New Study Shows Combatting Childhood Obesity In Schools Is Working

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

obesityResearch Finds the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program Reduces Prevalence of Childhood Obesity.

According to a recently published study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal, Preventing Chronic Disease, schools can win the fight against childhood obesity. The study found that the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program is an important means of supporting schools in reducing students’ rates of obesity.

Effect of the Healthy Schools Program on Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in California Schools, 2006 – 2012, is the first peer-reviewed journal article published about the Healthy Schools Program’s impact on child obesity rates.

An analysis of 281 schools in California that participated in the Program from 2006-2012 concludes that the Program is “an effective model for addressing childhood obesity among engaged schools,” and that meaningful participation in the Program is linked to reductions in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among students in high-need schools.

Ten years ago, the Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association founded the Alliance for a Healthier Generation with the goal of reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity, and this study confirms the organization is delivering on its mission and that healthy school environments are having an effect on student weight.

“It’s encouraging to see the proven positive impact of the Healthy Schools Program on childhood obesity. Over the past ten years, the Alliance involved all stakeholders ‒ schools, companies, communities, healthcare professionals and families. The combination of commitment and cooperation has made the difference,” said President Bill Clinton.

kidsexercisevector“This study is evidence of our 2005 dream realized. While we know we have much more work to do to reverse the tide of obesity, we’re showing signs of success through the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.

The Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program, which was launched in 2006 with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provides schools with a framework, assessment and action plan, as well as virtual and onsite training and technical assistance and access to national experts to help them create sustainable healthy change. While the study looked at schools in California, the Program serves more than 29,000 schools nationally, the majority of which are high-need ‒ 40% or more of a school’s students receive free or reduced price lunch.

The study demonstrates the power of providing high-quality training and technical assistance to help schools make policy and system changes that improve children’s access to healthy foods and physical activity. The more that schools engaged with the Healthy Schools Program, and the longer they engaged, the greater reductions they saw in student rates of obesity. For example, for each additional year of exposure to an Alliance national advisor, schools saw a nearly 2% decline in student rates of overweight and obesity.

“Healthy school environments are critical to ensuring that every child grows up at a healthy weight and to RWJF’s goal of building a nationwide Culture of Health,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “This study reinforces the critical role that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program can play in making a healthy school the norm and not the exception in the United States. We are proud of our commitment to initiate and expand the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program over the past decade, and we look forward to continued progress in our joint efforts to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic.”

“We’re pleased the findings confirm that the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program is delivering on our mission: to reduce the prevalence of childhood obesity,” said Dr. Howell Wechsler, CEO of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. “Reaching more than 17 million students across the country and growing, we will continue to positively impact children’s health on a national scale.”

About the Alliance for a Healthier Generation
The Alliance for a Healthier Generation empowers kids to develop lifelong, healthy habits. Through our Healthy Schools Program, we help to build healthier school environments for more than 17 million students by improving physical education, health education, child nutrition, and staff wellness policies and programs in more than 29,000 schools. Learn more and join the movement at http://www.healthiergeneration.org.

About the Clinton Foundation
The Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change. Because of our work, more than 29,000 American schools are providing kids with healthy food choices in an effort to eradicate childhood obesity; more than 85,000 farmers in Malawi, Rwanda, and Tanzania are benefiting from climate-smart agronomic training, higher yields, and increased market access; more than 33,500 tons of greenhouse gas emissions are being reduced annually across the United States; over 350,000 people have been impacted through market opportunities created by social enterprises in Latin America, the Caribbean, and South Asia; through the independent Clinton Health Access Initiative, 9.9 million people in more than 70 countries have access to CHAI-negotiated prices for HIV/AIDS medications; 75 million people are benefiting from disease prevention efforts and investments in the U.S.; and members of the Clinton Global Initiative community have made more than 3,200 Commitments to Action, which have improved the lives of over 430 million people in more than 180 countries. Learn more at http://www.clintonfoundation.org, on Facebook at Facebook.com/ClintonFoundation and on Twitter @ClintonFdn.

About the American Heart Association
The American Heart Association (AHA) is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke—America’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers. The American Heart Association team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of the offices around the country.

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
For more than 40 years the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has worked to improve health and health care. The Foundation strives to build a national Culture of Health that will enable all to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come. For more information, visit http://www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter at http://www.rwjf.org/twitter or on Facebook at http://www.rwjf.org/facebook.

New Research Study Goes Against Popular Belief On “39-week” Pregnancy Rule

Share Button

pregnantThis article is courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your comments below. Questions or concerns about the article should be addressed directly to the Baylor College of Medicine.

Women who are managing low-risk pregnancies are advised to follow the “39-week rule” – waiting until they are 39 weeks to deliver. This rule is intended to eliminate elective inductions and cesarean deliveries at 37 and 38 weeks, when outcomes for the newborns are believed to be worse than those born at full term.

But new research by a Baylor College of Medicine epidemiologist suggests that babies delivered after elective induction at 37 to 38 weeks may not have an increased risk of adverse neonatal outcomes, compared to those infants who are expectantly managed (i.e., medical observation or “watchful waiting”) and delivered at 39 to 40 weeks. The findings appear in the current issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“Our findings caution against a general avoidance of all elective early-term inductions and call for continued research, based on better data, in what is still a relatively new arena,” said Dr. Jason Salemi, assistant professor of family and community medicine at Baylor and lead author of the study.

The national initiative to eliminate all elective deliveries before 39 weeks began to gain momentum around 2008, Salemi said, and was supported by professional organizations and adopted by healthcare institutions.

“Until then, I had never observed a campaign so enthusiastically embraced and that resulted in such widespread implementation of practice improvement efforts,” Salemi said.

But he saw limitations in many studies used to justify the 39-week rule. Most notably, he recognized what he believed to be an inappropriate choice of comparison group for elective early-term deliveries.

“A number of studies reporting worse outcomes for elective early-term deliveries compared them with later term spontaneous deliveries, a low-risk group. However, the clinical decision that must be made is not between elective early-term delivery and later spontaneous delivery, but between elective early-term delivery and expectant management, in which the outcome remains unknown,” Salemi said.

Salemi and his colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study that used data on more than 675,000 infants from a statewide database. All live births were classified on the basis of the timing and reason for delivery. The research study compared elective inductions and cesarean deliveries at 37 to 38 weeks to expectantly managed pregnancies delivered at 39 to 40 weeks.

“We focused on serious conditions in early life. Our outcomes included neonatal respiratory morbidity, sepsis, feeding difficulties, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit and infant mortality,” Salemi said.

Salemi cautions that the research findings do not lend support for elective deliveries before 39 weeks and, in fact, provide evidence that supports the avoidance of elective early-term cesarean deliveries. The study found that infants delivered after cesarean delivery at 37 to 38 weeks had a 13 to 66 percent increase in the odds of damaging outcomes.

However, infants delivered after elective early-term induction experienced odds of adverse neonatal outcomes that were largely the same as infants who were expectantly managed and delivered at 39 to 40 weeks. Through the research findings, Salemi hopes to increase awareness on the many issues that surround the timing and reasons for delivery.

“Each pregnancy is unique,” He said. “I cannot overstate the importance of open and ongoing communication between pregnant women and their healthcare providers so that the potential risks and benefits of any pregnancy-related decision are understood fully.”

Other authors that contributed to this research study and article are Dr. Elizabeth Pathak, during her time as an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, and Dr. Hamisu Salihu, professor and vice chair for research in family and community medicine at Baylor.

This research was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (grant number R01HS019997).

New Study Reveals America’s Fear Of Aging

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

seniormanAegis Living Study Says Women More Likely to Worry About Memory than Men – More Funding for Alzheimer’s Research Urgently Needed

According to a new Aegis Living Study on Attitudes Toward Aging, adults of all generations are equally as likely to worry about what will happen to their memory as they age (72% Millennials, 75% Gen X, 77% Boomers, 69% Silent Generation), which may help explain why nearly half of all adults (45%) agree they are scared of aging, particularly Millennials (47%), Gen X’ers (51%), and Boomers (43%). The study was conducted online by Harris Poll in April, 2015 among more than 2,000 U.S. adults ages 18+.

“This study shines a light on a national issue that demands more attention. The more we’re aware of Alzheimer’s and dementia, the more research funding will start to flow. It simply has to,” says Dr. Shirley Newell, Aegis Living Chief Medical Officer. “We wanted to get a handle on what America is thinking about regarding an issue that faces our residents every day. And that’s what we have with these new numbers.”

Women More Worried than Men
The study also reveals that women are more likely than men to worry about what will happen to their memory as they age (77% vs. 70%, respectively) and be scared of aging (48% vs. 41%, respectively), and their fears may not be unfounded. The majority of Aegis Living residents are women and according to the Alzheimer’s Association, two-thirds of the 5 million seniors with Alzheimer’s disease are women. Women in their 60’s are about twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease over the rest of their lives as they are to develop breast cancer. The Alzheimer’s Association https://alz.org/abam/ has designated June as Alzheimer’s Awareness and Brain Awareness Month.

More Funding Urgently Needed for Alzheimer’s Research
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, U.S. direct cost of caring for people with Alzheimer’s in 2015 is $226 billion. By 2050, it will skyrocket to $1.2 trillion. Last year, more than $5 billion was spent on cancer research. $4 billion was spent on heart disease research and yet only $500 million was devoted to Alzheimer’s research.

Top Five Signs of Dementia

http://www.aegisliving.com/resource-center/5-signs-of-dementia/

1. Problems with Vision
2. Mood and Personality Changes
3. Poor Judgement and Difficulty Making Decisions
4. Misplacing or Losing Things
5. Forgetfulness

(Dementia is an umbrella term for a decline in mental ability that is necessary for day-to-day function. Although there is no specific disease related to dementia, Alzheimer’s accounts for 60-80 percent of all cases of mental decline – Alzheimer’s Association)

About the Survey
The survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Aegis Living, between April 23rd and April 27th, 2015 among 2,015 U.S. adults ages 18+. For complete research method, including weighting variables and subgroup sample sizes, please contact John Yeager at Aegis Living John.Yeager(at)aegisliving(dot)com

About Aegis Living
Aegis Living is a national leader in retirement, assisted living and Alzheimer’s care providing the finest in senior lifestyle emphasizing health, quality of life, well-being and community. Aegis Living is guided by a simple philosophy: strive to treat all people with the highest possible standards. Founded in 1997 and headquartered in Redmond, Washington, privately held Aegis Living operates 30 communities in Washington, California and Nevada with 7 in development, including Aegis of Queen Anne on Galer. Many Aegis Living residents live with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia.

Media Contact: John Yeager Public Relations Director Aegis Living 425-765-9845 (complete methodology available at John.Yeager(at)aegislving(dot)com). http://www.AegisLiving.com Follow us on Twitter @aegisliving and Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/AegisLiving

New Asthma & Obesity Study Tracks 10,000 Patients

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

didyouknow?Asthma Control Requires Weight Loss Management in At-Risk Individuals

Although studies have shown an association between obesity and increased asthma incidence, the role of obesity in asthma control is less clear. Now, researchers have addressed that issue by tracking asthma control and Body Mass Index (BMI) in a large, real world cohort of 10,233 adults.

“We identified adults with persistent asthma in 2006, continuous health plan enrollment in 2007 and 2008, with a BMI measurement in 2006 and 2007. That BMI was categorized and analyzed alongside asthma control outcomes in 2008,” co-author Michael Schatz, MD, MS, FAAAAI, said.

Asthma control outcomes included asthma hospitalizations or emergency department visits, oral corticosteroid prescriptions linked to an asthma encounter and prescriptions for more than seven short-acting beta-agonist canisters.

“We found an increased risk of emergency department visits or asthma related hospital stays in overweight (26-40%) and obese individuals (36-57%). We also found that obese patients are likelier to use seven or more short-acting beta-agonist canisters,” co-author Robert Zeiger, MD, PhD, FAAAAI said.

A number of reasons could explain the relationship between poor asthma control and obesity, including:

* Gastroesophageal reflux disease

* Depression

* Reduced corticosteroid responsiveness

* Adipokines or cell signaling proteins secreted by body fat

* Direct effects on pulmonary functions

The size of this study allowed the investigators to account for some of these factors (gastroesophageal reflux disease, depression, and inhaled corticosteroid treatment) as well as other factors that influence asthma control (age, gender, smoking and socioeconomic status). This large study will provide medical professionals a more comprehensive understanding of the association between elevated BMI and poor asthma control. It is important because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that more than one in three adults over the age of 20 are obese. Similarly, more than two in three adults over the age of 20 are overweight or obese.

“While further studies will be needed to better define the amount of weight loss necessary to improve asthma outcomes, it remains clear that physicians managing overweight and obese patients with asthma should actively encourage and facilitate weight loss interventions,” Schatz explained.

The study was published on May 11, 2015 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (JACI: In Practice), an official journal of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). It should be noted that this study was supported by a research grant from Merck and Co. Inc.

More information on asthma is available at AAAAI.org. The AAAAI represents allergists, asthma specialists, clinical immunologists, allied health professionals and others with a special interest in the research and treatment of allergic and immunologic diseases. Established in 1943, the AAAAI has more than 6,800 members in the United States, Canada and 72 other countries. The AAAAI’s Find an Allergist/Immunologist service is a trusted resource to help you find a specialist close to home.

American College Of Sports Medicine Installs New Officers

Share Button

Thank you to ACSM for supplying this article…..

womanweightsThe American College of Sports Medicine installed its officers for 2016-17 at the organization’s annual meeting in Boston, Mass. Lawrence A. Armstrong, Ph.D., FACSM, 2015-16 president, passed the gavel to Elizabeth A. Joy, MD, MPH, FACSM as the 59th president of ACSM. Dr. Joy is a physician practicing at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City.

In addition to serving as medical director for Community Health and Clinical Nutrition at Intermountain Healthcare, Dr. Joy practices family medicine and sports medicine at the Salt Lake LiVe Well Center, and is an adjunct professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. She has previously served as vice president, and on the Board of Trustees of ACSM, and was on the Board of Trustees for the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine. She is on the editorial board for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine and is an associate editor for Current Sports Medicine Reports.

Walter R. Thompson, Ph.D., FACSM, of Georgia State University was installed as president-elect. Holly Benjamin, M.D., FACSM, of University of Chicago and William Kraus, M.D., FACSM of Duke University’s School of Medicine were installed as vice presidents. A complete list of ACSM’s new officers and trustees can be viewed here.

The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 50,000 international, national and regional members and certified professionals are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine.

Nutritionist Comments On New FDA Trans Fat Regulations

Share Button

Article courtesy of K-State News & Communications Services…..

http://yourhealthjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kickhabit.jpgThe Food and Drug Administration has announced that partially hydrogenated oils, which are the primary dietary source of trans fat, are not “generally recognized as safe” for use in food. This ruling comes two years after the FDA’s first tentative determination of the same finding and a request for comments on the matter. The FDA has given the food industry until 2018 to stop using partially hydrogenated oils and fats in processed food products.

Mary Meck Higgins, a Kansas State University associate professor of human nutrition and an expert in food and nutrition, discusses what the announcement means for nutrition and the food industry.

Expert name: Mary Meck Higgins

Expertise: Kansas State University associate professor of human nutrition, K-State Research and Extension specialist, fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and

Dietetics, registered dietitian and licensed dietitian

Website: http://www.he.k-state.edu/hn/people/faculty/higgins/

Comments/quotes:

What is trans fat?

“The primary dietary source of trans fat is partially hydrogenated oils. These oils are produced by a process called hydrogenation, where some hydrogen is added to a liquid vegetable oil, which converts it into a solid when it’s at room temperature. Partially hydrogenated oils and fats, and thus artificial trans fat, have been in many processed foods for the past 60 years. They are used to improve the shelf life, texture and flavor stability of a processed food.”

“Foods sold without a nutrition facts or ingredients label do not have partially hydrogenated oils or artificial trans fat in them. Small amounts — typically about 2 to 3 percent — of naturally occurring trans fat may be found in some cooking oils and in the fat component of dairy and meat products from ruminant animals, such as cattle, sheep and goats.”

What does this announcement mean?

“Food companies will have three years to stop using partially hydrogenated oils and fats in their processed food products. After that, there should no longer be artificial trans fat in our food supply.”

Why is it important?

“Eating partially hydrogenated oils and partially hydrogenated fats is a strong risk factor for getting heart disease, which is the No. 1 cause of death for men and women in the U.S. They contribute to the buildup of plaque inside the arteries that may cause a heart attack. Eliminating them from the food supply should prevent thousands of deadly heart attacks each year and fewer people will get heart disease.”

“Currently, eliminating trans fat from one’s diet entirely is all but impossible because it’s practically unavoidable in the U.S. diet. People would also have to spend lots of time reading two kinds of food labels. The nutrition facts label shows how many grams of trans fat are in one serving of each processed food. In many instances though, a food that is made with partially hydrogenated oils has too little trans fat in it per serving to be listed on the nutrition facts label. For foods showing 0 grams trans fat, one must then look at the mostly small-print ingredients list. If a partially hydrogenated oil or fat is listed as an ingredient, then that food does contain a small amount of trans fat. The new FDA ruling will eliminate the need to have to do all of this, since partially hydrogenated oils will no longer be in our food supply once it goes into effect.”

What else should we know about this announcement?

“Food companies have three years to eliminate partially hydrogenated oils and fats from their products. Until then, check ingredient lists of foods — especially frozen pizzas, coffee creamers, stick margarines, microwave popcorn, crackers, cookies, refrigerated dough products, cakes, packaged pies, ready to use frostings and nutrition bars — and avoid those brands that contain partially hydrogenated oils and fats.”

“To further reduce risk of heart disease, people should limit dietary saturated fats. On average, people living in the U.S. eat four to five times as much saturated fat as trans fat.”

How can a person reduce dietary saturated fat?

“Eat at least three one-ounce servings of whole grains and 4 1/2 cups of fruits and vegetables a day. Eat seafood — including oily fish — and cooked dry beans and peas in place of some meat and poultry. Choose skinless poultry. For beef and pork, choose lean cuts — such as loin — and at least 90 percent lean ground. Limit intake of fatty meats, such as sausage, franks, bacon and ribs. In addition, choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, cheeses and other dairy products. Cook and bake with liquid oils instead of shortenings, butter and lard.”

New Study Links Endometriosis To Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

Share Button

By Tamer Seckin, MD

didyouknow?A new study out today is linking endometriosis to a higher risk of heart disease, particularly among women aged 40 years and under. The data shows that women in this age bracket are three times more likely to develop heart attack, chest pain or blocked arteries when compared to those without endometriosis of the same age. “This should be of real concern to doctor’s treating patients with endometriosis,” said Dr. Tamer Seckin, one of a handful of gynecologic surgeons in the United States who performs deep excision of endometriosis and is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi.

The study, published today in the Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association Journal, looked at the heart risk for women with endometriosis over a 20-year period. The study followed 120,000 women, of which about nearly 12,000 had endometriosis, and found that compared to women without endometriosis women with endometriosis were 1.35 times more likely to need surgery or stenting to open blocked arteries, 1.52 times more likely to have a heart attack and nearly two times as likely to develop angina.

“Studies on endometriosis are greatly needed, and I am pleased to see this research supported by the National Institute of Health,” said Seckin. Dr. Stacey Missmer, director of epidemiologic research and reproductive medicine at Brigham’s Women’s Hospital, who co-authored the study, spoke last year at the EFA’s 6th annual medical conference held in New York City.

According to the study, researchers noted that surgical treatment of endometriosis including the removal of the uterus and ovaries possibly accounts for the higher risk of heart disease. Seckin says this has been suspected for some time and is not a surprise to him. The study also reported that surgically induced menopause before natural menopause may also be an added risk.

The peer-reviewed paper also says that there is a specific and meaningful correlation between endometriosis and coronary heart disease. Seckin believes this may be due to the confounding systemic inflammation and chronic stress and pain.

Dr. Seckin urges that removal of the uterus and/or ovaries is not the optimal treatment for women with endometriosis. That is why he opts for deep excision surgery. Excision allows the surgeon to safely and successfully remove the disease and the inflammatory tissues.

“Deep excision surgery is about removing the endometriosis tissue from the body and preserving both the reproductive organs, and any other organs affected by the disease, as endometriosis often grows outside the reproductive tract in places like the bowel and colon,” said Seckin. “Treatment should offer a woman the best chance to regain a pain-free life, lessen long-term side effects from alternative therapies used to treat symptoms, and provide an opportunity for her to have children.”

Alternative therapies can include the use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and painkillers for treating patients with endometriosis. The study did account for oral contraceptive and hormone replacement exposure but could not evaluate details of other hormonal treatments or the use of painkillers.

While he is busy advocating that the reproductive organs not be removed during endometriosis treatment, Seckin also expresses concerns about the dangers of long-term usage of hormones and pain medications. “These therapies have their risks,” he added.“Whether-or-not heart disease is one of these dangers, or the disease itself is the cause has still to be determined, but this study tells us something is increasing the risk for heart disease in women with endometriosis.”

Seckin said that the study convinces him that removing the disease through minimally invasive surgery gives women the most relief from their symptoms and does not expose them to side-effects that could put their overall health at risk.

– Tamer Seckin, MD, is an endometriosis specialist and surgeon in private practice in New York at Lenox Hill Hospital. He is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi. The EFA mission is to increase disease recognition, provide advocacy, facilitate expert surgical training, and fund landmark endometriosis research. Dr. Seckin is the author of “The Doctor Will See You Now; Recognizing and Treating Endometriosis” published March 2016 by Turner Publishing.

Harvard Launches New Program For Educators

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

newsApplications are now being received for Books, Movies, and Civic Engagement, a professional education offering on campus at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, June 20 – 24, 2016.

The program will convene teachers, media specialists, school leaders, after-school program leaders, and others committed to using transmedia storytelling – telling a single story across multiple media platforms – to help young people engage with challenging cultural and social justice issues.

“It’s like a film festival for educators,” said Tonya Lewis Lee, who has joined the program faculty along with Nikki Silver, her Chief Co-Creator at ToniK Productions. The two will discuss their process and objectives in adapting The Watsons Go To Birmingham for television, along with their brand new project – a film adaptation of Walter Dean Meyers’ novel, Monster. Faculty will also explore transmedia opportunities for Fun Home and Hamilton, both currently very popular on Broadway.

The explosion of books across genres being adapted for the screen (e.g., biography, dystopia, historical fiction) has created exciting new opportunities to employ transmedia storytelling in support of student learning and development. Harvard Graduate School of Education Faculty Co-Chair Robert Selman explains that the program is designed to explore intertextuality, “a term that points to the way different sectors, genres, and media can all come together to promote and enrich storytelling…and build knowledge and sophistication.”

Activities will include plenary sessions, film screenings, and protocols for dialogic instruction — informal conversation between students and teachers to stimulate thinking and advance understanding. Participants will examine issues and stories that are relevant to today’s students in a variety of workshops and explore ways different content platforms can tell the same (or similar) stories.

Faculty co-chairs:

Joe Blatt, senior lecturer on education and faculty director, Technology, Innovation, and Education Program, HGSE Robert Selman, Roy Edward Larsen professor of education and human development, HGSE, and professor of psychology, Harvard Medical School.

Randy Testa, former vice president of education and professional development, Walden Media Tracy Elizabeth, doctoral candidate in Human Development and Education at HGSE.

BMCE is one of 50+ programs for K-12 teachers and school leaders offered annually, online and on campus, at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Additional program information and application details are available at: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/ppe/programs

3 Things To Look For In A New Dentist

Share Button

By Staci Rae

dentistIn order to have great looking teeth, you will have to put in a lot of work. The only way you will be able to keep your luminous smile, you will need to find the right dental professional in your area. With all of the many options when it comes to dentists in any given area, finding the right one will take some time and effort. You need to make a list of what you are looking for in a dentist and then go out in search of the right professional to fit the bill. Here are a few things you have to look for in a dentist office.

Knowledge and Vast Experience

The first thing you have to look for in a dentist is experience and a vast amount of knowledge about their chosen profession. The more you are able to find out about a dentist and how long they have been around, the easier you will find it to choose the right one. Make sure to do your own research to verify anything you are being told by a particular dentist.

A Great Staff

Another very important thing you have to consider when trying to find the right dentist is the type of staff they have. In order to get a feel for the staff at a particular dentist’s office you will need to schedule a consultation. By getting a firsthand look at what a particular dentist office can offer, you will be able to make the right choice. Be sure to weigh all of the options you have so you can get the full scope of what is out there. The time you spend going to these different dentist’s offices will be more than worth it.

Knowing Their Cost on Procedures Performed

If you do not have insurance, you need to think about how much you are going to have to pay for the procedures you need. The time you spend doing the research on this factor is worth it when you are able to adequately budget yourself. Make sure you call around to as many different offices as you can to get a feel for what the going rate for dental work is in your area. The more you can find out about this, the easier you will find it to get the right dentist chosen in your area.

The right dentist will be able to help you keep your teeth in pristine condition with ease. The time invested in this process will pay off in the end.

– Staci has been a freelance writer and editor for more than 15 years. She has worked on a wide variety of projects for a kaleidoscope of clients, from websites and guest blog posts to academic writing and ghostwriting 3 fiction books. She lives in Ontario, Canada with her husband and their 8-year-old daughter. She also writes articles for a dental office in Scarborough.

New Bacteria-Resistant Fitness Towel

Share Button

exerciseballTowel Tech’s groundbreaking new gym towel calls on breakthrough fiber technology to resist bacteria and microbes, while at the same time exceeding the functionality of most existing fitness towel products. From its sleek zippered mesh pocket and color-coded sides to a powerful small magnet that allows it to attach to the side of equipment rather than lie on the floor – Towel Tech is a game-changer set to help thousands avoid contracting colds and the flu from their local health club.

While most gym-goers pay their monthly fee to work towards improving their health, millions hate using the gym during wintertime for its somewhat magic ability to harvest debilitating cold and flu viruses. And the culprit? Wiping down equipment with the last guy’s infected sweat! But one California-based team may have solved this conundrum with what could be the world’s most revolutionary towel.

They have aptly titled it ‘Towel Tech’; a gym towel made from a state-of-the-art combination patented fiber called TENCEL®. It’s naturally resistant to most forms of bacteria and microbes, allowing fitness fanatics to wipe down gym equipment and themselves, without the inherent risk of contracting a virus.

“Public gyms and fitness centers are riddled not only with cold and flu bacteria, but just about any disease that can live in someone’s sweat. For decades people have been trying to avoid getting sick from the gym, and what they often don’t realize is that their trusty gym towel is its own worst enemy,” says Henry Cohn, co-founder of Towel Tech. “So, we tasked ourselves with creating a towel that can hygienically be used to wipe down equipment, wipe ourselves and do it all while resisting bacteria.”

Continuing, “It is eco-friendly, highly-absorbent and dries almost twice as fast as any other towel on the market. The new age materials and elite functionality fuse to create something that is not only useful, but something that actually works.”

Towel Tech’s breakthroughs stretch far and beyond its bacteria resistance. A convenient zippered mesh pocket allows for easy storage of small items while working out, along with a tiny powerful magnet that allows the towel to hygienically stay attached to equipment/lockers and off the floor.

But perhaps the most ingenious extra feature comes from simple color-coded sides.

“The towel’s reverse-color design allows users to remember which side to use to wipe down equipment and which side to use for their body. This further enhances Towel Tech’s hygiene mandate. It has to be the “safest” towel in the world!”

Towel Tech is already being used by thousands of gym users, athletes, personal trainers and even professional sportspeople. Many have come out with rave reviews.

Zack K. from Huntington Beach comments, “I don’t have to empty my shorts before hopping on the leg press or row and I can stash my gloves since I only use them on a few sets.”

Dan from Seattle bought Towel Tech for his wife. The results have blown him away: “Michelle is using it all the time – she’s in training to become a barre teacher for a second income and is at the gym most nights after work. She really likes the towel for sure. She goes to barre class 3-5X a week and uses it every time. So it’s seen regular use, and she’s happy to have it. The magnet is so darn strong – it’s a cool feature especially for athletes like her that are very germ-aware. And the barre studio is very Spartan. Nowhere to set anything down so the magnet is key.”

For more information on Towel Tech or to place an order, visit the official website: toweltech.com.

Product Specs: 26 inches X 16 inches, color: Grey/Silver, weight: 9 Ounces, made from eco-friendly 50 %TENCEL® (Lenzing AG of Austria) and 50% combed cotton, US Utility Patent Pending.

Towel Tech can also be seen in action on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1I2v1Nc.