Keeping Pregnant Mothers Safe From Blood Clots

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS). Please share your thoughts below…..

pregnantThe Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a podcast with Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC on keeping pregnant mothers safe from blood clots.

Preventing blood clots in pregnant mothers poses significant healthcare challenges. The risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers is almost ten times more likely than a non-pregnant woman. These patient safety risks increase for pregnant mothers who are obese. In the United States, more than two-thirds of adults are obese.

Because of the increased risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a podcast http://youtu.be/Um2BKewEWRg with Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC. Ms. Enslow is the Nurse Educator for the Women’s Health and Ambulatory Care Services at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut.

“Pregnant women are at a significantly higher risk than the general public for developing a blood clot simply because of the mechanisms that are in place to help them prevent hemorrhaging,” said Ms. Enslow. “So, our pregnant patients really need a lot more risk assessment during their hospitalization and even after discharge. If a blood clot is not detected or treated, it may become dislodged and travel up into the lung and that can create even more problems for the mom.”

In the podcast, Ms. Enslow discussed a case of a super morbidly obese pregnant mother. This mother had a BMI (body mass index) of 67. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal.

Four keys for managing the healthcare risk in obese pregnant mothers were identified during the podcast.

The first key – plan for the delivery.

Ms. Enslow explained the necessity of planning – “Pre-planning and communication between all of the team members is really key to achieving the most optimal clinical outcomes for patients with multiple challenging risk factors or individual characteristics. In specialties, such as obstetrics, we’re often faced with a complex patient that requires us to be really proactive and identifying risk factors early in the course of care. This type of preparedness is necessary to prevent adverse events and to identify individual risk factors that would best guide us in the management or plan for patients possible hospital acquired conditions or in adverse event prevention plans to achieve high quality outcomes.”

The second key – apply blood clot preventative measures.

Ms. Enslow described the measures taken in a case of super morbidly obese pregnant mother – “this patient fell into the high risk category for venous thromboembolism because of her multiple risk factors, including the high BMI, her gestational diabetes, her maternal age, or having a caesarean section. So, because of this, she was provided with sequential compression devices beginning in the operating room … [The sequential compression devices] stayed on throughout the recovery period in our PACU and also when the patient was transferred to the postpartum unit … We started chemical prophylaxis six hours following surgery for her and that was continued throughout her stay.”

The third key – preventing blood clots doesn’t stop when the mother leaves the hospital.

Ms. Enslow emphasized the importance of preventative measures when the mother returns to her home – “it’s important to remember that the commitment to prevent VTE doesn’t end when the patient is discharged. That’s why appropriate patient education is so important to help patients understand why they should comply with their care, with making sure they understand that they really need to continue taking their discharge medications. Our post-partum patients can get the sequential compression devices for use at home and need to keep all their follow-up appointments.”

The fourth key – use the OB VTE Safety Recommendations.

The OB VTE Safety Recommendation s were developed with the advice and counsel of a panel of experts brought together by the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety. They provide four concise steps that:

* Assess patients for VTE risk with an easy-to-use automated scoring system

* Provide the recommended prophylaxis regimen, depending on whether the mother is antepartum or postpartum.

* Reassess the patient every 24 hours or upon the occurrence of a significant event, like surgery.

* Ensure that the mother is provided appropriate VTE prevention education upon hospital discharge.

“Caring for Mrs M. was significantly helped by the guidance from the recently released OB VTE Safety Recommendations, which offers a fine clinical process that covers the entire continuum of care,” said Ms. Enslow.

The OB VTE Safety Recommendations are a free resource available on the PPAHS website – http://www.ppahs.org

The podcast was hosted by Pat Iyer, MSN, RN, LNCC. Ms. Iyer is a legal nurse consultant who provides education to healthcare providers about patient safety at http://www.patiyer.com.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org

Top 6 Super Foods For New Mothers

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By Mike Chapman

pregnantSummary: Congratulations to the new mommies there! While you have entered the new phase of life, with your happiness, you responsibilities have multiplied to a great number. Now you need to be very careful with everything, especially with your diet. Let’s find out what kind of super-food can make you feel better and healthy.

Hope you are enjoying this time. You have just brought a new life in the world and now most of your time goes with him. Your world revolves around the little baby and this at times leaves you wondering where your energy and time fly away. It is something what every new mom worries about. If you are also in the same dilemma, what to have and what not to, for increased energy level, here is the solution.

Have a look at the 5 super-food which can do wonder to your and the baby’s health together. Check out:

1. High-fiber cereal: The new mothers make sure you take a bowl at breakfast daily. This will surely satisfy your hunger and prevent you from a common problem in new moms, i.e. constipation. Due to breastfeeding hormones, the process of intestines slows down. You can take any general multi-bran cereals along with a dollop of low-fat yogurt. This combination serves your body with the right amount of calcium. Also you get probiotics (a good bacteria), which aid your digestive system.

2. Eggs: This one is a boon for the moms who really worry a lot about their post pregnancy weight. Having eggs in your daily diet helps you to shed baby weight. You can add it to breakfast and then you can cut down the high calories for rest of the day. Do you know that a single egg has 5 or 6 grams of filling protein approximately? Thus, it will stop those munchies you are forced to have after few hours. Along this, eggs are known to be one of nature’s best sources of choline. As all nutrients are passed to your infant through the breast milk, this will be greatly helpful in building the memory center of a baby’s brain.

3. Salmon: It has been known for its amazing nutritional value. Containing a high amount of a fat, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), salmon helps in development of your newborn’s nervous system. It is a rich source of protein and vitamin B12. Thus, it will prevent you from postpartum depression. You can add two main servings of salmon in a week. In addition, add wild and fresh salmon rather than the frozen one.

4. Brown Rice: You are in love with the rice. No problem, but you need to switch to the brown option. These are healthy whole-grain carbohydrates, and are something very important for all new mothers. Include them to your diet as it helps you keep your energy level high and make your blood sugar level consistent. As compared to white rice, it has more fiber and other essential nutrients which help in increasing the breast milk supply and quality.

5. Nuts and seeds: Packed with high nutrition, they serve as a great source of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein, fiber, and monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. You need to add them to your daily need. It will protect you from heart diseases. Also it works as an anti-aging agent, which is highly useful for your skin. Always keep a handful of almonds or an apple with almond butter with you.

fruitswhite6. Blueberries: New mothers need to add blueberries to their diet. Being a rich agent of antioxidants, these fruits help you to destroy the free radicals. It is beneficial for you and your baby, and protects you both from several diseases. Having vitamins and minerals in abundance, a nursing mother needs healthy dose of carbohydrates and blueberries are the most apt food. You can include two or more servings of the juicy berries daily.

Consuming them in the right amount will get the energy to look after your newborn and also help you retain your figure back. Isn’t that all you have been looking for!

Mike Chapman is Health and fitness consultant associated with Dr. Scabies providing professional advice to seekers on dermal issues. He is also passionate about writing on Health, Fitness and Natural remedies. He love to shares his experience in his words with online followers, visitors and friends.

Expectant Mothers Often Experience An Achy Back

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Dr. Fabien Bitan of Atlantic Spine Center. Please share your comments below…..

pregnantDr. Fabien Bitan with Atlantic Spine Center explains why back pain occurs during pregnancy and offers tip to alleviate the problem.

Day or night, a growing baby is always with its pregnant mother. So too, for a large percentage of expecting women, is back pain, a not-so-happy but highly common consequence of pregnancy, according to Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Fabien Bitan with Atlantic Spine Center.

Between 50% and 70% of all pregnant women experience back pain, and not just in the later months as their growing belly causes dramatic shifts in posture, according to the American Pregnancy Association. A combination of factors – both preventable and unavoidable – contribute to the prevalence of aching backs among expectant moms.

“For these women, back pain can disrupt their days and get in the way of a good night’s sleep, which is so important to counteract the physical demands of pregnancy,” says Dr. Bitan. “Fortunately there are many techniques and interventions that can alleviate the problem, if not eliminate it altogether.”

Causes of pregnancy-related back pain

Women who are overweight or have experienced back pain before their pregnancy are even more likely than the average pregnant mom to develop the condition. But certain factors related to gestating a baby for nine months up the odds that women might develop back pain, Dr. Bitan says.

They include:

* Increasing hormone levels: To soften ligaments in the pelvic region in preparation for childbirth, the body releases a flood of hormones. This ligament-loosening sacroiliac joint-shifting can reduce normal levels of back support from these structures.

* Center of gravity shift: As the uterus become heavier, pregnant women tend to lean backward to compensate for their growing bellies. This posture change can make the back muscles work harder, leading to pain, soreness and stiffness.

* Weight gain: It’s a simple fact that the back must support perhaps dozens of extra pounds as pregnancy progresses, creating back strain.

* Stress: Worries about the growing fetus or changing family dynamics due to the new addition can manifest in back pain.

How expectant moms can minimize back pain

Not all pregnancy-related back pain can be prevented, but wearing flat shoes with good arch support is a good first step, Dr. Bitan notes. “Also consider investing in a firm mattress, which can provide extra support for your back during pregnancy,” he says.

Other ways expectant moms can reduce the odds of experiencing back pain include:

* Wearing a support belt under your lower abdomen.

* Using doctor-approved exercises that support and strengthen the back and abdomen.

* Picking up items by squatting and bending at the knees, not bending at the waist.

* Sitting in chairs with good back support, or using a small pillow behind the lower back.

If a pregnant woman develops an achy back despite her best efforts, Dr. Bitan advises common interventions such as applying ice or heat; using braces or other support devices such as a sacroiliac belt; and sleeping on her left side with a support pillow between the knees.

It’s important to note that severe back pain, or a backache that persists for longer than two weeks, may signify a bigger problem and mean it’s time to contact your health care provider, Dr. Bitan explains. Back pain can be a symptom of preterm labor or a urinary tract infection, both of which can be serious.

But for most women, the joys of pregnancy simply don’t include how their back may feel on any given day. “Back pain may be common during the nine months leading up to childbirth,” Dr. Bitan says, “but it doesn’t have to overshadow the big event if women do their best to avoid it and tackle an aching back with common-sense measures.”

Atlantic Spine Center is a nationally recognized leader for endoscopic spine surgery with several locations in NJ and NYC. http://www.atlanticspinecenter.com, http://www.atlanticspinecenter.nyc

Fabien Bitan, MD. Orthopedic Spine Surgeon with Atlantic Spine Center is a world renowned spine surgeon and leading expert in spinal instrumentation and artificial discs replacements.

Have A Heart Healthy Mother’s Day – Part 2

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

saladheartsmallPart Two: Ordering Heart Healthy in a Restaurant:
It’s Mom’s day so you want her to enjoy her outing. But remember that you’ll keep Mom around a lot longer if you follow a few heart healthy eating guidelines.

One excellent idea is to eat a healthy soup or salad before the entree. Healthy soups and salads can be filling and a good start for the meal. Avoid chowders such as clam, corn, split pea or potato and cheese. These are heavy on the butter and cream. Ask the waiter to describe what’s in the soup before ordering to check for saturated fats. Order a one cup serving and not a bowl.

If you’re choosing a salad remember that the salad isn’t usually the problem; the dressing is! Ask for a vegetable-heavy salad and the dressing on the side to control the amount you eat. Skip the creamy, fat-laden dressings and opt for the oil and vinegar, balsamic or fat free if they offer it. Stay away from sugary Asian dressings, unless you can check the ingredients, and avoid the staples like French, Blue Cheese, Thousand Island, or Ranch. You can also be heart-smart by mixing a small amount of olive oil and lemon juice yourself. Definitely skip the croutons, cheese toppings, crumbled bacon or tortilla chips.

If you are at a salad buffet choose lettuce and greens, such as spinach and vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, celery, bean sprouts, fresh peppers, a sprinkle of peas or corn, and a handful or red or black beans.

Taking Mom out for international cuisine? Try these heart healthy ordering tips:

riceWhen eating Chinese food you want to avoid dishes with gravies, items that are fried or deep fried and dishes that are coated and then fried or wok fried. Avoid fried rice and order brown rice instead. Do not pour the sodium-heavy sauces over the rice. If you want to taste the sauces (Hoisin, plum, sweet and sour or soy) dip your fork or chopstick into the sauce then collect a portion of rice with it to achieve just a taste. This will help you to avoid ingesting too much sodium.

Don’t order the egg rolls, the fried won tons, or any deep fried appetizers. Order a Chinese chicken salad, dressing on the side and ask them to hold the crispy won tons. Skip dishes that feature fatty nuts like cashew, macadamia or sugared walnuts. Order all other dishes with nuts on the side and add only a small portion of the almonds, peanuts or walnuts.

Avoid dishes like Sweet and Sour Pork, Pork Ribs, Kung Pao Chicken, Moo Shu Pork, fried or coated shrimp items and dishes heavy with gravies or sauces. Order dishes with lean meats (preferably white meat chicken) or fish (not fried) make sure there are lots of vegetables in the dish and ask them to cook it or sauté with “light oil.” Always ask for your sauces on the side!
If you are taking Mom out for Mexican food, skip all cheeses, sour cream and tortilla chips.

Order chicken, fish or shrimp fajitas, ask for “light oil” and order only corn tortillas. Limit yourself to one or two tortillas because most commercial varieties contain lard and saturated fat.

Avoid flour tortillas and the creamy sauces such as enchiladas, burritos or chimichangas. Skip the refried beans because they are usually high in fat. (Fat free refried beans are available in the grocery store so you can enjoy them at home.) Enjoy the salsa (no chips please!) and the fresh verde and salsa fresco sauces. These contain simple ingredients with low or no fat.

Treat Mom to fish with a light, fresh sauce – a great way to enjoy Mexican cuisine. Be careful of the rice because it might be loaded with lard, butter and salt. The best advice is to ask your waiter what’s in a dish before ordering it. A light beer is a better alcoholic beverage choice than a sugar-packed, salt-rimmed margarita. Have beer or wine to avoid the high calories and high fructose corn syrup in the party drinks.

If Mom is craving Indian food there are many ways to eat healthy. When dining out order chicken or shrimp tandoori to avoid fatty marinades and sauces. You can also order dishes with half the sauce or simply ask for the sauce on the side. Avoid the ghee-drenched breads such as paratha or chapati and order your naan without the ghee.

Raita makes a great dip with yoghurt and spices for your meal, and the rice dishes, if you ask for light oil or reduced ghee, ought to be okay. Order vegetable-heavy dishes and avoid the deep fried appetizers such as onion bhaji, papadums, pakoros and samosas. Dal is a good side dish and sauce because it is lentil-based and made with tomatoes, onions and spices. Curries can be made with ghee and coconut milk, ask about the sauce ingredients before ordering. You can request the kitchen to cook your dish with half the sauce or ask for the sauce on the side. Skip the deep fried desserts and stick with fruit.

If Mom loves Italian food, the Mediterranean Diet provides foods that are heart healthy. Avoid the creamy, cheesey sauces like Alfredo and stick with the sauces made with fresh tomatoes and vegetables. Make sure to skip the fried, stuffed or “parmesaned” selections and stay away from the four-cheese ravioli and baked ziti. Your best bet is to order grilled chicken breast, baked fish or a pasta dish with marinara (no meat) sauce or go for the linguini and clams.
In general stay away from the steak houses and meat-oriented grills. Choose a restaurant that offers fish and chicken dishes or go vegetarian for a change.

Red wine or light beer is a good choice if you are celebrating with an alcoholic beverage. Otherwise stick with club soda.

fruitswhiteDesserts can be a downfall if you’re not careful. Choose fresh berries and skip the cream or topping. If you want a taste, have a fork full of someone else’s desert. Avoid ordering your own unless it’s fresh fruit, berries or low fat heart healthy. It may be tough to pass up the desserts, but you can usually enjoy sharing a nice sorbet even though it contains sugar.

The words on menus you should definitely avoid are: fried, deep fried, sautéed, basted, breaded, coated, floured, fricassee, gratin, dusted, dredged, bisque, marinated * pan fried, wok fried, au jus, creamed, creamy, cream, cheesy, smothered**, mousse, chowder, buttered, encrusted, pastry. Commit those to memory and you’ll be on your way to eating heart-healthy.
* Marinated could mean high in oil, fat or sodium.
** Could mean smothered in anything. Be careful of what the item is smothered in!

Heart Disease is 90% preventable according to the American Heart Association. What a wonderful way to tell Mom you care. Get more information about your heart health at: www.HeartEasy.com

Have A Heart Healthy Mother’s Day – Part 1

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

recipeskacyoungFor fun, I Googled “Mother’s Day Menus” and discovered that most of the recipes were highly unsupported of heart health. One of the nicest things we can do to honor our mothers, and be honored if we are a mother, is to cook a heart healthy meal to show how much we value “Mom.”

Say “I love you,” with a meal that promotes heart health and tells her you want her to be around for a long, long time.

Part one of this article is filled with ideas for cooking for mom. Part Two contains suggestions for ordering heart healthy in a restaurant or at a brunch buffet. They can help you stay healthy.

Part One: Cooking with Love for Mom:

If you are making dinner or a brunch for Mom then please choose a meal that features a low fat main dish and sides that will keep her heart healthy.

Suggested menu: Heart Easy ™Roasted Citrus Chicken; Heart Easy™ Roasted Garlic, Grilled Avocado Mashed Potatoes; Heart Easy™ Fast & Easy Corn Pudding with Veggies. You’ll be too full for dessert, but if you insist, stick to fresh berries without the whipped cream.

Heart Easy ™Roasted Citrus Chicken

This entree roasts up beautifully moist and tenderly infused with four citrus flavors and garlic.

Ingredients:

1, 5 lb whole, low sodium, hormone free, chicken.
1 lemon, cut into 8 pieces
1 lime, cut into 8 pieces
1 orange cut into 8 pieces
6 cloves of garlic, crushed
Tangerine infused olive oil*
Fresh ground black pepper

Directions:

Wash chicken and remove giblets. Pat dry.

Using a chopstick or a small spatula gently lift and separate the chicken skin from the raw breast meat.

Carefully spread 1/2 of the crushed garlic under the skin and then repeat for the other chicken breast.
Press the garlic evenly under the skin.

Mix the lemon, lime and orange pieces together and push them into the chicken cavity. Close the cavity and secure with a small skewer or a couple of toothpicks.

Rub the exterior of the chicken with 1 T of the tangerine olive oil.

Place in a roasting pan. Cover the chicken breast, wing tips and drumstick tips with foil. Bake at 375˚ for 90 minutes or until chicken reaches 165˚. Remove foil coverings after 1 hour and allow chicken to continue cooking for another 1/2 hour. Remove from heat and allow chicken to rest for 10 minutes. Carve and place on a platter for serving.

Pasolivo™ makes the Tangerine Olive Oil. https://www.pasolivo.com

You can also create your own version by grating the rind of a tangerine, adding 2 T of cold pressed virgin olive oil and let stand overnight. Drain the rind from the oil and use as directed.

Heart Easy™ Roasted Garlic, Grilled Avocado Mashed Potatoes
Inspired by David Larkworthy

This amazing side dish is fresh, festive and delicious. It adds flair to any meal and becomes a topic of conversation immediately. Dazzle your guests with this one.

Yields: 4 servings

Ingredients:

1/2 lime,
1 1/2 Tablespoons of Smart Balance Light or I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter Light
1 1/4 pounds Yukon or honey gold potatoes, scrubbed
1/2 cup non-fat milk
1 tablespoon olive or avocado oil
1/2 – 1 teaspoon white pepper
2 ripe avocados
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
Fresh cilantro or parsley

Directions:

Scrub potatoes and cut them into 2″ pieces. Place in a microwave-safe dish and microwave 7-10 minutes until potatoes are cooked through. Set aside to cool. When cooled, peel the potatoes and place them in a bowl.

Cut avocadoes in half, remove the seed. Brush the avocado face with avocado or olive oil and place face down on a grill pan. (Pan with raised grill ribs.) Place lime face down on grill pan. Cook the avocados on medium low heat for 3-5 minutes until heated through. Cook the lime half for 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. When the avocados are cooled enough to handle safely, scoop out the flesh and add to the potatoes.

Heat the milk and butter substitute in the microwave for: 30-1:00 until butter is melted and milk is warmed. Squeeze the lime over the potato and avocado mixture, add milk, butter substitute, pepper and salt. Whip with a hand mixer or food processor. When fully blended and fluffy, turn into a bowl and serve. Top with parsley or cilantro.

Heart Easy ™ Fast & Easy Corn Pudding With Veggies

This dish is a one bowl wonder. Fix it and give yourself and your family the treat of comfort food without paying a high health price.

Ingredients:

Non-fat butter spray
3 cups canned yellow corn, drained (or 16 oz. frozen and thawed roasted corn)
1 egg plus 2 egg whites, beaten well or 1/2 cup Reddi Egg
1 cup chopped broccoli florets
1/2 cup chopped onion
2/3 cup seeded and chopped multi-colored peppers
2 Tbs. raw sugar
1/2 cup non-fat milk
1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
2 packages of powdered butter substitute – Butter Buds
1/4 cup SoySation® 3 Cheese Blend, or The Original Almond® Mozzarella Shreds, half reserved
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/8 tsp. Kosher salt
For a little southwest flavor add one 6 oz. can green chilies.

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Spray an oven-proof casserole dish with non-fat butter spray. Beat the egg whites or Reddi Egg until fluffy (about 1 minute). Mix the rest of the ingredients together in a medium bowl and pour into prepared casserole dish.

Bake for 30 to 40 minutes or until casserole is firm. Top with the remainder of SoySation® 3 blend cheese or your choice of Lisanatti RiceCheeze® flavors or The Original Almond® Shreds. Allow cheese to melt for 1 minute before serving. Cut and enjoy.

kacbookBest Tip: You can order Heart Easy, The Food Lover’s Guide to Heart Healthy Eating online at: www.HeartEasy.com and give Mom the gift of heart health. Over 300 delicious recipes to help her stay young, healthy and fit.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article…..

Heart Disease is 90% preventable according to the American Heart Association. What a wonderful way to tell Mom you care. Get more information about your heart health at: www.HeartEasy.com

Most Mothers Give Infants Solid Food Too Early

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babyFrom Your Health Journal…..”My regular visitors here know I always love to promote a site called My Health News Daily – as they always have such wonderful, informative health articles. Today’s article is written by Rachael Rettner entitled Most Mothers Give Infants Solid Food Too Early. New findings each day help us to understand the beginnings of childhood obesity. We know an epidemic is taking place now, not just with children, but adults. And, obesity related illness is also on the rise, which include heart disease, asthma, cancer, weak joints, and type 2 diabetes. Sedentary lifestyle, along with lack of physical activity is a major culprit to the developing problem. Now, in a study, 40 percent of mothers said they gave their infants solid foods before the age of 4 months, which is earlier than recommended. About 24 percent of mothers who breast-fed, and 53 percent of mothers who formula-fed, gave their babies solid food too early. Studies have also linked the early introduction of solid foods with an increased risk of chronic diseases later in life, such as obesity and eczema. In addition, starting babies on solid foods early may reduce the duration of breastfeeding, and breastfeeding itself has been shown to have many health benefits for kids. I encourage you all to visit the My Health News Daily web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. I thought it was well written and informative.”

From the article…..

In the study, 40 percent of mothers said they gave their infants solid foods before the age of 4 months, which is earlier than recommended. About 24 percent of mothers who breast-fed, and 53 percent of mothers who formula-fed, gave their babies solid food too early.

At the time the study was conducted (between 2005 and 2007), the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended infants start solid foods no earlier than 4 months. Currently, the AAP recommends waiting until 6 months. Until that time, the AAP recommends breast milk as the sole food for infants (along with necessarily vitamin supplements).

The new findings are concerning because infants may not be developmentally ready for solid foods before 4 months of age (they may have troubling eating and swallow the food properly), the researchers said. Studies have also linked the early introduction of solid foods with an increased risk of chronic diseases later in life, such as obesity and eczema. In addition, starting babies on solid foods early may reduce the duration of breastfeeding, and breastfeeding itself has been shown to have many health benefits for kids.

The findings highlight the need for better communication about when mothers should start their infants on solid foods, and the risks of giving these foods too early, said study researcher Kelley Scanlon, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity.

The study surveyed 1,334 women before they gave birth, and nearly every month during the first year of the baby’s life. Moms were asked to report any solid foods their babies ate in the last week.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Overweight Mothers ‘Give Birth To Babies With Clogged Arteries’

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pregnantFrom Your Health Journal…..A very good article from The Australian via The Times written by Chris Smyth entitled Overweight Mothers ‘Give Birth To Babies With Clogged Arteries’ – a well written and informative article I wanted to promote. We have discussed here recently about the obesity epidemic facing adults and children all over the world. We have posted articles from at least a dozen countries pointing to problems in their homeland about obesity. Obesity related illness is also on the rise – as many people are showing risk factors for cancer, heart disease, weak joints, type 2 diabetes, asthma, as well as low self-esteem. Sedentary lifestyles, increased usage of technology, poor diets, and lack of physical activity are all to blame. Now, new research suggests that the babies of overweight mothers are born with the first signs of heart disease. Scientist have discovered that the walls of the body’s main artery are already thickened in newborns whose mothers are obese or overweight, and the fatter the women the more their babies’ arteries appeared to be clogged. These are very important findings, and I suggest you read the full story (link provided below) to learn more.”

From the article…..

The babies of overweight mothers are born with the first signs of heart disease, Australian research suggests.

The walls of the body’s main artery are already thickened in newborns whose mothers are obese or overweight, and the fatter the women the more their babies’ arteries appeared to be clogged, scientists have found.

Experts cautioned that the study was too small to be certain, but suggested that overweight mothers were increasing their children’s risk of heart disease in later life.

Most women giving birth are now overweight or obese, and campaigners said the latest findings added urgency to efforts to reduce the weight of new mothers.

Australian scientists looked at 23 women whose body mass index ranged from normal to morbidly obese early in pregnancy, and when their babies were seven days old scanned the newborns’ abdominal aortas, the section of the artery running down to the belly.

The thickness of the innermost walls of the artery ranged from 0.65mm to 0.97mm and increased with the mother’s weight, irrespective of the size of the baby itself. There was a difference of 0.06mm between babies of overweight and normal weight mothers.

Michael Skilton and his team from the University of Sydney said that this hinted that arteries were already clogged up at birth.

“The earliest physical signs of atherosclerosis [clogging of the arteries] are present in the abdominal aorta, and aortic intima-media thickness is considered the best non-invasive measure of structural health of the vasculature in children; suggesting a putative mechanism by which maternal adiposity [fatness] may influence the risk of later cardiovascular disease in the offspring,” Dr Skilton and his team write in the journal Fetal and Neonatal Edition of Archives of Disease of Childhood.

Tam Fry of the National Obesity Forum said that the findings were worrying.

“Babies are starting to have a pretty rough existence before they’re born because of the weight of their mothers,” he said.

“The lesson we should get from this is we’ve got to be really much more focused on making sure women of child-bearing age from the earliest point, back in school, get the message that if they think of having babies they have to think of the responsibility to get themselves healthy before conceiving. There has got to be a lot of pressure on women to go into pregnancy at the right weight. There’s still this myth about eating for two, that you have to eat more.

To read the complete article…..Click here