New Study Shows Combatting Childhood Obesity In Schools Is Working

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obesityResearch Finds the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program Reduces Prevalence of Childhood Obesity.

According to a recently published study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal, Preventing Chronic Disease, schools can win the fight against childhood obesity. The study found that the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program is an important means of supporting schools in reducing students’ rates of obesity.

Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in California Schools, 2006 – 2012, is the first peer-reviewed journal article published about the Healthy Schools Program’s impact on child obesity rates.

An analysis of 281 schools in California that participated in the Program from 2006-2012 concludes that the Program is “an effective model for addressing childhood obesity among engaged schools,” and that meaningful participation in the Program is linked to reductions in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among students in high-need schools.

Ten years ago, the Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association founded the Alliance for a Healthier Generation with the goal of reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity, and this study confirms the organization is delivering on its mission and that healthy school environments are having an effect on student weight.

“It’s encouraging to see the proven positive impact of the Healthy Schools Program on childhood obesity. Over the past ten years, the Alliance involved all stakeholders ‒ schools, companies, communities, healthcare professionals and families. The combination of commitment and cooperation has made the difference,” said President Bill Clinton.

kidsexercisevector“This study is evidence of our 2005 dream realized. While we know we have much more work to do to reverse the tide of obesity, we’re showing signs of success through the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.

The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program, which was launched in 2006 with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provides schools with a framework, assessment and action plan, as well as virtual and onsite training and technical assistance and access to national experts to help them create sustainable healthy change. While the study looked at schools in California, the Program serves more than 29,000 schools nationally, the majority of which are high-need ‒ 40% or more of a school’s students receive free or reduced price lunch.

The study demonstrates the power of providing high-quality training and technical assistance to help schools make policy and system changes that improve children’s access to healthy foods and physical activity. The more that schools engaged with the Healthy Schools Program, and the longer they engaged, the greater reductions they saw in student rates of obesity. For example, for each additional year of exposure to an Alliance national advisor, schools saw a nearly 2% decline in student rates of overweight and obesity.

“Healthy school environments are critical to ensuring that every child grows up at a healthy weight and to RWJF’s goal of building a nationwide Culture of Health,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “This study reinforces the critical role that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program can play in making a healthy school the norm and not the exception in the United States. We are proud of our commitment to initiate and expand the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program over the past decade, and we look forward to continued progress in our joint efforts to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic.”

“We’re pleased the findings confirm that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program is delivering on our mission: to reduce the prevalence of childhood obesity,” said Dr. Howell Wechsler, CEO of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. “Reaching more than 17 million students across the country and growing, we will continue to positively impact children’s health on a national scale.”

About the Alliance for a Healthier Generation
The Alliance for a Healthier Generation empowers kids to develop lifelong, healthy habits. Through our Healthy Schools Program, we help to build healthier school environments for more than 17 million students by improving physical education, health education, child nutrition, and staff wellness policies and programs in more than 29,000 schools. Learn more and join the movement at http://www.healthiergeneration.org.

About the Clinton Foundation
The Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change. Because of our work, more than 29,000 American schools are providing kids with healthy food choices in an effort to eradicate childhood obesity; more than 85,000 farmers in Malawi, Rwanda, and Tanzania are benefiting from climate-smart agronomic training, higher yields, and increased market access; more than 33,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions are being reduced annually across the United States; over 350,000 people have been impacted through market opportunities created by social enterprises in Latin America, the Caribbean, and South Asia; through the independent Clinton Health Access Initiative, 9.9 million people in more than 70 countries have access to CHAI-negotiated prices for HIV/AIDS medications; 75 million people are benefiting from disease prevention efforts and investments in the U.S.; and members of the Clinton Global Initiative community have made more than 3,200 Commitments to Action, which have improved the lives of over 430 million people in more than 180 countries. Learn more at http://www.clintonfoundation.org, on Facebook at Facebook.com/ClintonFoundation and on Twitter @ClintonFdn.

About the American Heart Association
The American Heart Association (AHA) is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke—America’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers. The American Heart Association team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of the offices around the country.

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
For more than 40 years the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has worked to improve health and health care. The Foundation strives to build a national Culture of Health that will enable all to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come. For more information, visit http://www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter at http://www.rwjf.org/twitter or on Facebook at http://www.rwjf.org/facebook.

New Asthma & Obesity Study Tracks 10,000 Patients

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didyouknow?Asthma Control Requires Weight Loss Management in At-Risk Individuals

Although studies have shown an association between obesity and increased asthma incidence, the role of obesity in asthma control is less clear. Now, researchers have addressed that issue by tracking asthma control and Body Mass Index (BMI) in a large, real world cohort of 10,233 adults.

“We identified adults with persistent asthma in 2006, continuous health plan enrollment in 2007 and 2008, with a BMI measurement in 2006 and 2007. That BMI was categorized and analyzed alongside asthma control outcomes in 2008,” co-author Michael Schatz, MD, MS, FAAAAI, said.

Asthma control outcomes included asthma hospitalizations or emergency department visits, oral corticosteroid prescriptions linked to an asthma encounter and prescriptions for more than seven short-acting beta-agonist canisters.

“We found an increased risk of emergency department visits or asthma related hospital stays in overweight (26-40%) and obese individuals (36-57%). We also found that obese patients are likelier to use seven or more short-acting beta-agonist canisters,” co-author Robert Zeiger, MD, PhD, FAAAAI said.

A number of reasons could explain the relationship between poor asthma control and obesity, including:

* Gastroesophageal reflux disease

* Depression

* Reduced corticosteroid responsiveness

* Adipokines or cell signaling proteins secreted by body fat

* Direct effects on pulmonary functions

The size of this study allowed the investigators to account for some of these factors (gastroesophageal reflux disease, depression, and inhaled corticosteroid treatment) as well as other factors that influence asthma control (age, gender, smoking and socioeconomic status). This large study will provide medical professionals a more comprehensive understanding of the association between elevated BMI and poor asthma control. It is important because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that more than one in three adults over the age of 20 are obese. Similarly, more than two in three adults over the age of 20 are overweight or obese.

“While further studies will be needed to better define the amount of weight loss necessary to improve asthma outcomes, it remains clear that physicians managing overweight and obese patients with asthma should actively encourage and facilitate weight loss interventions,” Schatz explained.

The study was published on May 11, 2015 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (JACI: In Practice), an official journal of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). It should be noted that this study was supported by a research grant from Merck and Co. Inc.

More information on asthma is available at AAAAI.org. The AAAAI represents allergists, asthma specialists, clinical immunologists, allied health professionals and others with a special interest in the research and treatment of allergic and immunologic diseases. Established in 1943, the AAAAI has more than 6,800 members in the United States, Canada and 72 other countries. The AAAAI’s Find an Allergist/Immunologist service is a trusted resource to help you find a specialist close to home.

Understanding Obesity From The Inside Out

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This article is courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your comments below….

obesityNew lab method reveals roles of GABA in the control of appetite and metabolism

In the last 40 years, obesity has more than doubled around the world. In the United States, the average American is more than 24 pounds heavier today than in 1960. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and the University of Washington are studying the problem of obesity from the inside out.

The researchers developed a new laboratory method that allowed them to identify GABA as a key player in the complex brain processes that control appetite and metabolism. The team’s results were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Qi Wu, assistant professor of pediatrics at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor and Texas Children’s Hospital led the team that for several years searched for new laboratory methods to better study the function of GABA in the brain.

GABA is a chemical messenger produced by brain cells. It binds to other brain cells via specific receptors and reduces the cells’ activity. Research has implicated GABA in the complex neurological processes that control fear and anxiety, and also in those related to the control of appetite and metabolism. But direct proof of the role GABA plays in weight control has been elusive in part for the lack of better methodology to precisely control GABA production by brain cells.

“We developed a new experimental system based in in-frame, nonsense mutations and aminoglycosides, which allowed us to abruptly stop the synthesis of GABA in adult animals,” Wu said. “We were able to silence the genes involved in the synthesis of GABA in a particular set of cells located in the hypothalamus, the brain area that controls appetite. As a result, these cells, called AgRP neurons, stop producing GABA as quick as in four days.”

Wu and colleagues then observed the changes in weight and the behavior of these mice lacking GABA in their brain area for control of appetite.

The researchers studied two groups of mice; two month old young adults, and 8 month old mice. The young adult mice without GABA stopped eating, lost tremendous amount of weight, increased their physical activity and became glucose intolerant. On the other hand, the much older mice only lost their appetite temporarily.

healthillustratedThe findings are significant to the study of obesity as they strongly indicate that GABA is a potential candidate for targeted drug design that may lead to medications that help control appetite and metabolism.

“Our hope is that the new and better methodology we have developed will be used by other genetics labs as a tool for selectively silencing other genes,” Wu said.

Other researchers involved in this work are Wu lab team members including Fantao Meng, Yong Han, Dollada Srisai, Mónica Farías and Yong Xu from Baylor; Valery Belakhov and Timor Baasov from Technion-Israel Institute of Technology; and Richard D. Palmiter from the University of Washington.

This work was supported by the Pew Charitable Trust; American Diabetes Association Junior Faculty Award #7-13-JF-61; Baylor Collaborative Faculty Research Investment Program grants; USDA/ARS CRIS grants; new faculty start-up grants from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Iowa; NIH grants R01DK093587, R01DK101379, and R01-DA24908. The authors include an HHMI Investigator, a Pew Scholar of Biomedical Sciences and a Kavli Scholar.

Malnutrition And Obesity

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Dr. Michael Feiz. What are your thoughts about this article, please share your thoughts below…..

informationredCommenting on the recent article, the Los Angeles bariatric surgeon notes that no one is immune from the possibility of malnutrition, and it is important that patients make sure they receive sufficient nutrients before and after weight loss surgery.

According to an article published September 15th on News Medical, a recent study tracking the vitamin and mineral levels of patients before they had weight loss surgery showed that the occurrence of malnutrition in weight loss surgery patients may have nothing to do with the procedure itself. The study revealed that 20 percent of patients examined by the study had at least three major nutrient deficiencies before having their procedure, pointing to the fact that nutrient deficiency might have more to do with being obese than it does with losing weight. According to Los Angeles bariatric surgeon Dr. Michael Feiz, this finding may come as a surprise to many people, and is an important reminder of the difference between caloric intake and nutrition.

Dr. Feiz notes that many people assume that obesity means that a person is eating a large amount of food, so they are therefore receiving a large amount of nutrients. Yet, he explains, a person can eat a great deal of unhealthy food and still lack the nutrients that go along with eating a healthy diet. If a patient is eating very unhealthy food, or simply a large amount of the same type of food, their nutrients may be unbalanced like many of the patients examined in this study.

Regardless of whether or not a patient has nutrient deficiencies before their surgery, Dr. Feiz notes that it is vital that they take nutrient supplements during their weight loss journey. Part of the reason why people naturally assumed that nutrient deficiencies among bariatric patients were a result of their weight loss, Dr. Feiz explains, is that a reduction in food intake does logically lead to a reduction in nutrients. While this study points out that at least some of the bariatric patients suffering from nutrient deficiencies had those issues before they began losing weight, it should not be taken to mean that supplements during each individual’s weight loss journey are any less important.

For countless patients, weight loss surgery with Dr. Feiz and Associates gave them the tools that they need to successfully lose weight and keep the weight off. For many of them, equally important to their success was the carefully considered nutrient regimen that Dr. Feiz and his staff provide for each patient in order to ensure the healthiest possible weight loss. Anyone interested in learning more about weight loss surgery or in scheduling their appointment today to get started on their weight loss journey can call Dr. Feiz and Associates at 310-855-8058 or visit the medical office online at http://www.DrFeiz.com.

Love, Compassion, And Childhood Obesity

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By Jay Helliwell

The Statistics, Problem, and Truth of Obesity in Children.

active family“Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years,” writes cdc.gov. “In 2012, more than one third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese.”
According to the Letsmove movement, an organization dedicated to raising a healthier generation of kids in America, children who are obese are at the whim of illnesses that target blood pressure, the cardiovascular system, the pancreas, and even their ability to sleep.

“Obese children and teens have been found to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and abnormal glucose tolerance,” they write. “In addition to suffering from poor physical health, overweight and obese children can often be targets of early social discrimination… there have been some studies showing that obese children are not learning as well as those who are not obese.”

It’s obvious: obesity in children and adolescents has not just become another health issue we need to be worried about, it’s become an epidemic of its very own. Millions of children around the world suffer with poor physical health and treatment that results in obesity. Obesity, in turn, results in lack of motivation, less achievement, and lower self-esteem. Young kids with low self-esteem and no motivation aren’t propelled to succeed in life, and these leaders of tomorrow seldom seek and discover the help and guidance they need.

What do you do if your child or one close to you is obese? The very first step in the process is to let them know that you’ll be there for them and supportive. “Children’s feelings about themselves often are based on their parents’ feelings about them,” states an article written on WebMD. “If you accept your children at any weight, they will be more likely to feel good about themselves.” Separation and discrimination are most certainly not the ways to go about reconciling your child about their weight; make sure that they always feel loved, welcomed, and secure when they’re around you, but it’s simultaneously important to let them know they need to begin to take certain steps to become healthier.

Another tip is to gradually increase physical activity and healthier eating habits within the entire family, so that the obese child feels as if everyone else in the family is being involved, too. Family involvement can be a massive esteem-boost and prevents the obese child from “feeling singled-out.” Lead by example, involve everyone in your activities, and always be sensitive to the child’s needs. Insensitivity and lack of initiative are exactly what you want to avoid.

obesityA second measure you can take to conquer child obesity and help ensure your child is getting the treatment he or she needs is to start a medical crowdfund. Plumfund, a website that gives you the tools to start local crowdfund campaigns for fundraising, health needs, and medical bills, is just one of the many options available to you. Oftentimes, when your own funds can’t always cover expenses, it’s a good idea to reach out to family and friends for a helping hand. Plumfund is free of charge, created by real people, for real people; and posts some of their successful campaigns on their home page.

Plumfund also illustrates a quote by Dalai Lama on their home page: “Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.” No matter how tall, small, thin, or obese a child is, he or she never deserves anything less than to feel like they matter and have a voice in the world; something that these two feelings always provide.

– Submitted by guest author, Jay Helliwell.

Watching More TV As A Young Adult Predicts Obesity

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the University of Pittsburgh, please share your comments below…..

familytvSome people who watch more television than their peers are at increased risk for injuries, new University of Pittsburgh study finds.

The more hours young adults spend watching television each day, the greater the likelihood that they’ll have a higher body mass index and bigger waist circumference, a 15-year analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health revealed.

The association did not hold in later years, indicating that young adulthood is an important time to intervene and promote less television viewing, according to the research published online in the journal SAGE Open.

“We were quite surprised to find that television viewing was associated with subsequent obesity for young adults, but not for the middle-aged,” said lead author Anthony Fabio, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health. “This suggests that middle-aged adults may differ from young adults in how they respond to the influence of TV viewing.”

Dr. Fabio and his colleagues analyzed data from 3,269 adults recruited from Birmingham, Ala., Chicago, Minneapolis, and Oakland, Calif., who participated in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. For 15 years starting in 1990, the participants reported their television viewing habits and had their waist circumference measured and their body mass index (a measure of weight and height that can indicate obesity) calculated every five years.

The more time participants spent watching television when they were approximately 30 years old, the more likely they were to be obese five years later, compared to their peers who spent less time in front of the television. The team did not have data on younger ages.

Dr. Fabio and his team suspect many potential reasons for the association, including that young adults may be more likely to snack during television viewing and consume unhealthy food due to their greater susceptibility to the seduction of junk food advertising on television. In support of that hypothesis, the CARDIA study also found that participants were more likely to eat healthier foods as they aged.

The analysis found that 23 percent of the men and 20.6 percent of the women participating in the study watched four or more hours of television daily. Within that group of heavy TV watchers, 35.9 percent were black, and 8.6 percent were white; and 40.8 percent had a high school education or less, vs. 17.4 percent with an education beyond high school.

A lower family income and higher rates of smoking and drinking also were associated with more time spent watching television.

“Television viewing and obesity are both highly prevalent in many populations around the world,” said Dr. Fabio. “This means that even small reductions in television viewing could lead to vast public health improvements. Reducing sedentary time should be a healthy lifestyle guideline heavily promoted to the public. Our study indicates that the biggest bang for the buck would be in targeting young adults for interventions to reduce television viewing. Healthy lifestyle behaviors should start at early ages.”

Additional authors on this research are Chung-Yu Chen and Karen Matthews, Ph.D., of Pitt; Stephen Dearwater, M.S., of Jackson Memorial Hospital; David Jacobs, Ph.D., Darin Erickson, Ph.D., and Mark Pereira, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health; Carlos Iribarren, M.D., Ph.D., and Stephen Sidney, M.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente Northern California.

This research was funded by in part by research grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) (R03AG028504) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U49-CE000764). The CARDIA study is supported by contracts HHSN268201300025C, HHSN268201300026C, HHSN268201300027C, HHSN268201300028C, HHSN268201300029C and HHSN268200900041C from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Intramural Research Program of the NIA, and an intra-agency agreement between NIA and NHLBI (AG0005).

About the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, founded in 1948 and now one of the top-ranked schools of public health in the United States, conducts research on public health and medical care that improves the lives of millions of people around the world. Pitt Public Health is a leader in devising new methods to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases, HIV/AIDS, cancer and other important public health problems. For more information about Pitt Public Health, visit the school’s Web site at http://www.publichealth.pitt.edu.

How Exercise Can Prevent Childhood Obesity

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jumpingsacsIn the past 30 years, the number of adolescents (14-18 years old) with childhood obesity has doubled and the number of children (up to age 13) with childhood obesity has tripled. Childhood obesity increases the risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis as an adult.

There are many causes of the sedentary lifestyle that now challenges the youth of today. These causes include physical education no longer present in school, the increased use of electronics including video games, computers, cell phones, etc., TV watching, not walking/biking to school, not eating enough fruits and vegetables, and eating foods high in sugar and fat.

The main goal of developing an exercise program and healthy eating habits in childhood is to help kids gain an appreciation for the value of taking care of oneself as well as living a healthy lifestyle that will last into adulthood.

Tips for creating a fitness program for children/adolescents

* The exercise goals for a kids’ fitness program are different than those for adults. In order for a child/adolescent to stick with an exercise program, it is important to make the exercise fun and positive. Additionally, kids are interested in making friends and learning skills. If kids experience success and gain confidence in their physical abilities, then they will feel good about themselves.

* Kids mature at different rates, they are still growing, and many children/adolescents are doing physical activities for the first time; all which should be considered when planning a fitness program.

* Play is a very important part of fitness for kids. Without play, a kid will likely quit the physical activity. Furthermore, variety is important to ensure adhering to an exercise program. Children/adolescents will get bored of a repetitive routine and should be exposed to a wide variety of sports and activities.

* 60 minutes per day of exercise is ideal for kids. This 60 minutes should be broken up throughout the day and can include recess, sports, walking/biking to and from school, recreational activities, chores, and playing on the playground. For a very inactive child/adolescent, increase activity 10% per week to reach a goal of 60 minutes per day.

* It is important to incorporate games that include fundamental movements such as skipping, hopping, throwing, kicking etc. in order to create a base of movement for other sports and activities. These skills also ensure that a child/adolescent is moving his/her body safely and reduces embarrassment or failure in the future if they are unable to perform basic movements.

* A fitness program for children/adolescents should incorporate a warm up and cool down, aerobics, strength training, and stretching. Cardiovascular exercise (with breaks) should be made up of skipping, jumping, etc. and using balls, hoops etc. Muscular strength and endurance exercises are now considered safe and effective for kids who are emotionally mature enough and can improve body composition, but should not be performed two days in a row.

waterbottle* It is important for kids to stay hydrated while exercising. Aim to drink water every 15-20 minutes during physical activity.

There is a lot that can be done to make a big difference in preventing childhood obesity and future health problems. We have already seen that gym memberships have increased over 50% for kids who are 6-17 years old. Not only is exercise and fitness beneficial in preventing and treating childhood obesity, but it also lowers body fat, strengthens bones, builds muscle, improves physical/sports performance, improves well-being and self esteem, and enhances academic performance!

I will see you at your next workout!

Aaron Wright
Look Younger. Feel Stronger. Live Longer.

Aaron Wright, CSCS, AHFS, CPT, creator of the Wright Now Fitness System, a comprehensive DVD and digital exercise system “for everyone”, is a certified strength and conditioning specialist, an ACE advanced health and fitness specialist, ACE certified personal trainer, orthopedic exercise specialist, functional training specialist, sports conditioning specialist, therapeutic exercise specialist, exercise programming expert, and health and wellness speaker.

Please visit us at http://www.wrightnowfitness.com for more information on our DVD and digital download/instant streaming workouts and more tips and advice on the benefits of diet and exercise to prevent childhood obesity.

NOTE: Always consult your physician or health care provider before beginning any exercise program.

References

1. Faigenbaum, Avery D. (2012). Youth In Ace Advanced Health & Fitness Specialist Manual (pp. 552-572) United States of America: American Council on Exercise (ACE).

Health Briefs TV To Present View On Obesity Update

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Article courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

obesityHealth Briefs TV will soon present a segment covering the updates on obesity.

Health Briefs TV is scheduled to present a View on obesity segment update. More than two-thirds of the American population is overweight or obese, according to a recently published report. The top-notch health and medical show will examine preventative steps communities, families and schools can take to combat the medical and societal problem. From corner stores to school lunch rooms and kitchen pantries, there are always healthy alternatives to choose. The health briefs segment will air soon on cable television networks – regionally and nationally – in the United States.

The Health Briefs TV show explores the emerging technologies, progressive treatments, revolutionary people, and innovative healthcare options that are all part of the global health industry. It explores topics relating to the health and medical fields and offers valuable information about the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many common ailments. The show’s producers take pride in sharing up-to-date, valuable information about new procedures, prevention tips and outstanding businesses. It also features interviews with innovative health and medical professionals in the industry.

The program is hosted by Kevin Harrington. It is headquartered in South Florida and films on location throughout the United States and Canada. It is broadcast on most regional and national cable television networks. The show is a proud leader of quality, educational programming. It is produced in part by Anthony DiMeglio, Melissa Leibowitz and Rob Marshall. Join the fans, the show’s staff on popular social sites to discuss and comment on stories of the day. Learn more about Health Briefs TV on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest and health-briefs.com.

Videos Provide Helpful Information About Childhood Obesity

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

obesityLearn about childhood obesity causes, trends and prevention from Mercy Health expert. Mercy Health published a video last week about childhood obesity.

Mercy Health (formerly Catholic Health Partners) – a Catholic healthcare ministry serving Ohio and Kentucky – has devoted the sixth of its monthly Mercy Health: Helping You Be Well videos to childhood obesity issues. Experts say one in three youngsters is overweight or obese.

In a concise video on Mercy Health’s YouTube channel, a Mercy Health expert addresses these childhood obesity-related questions:

* Why is childhood obesity worse now than when we were kids?

* How can we get kids to eat better?

* Should I cut out sweets altogether?

* Won’t most kids just outgrow it?

* What can we do as parents to prevent childhood obesity?

An infographic with childhood obesity facts is available at http://bit.ly/1PIVcsx. Mercy Health is also sharing helpful information throughout the month on its social media channels.

Mercy Health: Helping You Be Well, which spotlights key health issues and tips for healthy living, debuted in December. The videos feature Mercy Health physician experts who are committed to making lives better – mind, body and spirit.

About Mercy Health

Mercy Health (formerly Catholic Health Partners) is the largest health system in Ohio and one of the largest health systems in the United States, employing more than 32,000 employees in Ohio and Kentucky. With $6 billion in assets, Mercy Health operates about 450 health facilities, including 23 hospitals, eight senior living communities, five hospice programs and seven home health agencies. Truven Health Analytics (formerly Thomson Reuters) consistently rates Mercy Health among the nation’s top health systems for clinical quality and efficiency. In keeping with its mission, Mercy Health providesabout $1 million per day in community benefit services. Mercy Health’s bonds are rated AA- by Standard & Poor’s and Fitch, and A1 by Moody’s. Mercy Health also partners with HealthSpan which provides health maintenance organization and insurance coverage. Mercy Health is a founding member of Health Innovations Ohio, which focuses on providing health services that result in higher quality, better health and greater value. For more information, visit http://www.mercy.com or connect with Mercy Health on Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest and Twitter (@LivingMercyHlth).

Obesity And Acid Reflux Precursors For Esophageal Cancer

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Submitted by The Baylor College of Medicine…..

newsDriven by obesity and acid reflux, adenocarcinoma of the esophagus has become the fastest rising cancer in white men in the United States, said experts from Baylor College of Medicine and University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in a review article published in New England Journal of Medicine. The review summarizes the latest developments in the risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the two major types of esophageal cancer.

“It’s important to remember that the risk factors (obesity and acid reflux) are potentially modifiable,” said Dr. Hashem El-Serag, senior author of the review and chief of gastroenterology and hepatology at Baylor.

Esophageal cancer is rare in young individuals but increases with age, peaking at ages 70 to 80. The cancer is three to four times as common in men as it is in women, the authors stated.

The review details how daily and weekly symptoms of acid reflux increase a person’s likelihood of developing this form of cancer. It also explains how abdominal obesity increases the risk of developing Barrett’s esophagus and cancer. Increased pressure causes the stomach to move upward, which can cause and exacerbate acid reflux symptoms.

Barrett’s esophagus, a precursor lesion to adenocarcinoma, can be detected through an endoscopy.

“People who are obese or have chronic acid reflux should consider having an endoscopy to be screened for Barrett’s or adenocarcinoma,” El-Serag stressed.

A technique called radiofrequency ablation can help prevent progression to cancer in those with Barrett’s esophagus who develop an abnormality called dysplasia.

“Radiofrequency ablation can be done endoscopically by a gastroenterologist,” El-Serag explained. “This reduces the risk of cancer and has proven safe and effective.”

He estimated that as many as 86 percent of dysplasia cases treated with radiofrequency do not go on to become cancer.

The other author in this review is Anil K. Rustgi, chief of gastroenterology at University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.