Seek out a meditation teacher. Meditation is like walking in an unfamiliar forest. It is best to have a guide.

* Commit to regularity. Research shows that 20 minutes twice a day is optimal.

* Create a space that is just for you to meditate each day. Unplug the phone(s) and put your silenced cell phone where you cannot see it. No cheating!

* Get your mediation checked regularly by your teacher. This is very important.

* If you absolutely have to miss a session, do not be hard on yourself – it is OK to renegotiate with yourself, recommit and pick up where you left off.

* Wait two months, and then check in on your memories of pain and trauma…do you feel better able to just let them go, to allow them to NOT MATTER anymore?

* Congratulate yourself for staying with it! You’re on your way to true healing.

*Disclaimer: Please remember that meditation is not a substitute for professional care or psychiatric help if that is what is needed. Many physicians and psychologists recommend meditation in conjunction with standard therapies.

– Tom North is the author of True North – The Shocking Truth About “Yours, Mine and Ours” They appeared to be the blissful Beardsleys, the happily blended family-eight of Helen North’s, ten of Frank Beardsley’s, and two children from their union. A family so famous in America that Lucille Ball and Henry Fonda played the parents in the box office smash–Yours Mine and Ours. But they were anything from blissful; in fact they were the beaten and battered Beardsleys. That’s the real hidden story behind the spotlight. And Tom North, Helen’s second eldest son, is now revealing how he survived the ordeal of living with a horrifyingly abusive stepfather that drove him to depression and drugs, and deprived him of his self-worth-and a mother who protected the image of the “perfect” family at all costs. But True North is much more than an inspiring and powerful account of a man who rose to success against all odds. It’s a story of how Transcendental Meditation (TM) brought peace to Tom North and saved his life. It brings to light how effective meditation is as a means for healing trauma survivors and especially those who have endured any form of verbal, physical or sexual abuse. For more information, go to truenorthbytomnorth.com/

Meditation: Healing The Scars From Child Abuse, Domestic Violence, PTSD And More – Part 1

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By Tom North, author of True North: The Shocking Truth About “Yours, Mine and Ours”

Meditation saved my life.

yogaMy father, Richard North, died in a Navy jet test flight crash when I was six years old. Fifteen months after his death, my mother, Helen North who had eight children, re-married a man named Frank Beardsley who had ten, making us one of the largest families in the country. We became famous, and our story was featured in the movie, Yours, Mine and Ours. But it wasn’t one big happy family. We had to hide the fact that we were living a lie.

My stepfather was abusive on every level; physically, emotionally and sexually. His constant rage, disapproval and controlling personality left deep emotional scars. And, to make matters worse, our family hid this from the outside world, so we each suffered in silence. The toll I paid was enormous. Lacking any sense of self-worth, it drove me to depression and drugs. I imagine many people will identify with the feelings, even if their home life was not as extreme as mine. But trauma is trauma–whether suffered in a living room or the theatre of war.

As a young adult I discovered meditation. It was my passage out of a deep depression and emotional despair, and I’m here to recommend it as a powerful and effective solution if you cannot get out of the mental patterns that keep you stuck, feeling a victim of past trauma.

Meditation was and still is a vital therapy for my continued survival and healing from a life of child abuse and domestic violence. I still practice it every day, having begun more than 38 years ago.

Meditation is indeed a powerful tool for health and healing on all levels. Research shows that group meditation can produce a radiating influence of peace in society. Recently, Dr. Deepak Chopra sponsored and conducted an online Global Group Meditation for Peace with over 100,000 people participating from around the world. I was happy to be a part of this important event.

This was a tremendous service Dr. Chopra was delivering to the audience, for as he explained, meditation is the key to our connection with ourselves: Our Divine Selves. It is also our connection to the collective consciousness. Studies show that everything in the universe is connected and it is possible to unite people in heart-focused care and intention to facilitate the shift in global consciousness from instability and discord to balance, cooperation and enduring peace.

The Health Benefits of Daily Meditation are Many

The scientific evidence documenting the benefits of Transcendental Meditation, especially for PTSD, which includes child abuse, is conclusive. While there may always be skeptics, it is irrefutable that meditation delivers improvements on every level of life, from stress management to emotional, physical and spiritual balance.

Dr. Norman Rosenthal, senior research scientist at the National Institute of Health (NIH), has published his studies of over 300 experiments that prove the importance and benefits of meditation. This is in addition to the many thousands of published reports that have become available over the last 40 years that have come out of Maharishi University of Management, Harvard University and many others.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Tom North is the author of True North – The Shocking Truth About “Yours, Mine and Ours” They appeared to be the blissful Beardsleys, the happily blended family-eight of Helen North’s, ten of Frank Beardsley’s, and two children from their union. A family so famous in America that Lucille Ball and Henry Fonda played the parents in the box office smash–Yours Mine and Ours. But they were anything from blissful; in fact they were the beaten and battered Beardsleys. That’s the real hidden story behind the spotlight. And Tom North, Helen’s second eldest son, is now revealing how he survived the ordeal of living with a horrifyingly abusive stepfather that drove him to depression and drugs, and deprived him of his self-worth-and a mother who protected the image of the “perfect” family at all costs. But True North is much more than an inspiring and powerful account of a man who rose to success against all odds. It’s a story of how Transcendental Meditation (TM) brought peace to Tom North and saved his life. It brings to light how effective meditation is as a means for healing trauma survivors and especially those who have endured any form of verbal, physical or sexual abuse. For more information, go to truenorthbytomnorth.com/

Look For PTSD Symptoms In Stroke Victims

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By Richard Ueberfluss

heartshinyAlthough post-traumatic stress disorder is associated with retuning veterans, a new study published in the journal PLoS ONE found that people who develop PTSD after a stroke could have a greater risk for heart problems or another stroke because of the psychological issues they endure.

Reporter Barbara Bronson Gray, writing for HealthDay, found that the researchers “discovered that patients who develop a serious health condition followed by intense treatment may have mental problems that frequently go unrecognized by physicians and family members. PTSD is an intense physical and emotional response to a life-threatening or traumatic event. The symptoms fall into three broad types: reliving the event, avoiding usual activities and hyperarousal, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

Bronson warned that “unlike a soldier who can leave the battlefield, stroke patients typically return to the place where the crisis occurred. Many patients may simply see the living room chair where they had the stroke and immediately feel PTSD symptoms.
Flashbacks, nightmares, palpitations, chills, and elevated heart rate and blood pressure may occur for months or years after their return home.”

If you are caring for a loved one that has experienced a stroke, monitor their behavior to determine if they exhibit any unusual behavior. A home care company can provide an aide to keep company with the loved one and try to minimize any anxiety –they are trained to seek medical intervention if they suspect a patient’s condition has worsened.

As medical science studies stroke victims they are finding ways to detect strokes early and treat them, but also that strokes can present challenges beyond the initial incident.

– Richard Ueberfluss is a certified physical therapist and president of Assisting Hands-Chicago. He can be reached at this web site.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) – Poetry Can Heal Fat And Negativity

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By Risa Ruse

saladplateI am sure that you may have heard the saying, “We are what we eat.” I would like to add to this, “We are what we eat, and think!” You see thoughts are like food for the mind. The quality of such can bring good health or just the opposite in illness and disease. I would even go further to say it could lead to suicide. Even though eating disorders are not what I am focusing on (but are relevant) to the wanting to fill one up when the soul feels empty. Just for the record, my mother committed suicide when I was 11 years old. I had to witness her unhappiness (and several attempts before being successful in failing to enjoy life.)

This emptiness can show itself in feelings of not being worthy (even if we have had a normal life, per say.) It is the perception of self that determines these feelings that become our “reality” whether others perceive the same thing or not. Such disorders given to anxiety exhibit an exaggeration of what a person without anxiety, or even Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may perceive. Just being able to enjoy the simple things in life becomes a

Just being able to enjoy the simple things in life becomes a masterful plan of self-loathing that leads to addictions of many kinds.

masterful plan of self-loathing that leads to addictions of many kinds. Compulsive buying, eating comfort foods, sexual promiscuity (that may lead to or include lasciviousness.) This feeling of lack in our lives creates a wanting that is never satisfied. Sure, buying a new CD, dress, car, (or whatever our credit report will allow us to charge) will give a feeling of elation. This is not the same as joy. Joy is an emotion void of negativity. That is unless you really have a problem with life, and get joy out of making others miserable!

What I would like to share is a process in rhyme that comes from the divine that I have been able to coin; that is not like other poetry used for catharsis. You see, many persons that include Veterans use poetry as a means of expressing negative emotions that proliferate negative thinking. My poetry is inspired through my connection with my Higher Power (Christ is mine.) When I say a prayer, what is in my heart comes out in the form of rhyme that addresses a particular emotion (that is actually cleansed during the process.) I, and others who have heard it are left with a feeling of knowing exactly what was expressed and have a way of putting a new label on what emotional discomforts they are carrying. Since these are universal emotions of mostly anger and fear, we are not repeating any particular traumatic event (that would give negative thinking strength.) This kind of poetry is like a match igniting our spirituality. Once this flame is lit and we follow the required commitments to it, our lives change.

heartYou may be thinking right now, “What are these requirements?” The first is to express gratitude for even the little things in our lives. Giving thanks proliferates acquiring the ultimate gift of joy! The others are magnified with blessings when performed in prayer and meditation. Then prayer leads to faith, and once that is accompanied by trusting Eternal Spirit to provide our every need, comfort and healing comes.

– Want to know more about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Contact me for a free inspired poetry consult. As an experienced Social Worker skilled in Veterans PTSD, victim turned victor twice of PTSD (once as a child losing my mother to suicide and then as a mother) I share the healing of negative emotions (one or two at a time in rhyme) that make it a safe place to heal. I share my books and my poetry articles on my website: http://RisaRuse.com