Understanding Nutrition During Pregnancy

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This article was submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your comments below…..

PregnantFor everyone, a nutritious and well-balanced diet is essential to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But for pregnant women, nutrition is doubly important – it’s a key factor for their own health and that of their baby.

“Pregnant women should eat three meals a day and between-meal snacks,” said Dr. Nina Ali, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine. “Meals should include foods from all five food groups: grains, fruits, vegetables, proteins and dairy.”

Ali advises women to be mindful of their diet choices and to drink plenty of water to help curb the out-of-control cravings.

“Try to choose food with nutritional value and allow yourself to indulge in small quantities,” said Ali.

Cravings are hard to avoid while pregnant. However, Ali recommends that pregnant woman avoid specific foods altogether.

Women should not consume unpasteurized milk, hot dogs, lunch meats and cold cuts (unless they are heated to steaming hot), raw or undercooked seafood, eggs and meat, fish with high mercury content such as swordfish, king mackerel or tilefish, said Ali.

Nutrition choices also can play a role in minimizing morning sickness that many women experience during pregnancy, she said.

“Ginger candy and ginger tea can be soothing for nausea,” Ali said. “Eat small snacks throughout the day rather than large meals, and avoid heavy or spicy foods. When these measures do not help, talk to your ob-gyn doctor about nausea medications.”

In addition to maintaining a healthy diet while pregnant, Ali recommends women continue to manage a balanced diet after giving birth.

“A healthy, well-balanced diet is an essential part of the mother’s recovery after giving birth,” said Ali. “Also for moms who are breast-feeding, caloric demands and nutrition needs are even higher than while pregnant. I recommend moms continue prenatal vitamins for 6 weeks or as long as they continue breastfeeding.”

During and after pregnancy it is essential to eat nutritious meals and be mindful of good dietary choices.

“A well balanced diet will give your body the building blocks it needs to maintain good health for you and for your baby,” said Ali.

Baylor College Of Medicine Expert Dispels Nutrition Myths

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newsThis article was submitted by the Baylor College Of Medicine…..please share your comments below…..

Diet and exercise typically comes down to common sense, but we don’t always want to believe it, according to Roberta Anding, registered dietitian with Baylor College of Medicine. Instead, we’re more likely to believe the sensationalized information or fads.

Anding breaks down some common myths for us and simplifies how to eat healthy:

Myth #1: I should eat more protein because of my new exercise program

Your intensity determines your nutritional need – whether you should add more protein to your diet depends on the intensity of your workouts, and most of us are not working out at that intensity to need additional protein than what is recommended for us.

Anding says to divide up your protein throughout the day, and especially be sure to combine protein with carbohydrates for breakfast to fuel you for the day and help you control your appetite all day long. A bagel and cream cheese is not the ideal breakfast – consider half a bagel with scrambled eggs. Don’t backload your protein at the end of the day – start adding protein with breakfast.

Myth #2: BMI is the best tool for goal setting

If you never work out, you may have a higher percent body fat, whether or not you are obese according to your BMI. This can put you at risk for sarcopenic obesity, a condition in which you are losing muscle mass and adding body fat. It is possible to be normal weight but metabolically obese. Anding says the best way to determine your percent body fat is to get a Bod Pod test done. This can tell you how much of your weight is lean weight and how much is not.

Myth #3: Eating healthy is confusing

One of the keys to eating healthy is to fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables. Anding suggests if weight loss is your goal invest in smaller plates so that your portions are automatically smaller. Be sure to distinguish between a meal versus a snack. A snack for women should be less than 150 calories, and for a man should be less than 200 calories. To limit snack portions, put your snack on a plate rather than picking at food – this will hold you more accountable for your portion size.

Myth #4: Organic food will prevent chronic illness

There is no scientific data to support this. Eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables and focusing on a plant-based diet has been shown to prevent chronic illnesses. Consider purchasing a fruit and vegetable brush to wash your produce with before consuming it if you are worried about pesticides.

Myth #5: High fructose corn syrup is the reason for America’s weight crisis

applescaleCompared to Americans in the 1970s, we now eat 500 calories more and exercise less. This is what’s contributing to the weight crisis. Americans eat too much sugar in all forms. The new Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting sugars. Focus on added sugars, not the natural sugar in milk or fruits.

Myth #6: Muscle weighs more than fat

Muscle is more compact than fat, but one pound is one pound. Anding says that what you choose to put in your body is what makes all the difference. However, increasing your weight through adding muscle is advantageous. Increasing your muscle mass increases the amount of calories you burn at rest since the muscle is the metabolic engine.

Sleep And Proper Nutrition Are Essential For Final Exam Success

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This article was submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine, please leave your comments below…..

sleepBefore the summer fun can begin, many students need to make it through the dreaded final exam period. According to experts at Baylor College of Medicine, putting the books and notes to the side for proper sleep and nutrition can be just as important as studying.

Studies have shown that sleep affects memory and learning and that a lack of sleep has a negative impact on things associated with learning, such as school performance in children. For teens and adolescents who persistently study late into the night and pull all-nighters to cram for an exam, it may be better to put the books down and hit the sack for a few hours to cement the knowledge into their brain, according to Dr. Philip Alapat, assistant professor of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine and program director of the Baylor College of Medicine Sleep Medicine Fellowship.

So how much sleep, on average, should you be getting? The National Sleep Foundation released these recommendations in 2015:

Newborn (0-3 months): 14-17 hours

Infant (4-11 months): 12-15 hours

Toddler (1-2 years): 11-14 hours

Preschooler (3-5 years): 10-13 hours

School-aged child (6-13 years): 9-11 hours

Teen (14-17 years): 8 -10 hours

Young adult (18-25 years): 7-9 hours

Adult (26-64 years): 7-9 hours

Older adult (65+ years): 7-8 hours

Your diet also may be important for optimal academic performance.

“Your brain needs high-quality food,” said Roberta Anding, a registered dietitian with Baylor.

Make sure to have a source of protein with each meal as proteins help the timely release of carbohydrates in the body. Breakfasts should include a quality carbohydrate such as oatmeal or shredded wheat, combined with a protein such as eggs, yogurt or Canadian bacon. Another breakfast combination could include scrambled eggs, oatmeal and half of a grapefruit.

“Don’t forget that you need carbohydrates to fuel your brain, so don’t skip breakfast,” she said.

Anding suggests avoiding sugary snacks before exams – sugar on an empty stomach can cause a rapid rise and fall in blood sugar and make focus and concentration more difficult.

Also be sure to hydrate.

“We often lose our cue to drink when it’s cool outside, but making sure you are hydrated with water can improve your sense of well-being,” said Anding.

National Nutrition Month® Tips

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below….

healthillustrated“Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle” during March’s National Nutrition Month® by working toward consuming fewer calories, making informed food decisions, and participating in a daily exercise routine.

March is National Nutrition Month®, an annual nutrition education and information campaign sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The 2015 theme is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” which promotes the consumption of fewer calories, informed food decisions, and daily exercise for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, reducing risks of chronic diseases and promoting overall wellness.

Whether a person is new to physical fitness activities or a pro, nutrition can seem complicated. Many nutritionists create intense and detailed food regimens for their clients, but a solid nutrition program can be simple and still very beneficial. For those wanting the most from a diet and fitness routine, the following tips may help:

1.Daily balanced diet. For consistent performance at the gym or with a sport, the body needs a regular supply of quality energy for the muscles. A few daily essentials for meeting the body’s needs include: a balanced breakfast; carbohydrates for fuel; and proteins and fats appropriate for a person’s individual body-type and fitness goals.

2.Day of the workout. For those tackling a workout first thing in the morning, be sure to have a light breakfast like fruit, toast, and/or an egg. For those who workout in the evenings, have a lunch that easily digestible but includes complex carbs. Pasta, fruits, vegetables or a salad with lean meat (chicken or fish) are good examples.

3. Immediately prior to workout. About 30 minutes before an intense workout, eat a light to moderate snack and drink some water. The amount of food a person should ingest depends on the length and intensity of their upcoming workout. Longer, harder activities may require the individual to eat an energy bar or large banana.

4.During workout. Necessary hydration varies from person to person, but a good rule of thumb is to intake 8 to 10 fl oz of water every 15 minutes while exercising. For those working out longer than 90 minutes, carbohydrates will likely need to be replenished as well, making a sports drink more of an ideal choice.

5.Post-workout hydration. After a workout, water needs to be replaced in the body according to how much a person has sweated. The more perspiration, the more hydration required. To be absolutely precise, check body weight before and after the physical activity. For every pound decrease, a person should drink about 3 cups of water.

6.Post-workout food. Glycogen stores should be replenished within two hours after an intense workout. Research shows that a 4-to-1 ratio of carbs to proteins is the ideal post-workout nutrition combination. The nourishment can come in the form of solid food, a liquid shake, or a combination of the two.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

Link Between Nutrition And Eye Health

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eyeTo Celebrate National Health & Vision Month, IALVS Doctors Expose Often ‘Unknown’ Link Between Nutrition & Eye Health.

International Academy of Low Vision Specialist Doctors from across the country are working diligently this month to educate Americans so they can eat right and protect their eyesight. It may sound like an unlikely link but, with forty-three million Americans suffering from Cataracts or Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), there has never been a more vital time to highlight the common dietary errors that are huge contributors to vision loss and blindness.

While National Health & Vision Month brings with it an abundance of awareness and advice, Doctors of Optometry from The International Academy of Low Vision Specialists (IALVS) are preaching from the rooftops about an epidemic that rarely gets airtime – the proven link between nutrition and eye health.

One in six Americans will suffer from Cataracts or Age-Rated Macular Degeneration (AMD) in their senior years and, as IALVS’ Doctor John Pino explains, it likely has a strong correlation to what they eat.

“Research indicates that there is a strong correlation between good nutrition and the prevention of these age-related eye diseases,” he explains. “Eating foods rich in key nutrients including the antioxidants Lutein, Zeaxanthin, and essential fatty acids (Omega 3), as well as vitamins C and E, and the mineral Zinc can help protect eye sight and vision.”

Dr. Richard Shuldiner, founder of IALVS adds, “The problem is that most people don’t get this education in their younger years, while they can still take preventative measures. This month we’re working tirelessly to make the link between nutrition and eye health known, so we can lower the statistics for future generations.”

Dr. Pino, Dr. Shuldiner and the rest of the IALVS member doctors have produced some handy ‘fast facts’ to assist all Americans with their dietary choices:

carrotsMany Americans (48%) still believe, incorrectly, that carrots are the best food for eye health.

In reality, spinach and other dark leafy greens with their large amounts of naturally occurring lutein and zeaxanthin are the healthiest foods for the eyes.

* In order to maintain healthy eyes, studies show that 10 mg of lutein should be consumed each day. The best way to achieve that is with one cup of cooked spinach four times a week.

* More than 50% of Americans do not take in the recommended dosage of vitamin C per day.

* One cup (8 fl oz) of orange juice per day contains 81.6 mg/serving of vitamin C, more than enough to help offset some eye diseases.

To learn more, contact the nearest IALVS doctor today by visiting http://www.ialvs.com or calling (888) 778-2030.

About IALVS:

The International Academy of Low Vision Specialists (IALVS) believes in LIFE AFTER VISION LOSS. The IALVS brings new hope and sight to those with macular degeneration and other vision limiting conditions. The IALVS can bring back the enjoyment of retirement.

If you are now having problems seeing and doing the things you enjoy, an IALVS eye doctor can help. If you have been told by your eye doctor that a change in your eyeglass prescription will not help you see any better, call an IALVS doctor who is trained to design special glasses that can make a difference. When your doctor says, “Sorry, I cannot get you to see any better,” an IALVS doctor often says, “It may not be perfect, but it definitely is better!”

– Submitted by James Collins

Tactics That Can Enhance Nutrition In Elderly

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By Edward Francis

seniors2Malnutrition is a serious problem among the elderly, which is often underestimated. Of non-institutionalized elderly people, an estimated 10 to 50 percent suffer from malnutrition. There are different strategies to improve their nutrition, including dietary approaches, and the use of nutritional supplements.

What is malnutrition?

Malnutrition is a situation where a person’s body is not getting the correct nutrients that it needs to function well. It usually refers to a deficiency in energy producing foods and protein. When a person does not have the food they need, it can result in a decline of their body functions and poor health. Results may include lower muscle strength, reduced immune system, and slower healing of wounds and injuries. There can also be psychological effects, with detrimental impacts on attitude, mood, and self-esteem.

Causes of malnutrition in the elderly

Old people naturally eat less. As people age, there is a natural decrease in energy use, and an associated loss of weight and appetite. Aging also has some effects on the gastrointestinal system that reduce the absorption of some nutrients. Sometimes weakness, dementia, arthritis, pain in the mouth, or general confusion can hinder a person’s ability to eat, resulting in malnutrition. Anxiety, depression, illness, nausea, bereavement, resistance, alcoholism, or social anxiety can all contribute to a person having a poor appetite.

Some medications can interfere with a person’s nutritional status. For instance, they could cause altered tastes, confusion, dry mouth, vomiting, dyspepsia, diarrhea, or hypermetabolism. Some people may not have enough food to eat, either due to their financial situation, or difficulty doing the shopping. In this case, it is paramount for seniors to ask for help and find a way to improve their lifestyles and their diet habits. People who have cancer often suffer from malnutrition too, due to metabolic and physical changes, and the effects of treatments. Surgery can also cause metabolic changes.

Strategies to improve nutrition in seniors

seniorwoman2Before giving someone oral nutritional supplements, the first step should be to get as much of the nutrition as possible for them via their diet, with regular food and drink. This is called the “Food First” approach. Here are specific strategy suggestions.

• Try eating more times per day, with small servings. Instead of three large meals a day, try three small meals plus snacks, so that there is food eaten every 2 or 3 hours.

• Make the most of natural cycles. If a person is naturally hungrier in the morning, make that their biggest meal of the day.

• Eat favorite foods anytime. People are more likely to eat the food they like. If they like breakfast cereal, then why not allow eating this for dinner. If they want soup for breakfast, that’s fine. It will help them keep eating.

• Walk before meals. Taking a short walk before sitting down to eat can stimulate a person’s appetite.

• Drink after meals. Even a glass of water can make you feel more full, resulting in less food intake. Try drinking after eating instead of before.

• Stock convenience foods. Keep a regular supply of food that is easy to prepare and eat. This could include canned soup, pre-made pudding, cereal, nuts, fruit, granola bars, or frozen meals.

• Fortify meals. Add extra energy to meals by adding butter, cheese, salad dressing, honey, oil, or other calorie-rich additions.

Finding solutions for loss of appetite in seniors

Some medications may interfere with a senior’s ability to eat. A cooked breakfast in the morning with eggs, cheese, and baked beans prior to taking medications will keep them energized. Seniors with chewing and swallowing problems are more susceptible to malnutrition than others. In their case, the caregiver should modify the food’s consistency. Tender cuts of chicken meat, soups, and purées, are highly recommended. Adequate mouth and dental care should also be considered.

seniormanSenior people have extremely sensitive bodies. They have a slow metabolism that doesn’t burn much energy and they can’t eat because of the adverse effects of pills. Malnutrition is common in older people and it may lead to more aggressive illnesses, especially when the condition is also caused by mental problems. Caregivers should pay more attention to seniors’ diets and take action as soon as they spot irregularities.

– Edward Francis is interested in writing about health and fitness related issues. He has a deep knowledge at this field. Also he writes for a site supplemented.co.uk which offers high-quality vitamins and supplements at the best possible prices.

All Hail Alexander The Grape!

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

grapesOkay, so I’m kidding. I really do know that Alexander wasn’t a grape and vice versa. But there is something quite regal about grapes and how they benefit our health.

Grapes are rich in:

• polyphenols (naturally occurring plant compounds with antioxidants)

• resveratrol

• phenolic acids

• anthocyanins

• flavonoids

Whether you eat the fruit, seeds or skin; drink the juice; or sip on red wine, grapes can help reduce the risk of heart disease. They also can help to:

1. Reduce blood clotting and abnormal heart rhythms.

2. Lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension.

3. Slow or prevent cell damage caused by oxidation which is a main factor in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries.)

All that goodness in such tiny fruits!

There are basically three categories of grapes: the greens, the reds, and the blue/blacks. Good color is the key to good flavor. The sweetest green grapes are yellow-green in color; red varieties that are predominantly crimson/red will have the best flavor; and blue/black varieties taste best if their color is deep and rich, almost black. If you object to seeds, look for seedless varieties.

For the most nutritional benefits select the darker colored varieties of grapes to obtain the most polyphenol benefits and be sure you eat the fruit or skins over juice when able.

A great summer treat is frozen grapes. Remove the grapes from the stem. Wash and at dry them and place them on a cookies sheet. Allow them to freeze for 4-5 hours and then remove from the cookie sheet and store them in a Ziploc or airtight container in the freezer. Frozen grapes make great ice cubes for summer drinks and also as handy snacks replacing sugary popsicles, frozen candy bars or fat-laden ice cream.

Have a grape summer!

– Kac Young has a PhD in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a television producer/director and the author of: Feng Shui the Easy Way, 21 Days to the Love of Your Life, Gold Mind, Heart Easy, Cheese Dome Power, Discover Your Spiritual Genius, Dancing With The Moon, The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies, Star Power, The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies and Supreme Healing. Visit: spiritualgenius.com and HeartEasy.com for more information.

Million Hearts And EatingWell Magazine Launch Heart-Healthy Nutrition Resource

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saltshakerThe Million Hearts initiative announces the launch of a new Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Resource Center, developed in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and EatingWell magazine. The resource center features lower-sodium, heart-healthy recipes and family-friendly meal plans, with an emphasis on managing sodium intake, a major contributor to high blood pressure and heart disease.

By helping individuals and families access content and recipes to promote consumption of healthier foods, this consumer-friendly addition to existing Million Hearts tools supports the initiative’s goal of preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes.

“Because sodium is a major contributor to high blood pressure, it is important to help people understand how they can manage sodium intake at home,” said Janet S. Wright, MD, FACC, Executive Director of Million Hearts. “This online resource offers practical, accessible eating and lifestyle-based solutions for people looking for ways to reduce sodium in their diet and create heart-healthy, tasty meals for themselves and their families.”

All the recipes featured in the resource center include nutritional facts and use everyday ingredients found at local supermarkets and have been tested by EatingWell’s test kitchen. Search and filter options make it easier to quickly find the right meal based on prep time, cuisine, course, and number of servings. The meal plans are flexible, easy to use, convenient, and can be customized to an individual’s dietary needs.

saladplate“This resource helps people see that it’s not about giving up the food you love, but choosing lower sodium options that taste great,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the CDC. “Small changes can make a big difference. We can prevent 11 million cases of high blood pressure each year if everyone reduced their daily sodium intake to 2,300 mg.”

To learn more about the Million Hearts Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Resource Center, visit recipes.millionhearts.hhs.gov/. Million Hearts is a joint initiative of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. For more information about the initiative and to access resources, visit millionhearts.hhs.gov.

About Million Hearts

Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. Million Hearts brings together communities, health systems, nonprofit organizations, federal agencies, and private-sector partners from across the country to fight heart disease and stroke.

The Role Model In You – Adrienne Smith, Elite Athlete And Media Entrepreneur

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Role Model

The Role Model In You
Today’s Guest – Adrienne Smith

1. Your name, title, and age? What do you do (or did you do) for a living?

My name is Adrienne Smith. I am an elite athlete and media entrepreneur. I am a member of the U.S. women’s national tackle football team, the U.S. women’s national flag football team, and the Boston Militia (www.bostonmilitia.com – a pro women’s football team in Boston). As for my career, I operate two companies: Harlem Hip-Hop Tours (www.h3tours.com) and Gridiron Queendom (www.gridironqueendom.com).

Harlem Hip-Hop Tours is a tour company that provides educational field trips for schools and youth groups. The field trips focus on Harlem and NYC’s hip-hop industry. All of the field trips are “edutainment” in nature as they educate students about entrepreneurship, history, and the arts, while entertaining them as well.

Gridiron Queendom is a sports and edutainment company that provides online and live action content and events geared towards women and girls who play and/or are fans of American football.

2. Who was the person that inspired you as a child to eat healthy and stay fit? What was their relationship to you?

As a child, my mother was instrumental in teaching me to eat healthy and stay fit. She was a home economist and studied nutrition in college. My mother was a superb cook and always ensured that I ate healthy meals, every day of the week. I was an athlete by nature and she always encouraged me to play outside versus playing videogames indoors, and was an integral part of the genesis of my love for organized sports.

3. What did they do to inspire you?

My mother led by example. She always ate right and loved to run. My father also served as an exemplary role model. He was an avid tennis player and kept playing tennis well into his 60s.

4. How did their lesson change your life?

healthyheartThe example my parents set showed me that health was a lifestyle. Eating right and exercising is not something you do on the weekends, or when you’re trying to fit into a certain dress. Staying fit and eating healthy is a way of life. It just became the way I lived – plain and simple. I’ve never dieted, nor done some crazy workout regiment. My mother and father showed me through their lives, the benefits of continual exercise and eating right.

5. Do you convey their message to kids in your life presently?

Absolutely! As a professional football player it is imperative that I stay fit and make healthy eating choices. I have lots of girls and boys who look up to me and want to know how I achieved my athletic success. Whether I am speaking at a school, or coaching a football clinic, I always teach children that the first step to success is eating the right food. The body requires foods such as fruits, vegetables, and protein to perform at its best. I also teach that exercise is not only good for the body, but it also is important for stimulating the mind.

6. What would be your main message to children today to lead healthy lifestyles?

In addition to telling kids about the best foods for them to eat and the importance of playing outside or joining sports teams, I also tell them it is important to talk to their parents about eating right and exercising. Most children are at the mercy of their parents in terms of what food they eat. I try to reinforce and encourage kids to talk to their parents about eating healthily and to go on family outings such as hiking or bike riding so the whole family can adopt a healthy lifestyle.

7. Do you have a web site you would like to promote….web address only?

h3tours.com

The Role Model In You – Tim Sinclair, U-Be-Livin-Smart Co-founder

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Role Model

The Role Model In You
Today’s Guest – Tim Sinclair

1. Your name, title, and age? What do you do (or did you do) for a living?

Name: Tim Sinclair

Title: Co-Founder

Age: North of 45 – South of 50 – Feel 30

Living: Advocate healthy living and nutrient dense food products at U-Be-Livin-Smart. Company Mission is to provide the best of all Nutrient Dense products while being able help feed 88 Million underprivileged-undernourished in all the communities across North America where U-Be-Livin-Smart product is sold. Work to be a better person every day and influence those around me to be the same.

2. Who was the person that inspired you as a child to eat healthy and stay fit? What was their relationship to you?

My mother and my wife for two very different reasons. My motivation has come from experiencing first-hand how unhealthy (and healthy) choices shape families and people. There is a physical toll, of course, but the emotional toll always seems to be greater. My mom was a single parent, raising six children. She chain-smoked to survive her long days of work and raising my siblings and me. She passed away too young. Conversely, Sherri, my wife, always has found ways to “go for a walk” even in busiest time. Which seems to be every moment, as we raise four children who are 4 1/2 years apart in age (13-12-11-9).

3. What did they do to inspire you?

There is no single thing that my mom or wife did or do to inspire me – they are just themselves. In my opinion, actions always speak louder than words and if you really look and listen you can be inspired in the most surprising ways.

4. How did their lesson change your life?

As a self-diagnosed “Type A” personality, they have taught me to better understand that we can only live now and that planning for the future is pointless if you don’t have your mental and physical health. They motivated me to explore how and what balance means for me.

5. Do you convey their message to kids in your life presently?

I do. I am still learning to “walk the walk” and our 13-year old is quick to call me out when I’m contradicting myself. Obviously, this is somewhat frustrating, and a lot humbling. It’s great to know that at least the message is getting across.

6. What would be your main message to children today to lead healthy lifestyles?

You have the ability to choose everything that you do, hear, feel and see. Respect your body and mind. Understand that just because “we can” doesn’t always mean “we should”.

7. Do you have a web site you would like to promote….web address only?

ubelivinsmart.com