Nutritionist Comments On New FDA Trans Fat Regulations

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Article courtesy of K-State News & Communications Services…..

http://yourhealthjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kickhabit.jpgThe Food and Drug Administration has announced that partially hydrogenated oils, which are the primary dietary source of trans fat, are not “generally recognized as safe” for use in food. This ruling comes two years after the FDA’s first tentative determination of the same finding and a request for comments on the matter. The FDA has given the food industry until 2018 to stop using partially hydrogenated oils and fats in processed food products.

Mary Meck Higgins, a Kansas State University associate professor of human nutrition and an expert in food and nutrition, discusses what the announcement means for nutrition and the food industry.

Expert name: Mary Meck Higgins

Expertise: Kansas State University associate professor of human nutrition, K-State Research and Extension specialist, fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and

Dietetics, registered dietitian and licensed dietitian

Website: http://www.he.k-state.edu/hn/people/faculty/higgins/

Comments/quotes:

What is trans fat?

“The primary dietary source of trans fat is partially hydrogenated oils. These oils are produced by a process called hydrogenation, where some hydrogen is added to a liquid vegetable oil, which converts it into a solid when it’s at room temperature. Partially hydrogenated oils and fats, and thus artificial trans fat, have been in many processed foods for the past 60 years. They are used to improve the shelf life, texture and flavor stability of a processed food.”

“Foods sold without a nutrition facts or ingredients label do not have partially hydrogenated oils or artificial trans fat in them. Small amounts — typically about 2 to 3 percent — of naturally occurring trans fat may be found in some cooking oils and in the fat component of dairy and meat products from ruminant animals, such as cattle, sheep and goats.”

What does this announcement mean?

“Food companies will have three years to stop using partially hydrogenated oils and fats in their processed food products. After that, there should no longer be artificial trans fat in our food supply.”

Why is it important?

“Eating partially hydrogenated oils and partially hydrogenated fats is a strong risk factor for getting heart disease, which is the No. 1 cause of death for men and women in the U.S. They contribute to the buildup of plaque inside the arteries that may cause a heart attack. Eliminating them from the food supply should prevent thousands of deadly heart attacks each year and fewer people will get heart disease.”

“Currently, eliminating trans fat from one’s diet entirely is all but impossible because it’s practically unavoidable in the U.S. diet. People would also have to spend lots of time reading two kinds of food labels. The nutrition facts label shows how many grams of trans fat are in one serving of each processed food. In many instances though, a food that is made with partially hydrogenated oils has too little trans fat in it per serving to be listed on the nutrition facts label. For foods showing 0 grams trans fat, one must then look at the mostly small-print ingredients list. If a partially hydrogenated oil or fat is listed as an ingredient, then that food does contain a small amount of trans fat. The new FDA ruling will eliminate the need to have to do all of this, since partially hydrogenated oils will no longer be in our food supply once it goes into effect.”

What else should we know about this announcement?

“Food companies have three years to eliminate partially hydrogenated oils and fats from their products. Until then, check ingredient lists of foods — especially frozen pizzas, coffee creamers, stick margarines, microwave popcorn, crackers, cookies, refrigerated dough products, cakes, packaged pies, ready to use frostings and nutrition bars — and avoid those brands that contain partially hydrogenated oils and fats.”

“To further reduce risk of heart disease, people should limit dietary saturated fats. On average, people living in the U.S. eat four to five times as much saturated fat as trans fat.”

How can a person reduce dietary saturated fat?

“Eat at least three one-ounce servings of whole grains and 4 1/2 cups of fruits and vegetables a day. Eat seafood — including oily fish — and cooked dry beans and peas in place of some meat and poultry. Choose skinless poultry. For beef and pork, choose lean cuts — such as loin — and at least 90 percent lean ground. Limit intake of fatty meats, such as sausage, franks, bacon and ribs. In addition, choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, cheeses and other dairy products. Cook and bake with liquid oils instead of shortenings, butter and lard.”

The Role Model In You – Ilana Muhlstein, Nutritionist

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Today’s Guest, Ilana Muhlstein

As part of the new web series, The Role Model In You — here is the most recent interview. The Role Model In You series discusses how individuals were influenced as a child to lead a healthy lifestyle. It covers who influenced these individuals, the changes they made in their life to be healthy, and the message they would like to convey to the youth of today. Our guests include doctors, soccer stars, Super Bowl champions, NBA players, Olympic gold medalist, entrepreneurs, celebrities, and just regular people looking to share their story. We hope you enjoy it!

1. Your name, title, and age? What do you do (or did you do) for a living?

Ilana Muhlstein, Nutritionist, 24, Dietetic Intern at City of Hope Hospital and Certified Yoga Instructor

2. Who was the person that inspired you as a child to eat healthy and stay fit? What was their relationship to you?

My great aunt lived till she was 101 years old and always stayed active and fit. She always walked everywhere and ate a healthy balanced diet.

3. What did they do to inspire you?

She always demonstrated healthy habits around me.

4. How did their lesson change your life?

She inspired me to lose weight when I was overweight as a kid which jump started my career in nutrition and fitness.

5. Do you convey their message to kids in your life presently?

100% She taught me the key to a long healthy life is a healthy diet and regular physical activity and I definitely teach that method on a daily basis.

6. What would be your main message to children today to lead healthy lifestyles?

Go out and play! Get involved in a sport young. Being part of a sports team gives you discipline, social interaction, positive reinforcement and of course, a regular exercise routine to keep you fit and healthy.

7. Do you have a web site you would like to promote….web address only?

www.ilana4health.com

I do provate nutritional and yoga instruction and have great healthy recipes, fitness videos, and articles on the site as well. :

The Role Model In You – Stella Metsovas B.S., C.C.N, Nutritionist

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Role Model

Stella Metsovas


As part of the new web series, The Role Model In You — here is the most recent interview. The Role Model In You series discusses how individuals were influenced as a child to lead a healthy lifestyle. It covers who influenced these individuals, the changes they made in their life to be healthy, and the message they would like to convey to the youth of today. Our guests include doctors, soccer stars, Super Bowl champions, NBA players, Olympic gold medalist, entrepreneurs, celebrities, and just regular people looking to share their story. We hope you enjoy it!

1. Your name, title, and age? What do you do (or did you do) for a living?

Stella Metsovas B.S., C.C.N, is a clinically licensed nutritionist and digestive health expert, and 10 years of private practice. Beyond her practice, Stella is regularly called on as a media resource; featured as a diet and nutrition expert in People, Glamour, Shape, Redbook, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, AOL, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, and many others. Woman’s World named Stella one of ‘America’s Ultimate Experts,” and her blog was recognized as ‘One of the Top 50 Blogs Every Dietitian Should Read.” Stella is also excited to announce the launch of her 21 Day Digestive Health Detox with Botanic Choice–a vitamin and herbal company in operation for over 100 years.

2. Who was the person that inspired you as a child to eat healthy and stay fit? What was their relationship to you?

My earliest recollection of having this fascination towards foods, biological processes and my own innate feeling after consuming certain foodstuffs began during my summers in the villages of Greece. Coming from Orange County, California, and traveling to these remote villages in the 1980s and 90’s were nothing less than shocking. My breakfast, lunch and dinners were definitely very primal in a sense, like milking a goat; having a stew of bone broths; picking wild greens for lunch; harvesting your own chickens and goats, and making your own yogurt. I would ask the villagers why the milk came straight from the animal, rather than purchasing from the market. And for lunch, why did the village ladies believe a hearty meal was best? For dinner, why did they insist on keeping the lighter fare? I’d say my inspiration came from the villagers; the real experience of how food is made and used for life.

3. What did they do to inspire you?

Their ethics behind food and healthful living were quite simple but yet so accurate. They inspired me to explore the curiosities with human health–both the good and bad. I always felt different when I returned back to the States. Although I was fortunate enough to have somewhat of a healthy diet, when we gorged on Westernized-style foods, I felt the physiological consequence and connected the feeling with how I felt in the village. I feel that optimal health relies on 95 percent of what you consume. I learned that early on.

4. How did their lesson change your life?

I’ve dedicated my life to exploring the genetic lessons our food chain is currently trying to teaching us. From the rise of degenerative diseases to childhood obesity, the lesson learned is not to manipulate or mess with nature. That, exactly, is what I learned in the villages of Greece.

5. Do you convey their message to kids in your life presently?

Kids are very smart and we often underestimate their ability to learn. I believe in recycling correct information adapted through generations. In a sense, I believe, we are loosing a large part of how life survives best in simplicity. There is nothing greater than nourishing a child with information.

6. What would be your main message to children today to lead healthy lifestyles?

Ask them about how they feel after eating something unhealthy. How did you feel after having all that ice cream? Connect them with the instincts of actually feeling healthy early on. That, of course, depends on the parents. If the parents don’t feel healthy, it’s very hard to teach children the connection. Parents must become healthy first.

7. Do you have a web site you would like to promote….web address only?

www.stellametsovas.com and www.21daydigestivehealthdetox.com