Sports America Kids Month

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boyssportsIn conjunction with June’s “Sports America Kids Month,” the Austin sports medicine team at Medicine in Motion presents compelling reasons for parents to encourage children to participate in summertime sports activities.

Held every year during the month of June, Sports America Kids Month encourages children to engage in a healthy lifestyle, including sports activities, during the summer months. To help encourage kids to become active, Austin sports medicine doctor and owner of Medicine in Motion Dr. Martha Pyron has established a free Saturday morning summer training camp for all ages and all athletic abilities.

“Physical activity is one component that is crucial to a healthy and happy body,” said Dr. Pyron. “Children should be encouraged to find a sport or physical activity that interests them. Not only will it make for healthier bodies, but the emotional and mental benefits are enormous too. Everyone who plays a sport can be a physical fitness winner!”

Playing one or more sports can help kids develop confidence, self-discipline, coordination, teamwork skills, and sportsmanship behavior. Perhaps most importantly, however, are the health and wellness benefits that come from the physical activity involved with playing sports. Recent data from organizations such as the National Association for Sport and Physical Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services show the need for a stronger focus on health and wellness among American youth:

* One in three children are physically active on a daily basis.

* Over 80% of children do not participate in enough aerobic physical activity to meet standard youth guidelines.

* Children spend upwards of seven and a half hours a day watching TV, playing video games or on a computer.

* Reports from 2009-2010 shows approximately 12.5 million (16.9%) children are obese.

* Overweight children have a 70% chance of becoming overweight or obese adults.

Childhood obesity is a serious issue with both short-term and long-term effects on health and wellness. Obese youth are more likely to have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, which can lead to cardiovascular disease. Children who are obese are more likely to suffer from bone and joint problems, sleep apnea, and psychological issues like poor self-esteem. Obese youth are likely to be obese as adult, which will put them at risk for adult health complications like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, various types of cancer, and osteoarthritis.

For more information on Medicine in Motion’s Saturday training camps, contact them at 512-257-2500 or officemanager(at)medinmotion(dot)com.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

Global Employee Health & Fitness Month

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seniorexerciseIn conjunction with May’s “Global Employee Health & Fitness Month,” the Austin sports medicine team at Medicine in Motion presents compelling reasons for establishing health and wellness programs at the workplace.

Held every year during the month of May, Global Employee Health & Fitness Month promotes “the benefits of a healthy lifestyle to employers and their employees through worksite health promotion activities and environments.” Given that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have projected that the United States’ National Healthcare Expenditure will continue to rise and reach $5 trillion by 2022, worksite wellness has never been more important. According to the “Guide to Workplace Wellness” by Health Advocate™, some of the workplace costs related to having unhealthy employees include:

* Obesity-related conditions cost more than $13 billion each year in medical expenses and lost productivity.

* A typical smoker costs about $3,900 each year in medical expenses and lost productivity.

* Stress costs approximately $300 billion each year in medical expenses, lost productivity, missed work days, accidents and employee turnover.

* Diabetes costs 14 million disability days each year.

* Cardiovascular disease cost $142 billion in lost productivity in 2001.

As health care costs continue to rise for workplaces, many organizations are seeking ways to improve the health and wellness of their employees. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, increasing physical activity can:

* lower the risk of heart disease,

* lower the risk of stroke,

* lower the risk of high blood pressure,

* lower the risk of colon and breast cancers,

* help prevent weight gain,

* improve cardiovascular and muscular fitness strength,

* prevent falls,

* improve bone strength, and

* reduce symptoms of depression.

Programs that focus on education of and engagement with employees on topics such as nutrition, stress management, physical fitness, and smoking can facilitate a healthier worksite. A healthier workforce, in turn, can lead to higher productivity, fewer missed days, decreased health care costs, higher morale, and stronger retention rates – all of which will improve an organization’s bottom-line.

The 2010 “Workplace Wellness Programs Can Generate Savings” report revealed that for every dollar spent on wellness initiatives, medical expenses dropped by about $3.27, while the costs associated with missed days by employees decreased by about $2.73. This and other similar return-on-investment studies continue to collect evidence that offering workplace wellness programs makes an enormous impact on employee health and organizational savings.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

Youth Sports Safety Month

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boyssportsIn conjunction with “Youth Sports Safety Month,” the Austin sports medicine team at Medicine in Motion has compiled five recommendations for teenagers who are interested in launching a fitness routine.

The average teenager’s schedule is filled by juggling school, work, post-high school plans, family life, dating, friends and studying. It doesn’t leave much time for physical fitness, but since one out of three kids in the United States is considered overweight or obese, health and wellness of teens is a topic that can’t be ignored. Not only will participating in fitness activities help teens maintain a healthy weight, it also combats stress and depression, boosts energy levels and builds confidence.

But getting teens on board the fitness train is only the first step – injury prevention education and preparation are also critical. According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, more than 7.3 million high school students annually partake in physical fitness by participating in organized sports. And since, according to the Centers for Disease Control, high school athletics account for more than 2 million injuries annually, preventing traumatic injuries should be top of mind for all parents and active teens.

During April’s “Youth Sports Safety Month,” the Austin sports medicine team at Medicine in Motion has identified five essential habits that should be adopted by teenagers who are beginning to pursue a physically fit lifestyle:

1. Start small. All worthy accomplishments take time to achieve, and so does physical fitness. When teenagers begin, they shouldn’t expect massive results to happen overnight. Steady marked improvements are normal, however, when teens set reasonable goals and stick to their workout schedules. Setting smaller goals will allow participants to regularly meet and celebrate their achievements, reducing the likelihood of discouragement when larger goals aren’t rapidly attained.

2. Eat healthy. A lot of people, young and old, think that exercise is free pass to eat whatever they please. The most physically fit people know, however, that fitness is a whole body experience, including food consumption. People who start healthy eating habits in their teens are more likely to maintain those habits when they’re older, giving them a life-long fitness advantage. A few suggestions include: eat a daily healthy breakfast, cut down on processed foods, enjoy an endless amount of raw vegetables, consume lean proteins, and eat smaller meals five to six times per day.

3. Hydrate properly. The human body is, on average, made up of over 50% water. It’s an essential ingredient under normal circumstances, but when exercise and increased perspiration is involved, hydrating is even more crucial. Not only should a person drink water throughout their regular day, they should also stay reasonably hydrated during their workout. Remember that when thirst occurs, a person is already dehydrated, so keep a glass or bottle of water handy at all times.

4. Don’t skip on sleep. Teen bodies are still in flux, growing and changing – this requires a lot of sleep. When adding exercise into the mix, the body needs even more rest so it can properly repair and rebuild muscles. Teenagers should strive for at least eight hours of quality sleep every night.

5. Partner up. It’s easy to get discouraged and overwhelmed when tackling a new challenge like physical fitness, so find a friend, classmate or family member to join in the activity. Not only does the buddy system make the routines more enjoyable, partners have the advantage of being able to assist one another during difficult exercises and help each other maintain proper form to avoid injury.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

National Nutrition Month® Tips

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healthillustrated“Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle” during March’s National Nutrition Month® by working toward consuming fewer calories, making informed food decisions, and participating in a daily exercise routine.

March is National Nutrition Month®, an annual nutrition education and information campaign sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The 2015 theme is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” which promotes the consumption of fewer calories, informed food decisions, and daily exercise for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, reducing risks of chronic diseases and promoting overall wellness.

Whether a person is new to physical fitness activities or a pro, nutrition can seem complicated. Many nutritionists create intense and detailed food regimens for their clients, but a solid nutrition program can be simple and still very beneficial. For those wanting the most from a diet and fitness routine, the following tips may help:

1.Daily balanced diet. For consistent performance at the gym or with a sport, the body needs a regular supply of quality energy for the muscles. A few daily essentials for meeting the body’s needs include: a balanced breakfast; carbohydrates for fuel; and proteins and fats appropriate for a person’s individual body-type and fitness goals.

2.Day of the workout. For those tackling a workout first thing in the morning, be sure to have a light breakfast like fruit, toast, and/or an egg. For those who workout in the evenings, have a lunch that easily digestible but includes complex carbs. Pasta, fruits, vegetables or a salad with lean meat (chicken or fish) are good examples.

3. Immediately prior to workout. About 30 minutes before an intense workout, eat a light to moderate snack and drink some water. The amount of food a person should ingest depends on the length and intensity of their upcoming workout. Longer, harder activities may require the individual to eat an energy bar or large banana.

4.During workout. Necessary hydration varies from person to person, but a good rule of thumb is to intake 8 to 10 fl oz of water every 15 minutes while exercising. For those working out longer than 90 minutes, carbohydrates will likely need to be replenished as well, making a sports drink more of an ideal choice.

5.Post-workout hydration. After a workout, water needs to be replaced in the body according to how much a person has sweated. The more perspiration, the more hydration required. To be absolutely precise, check body weight before and after the physical activity. For every pound decrease, a person should drink about 3 cups of water.

6.Post-workout food. Glycogen stores should be replenished within two hours after an intense workout. Research shows that a 4-to-1 ratio of carbs to proteins is the ideal post-workout nutrition combination. The nourishment can come in the form of solid food, a liquid shake, or a combination of the two.

Medicine in Motion (MIM) specializes in providing top quality sports medicine in Austin, Texas, for athletic individuals of all ages and levels. The staff at MIM believes active bodies are healthy bodies, therefore it is the office’s goal to keep patients energetic and fit. To that end, MIM provides treatment of injuries and illnesses, including the use of physical rehabilitation; promotes healthy living with personal training and nutrition coaching; and offers comprehensive sports medicine evaluations to optimize health, activity level and sports performance. For more information or for questions regarding sports medicine in Austin, contact Medicine in Motion at 512-257-2500 or visit the website at http://www.medinmotion.com.

March Is Kidney Cancer Awareness Month

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newsMarch is Kidney Cancer Awareness Month and the Kidney Cancer Association (KCA) and its nearly 91,000 members in more than 100 countries will celebrate by honoring the many collaborators who have helped to make it the largest organization of its kind.

Since its founding in 1990 by the late Eugene P. Schonfeld, Ph.D., KCA has developed scores of highly effective relationships with organizations and institutions around the world.

Carrie Konosky, KCA Vice President for Development, says, “By working with others who specialize in helping people whose lives have been touched by renal cancers, we’ve made remarkable strides in the investigation of new medicines, along with advancements in surgery, and helping patient families to manage the psychosocial aspects of dealing with cancer.”

Among the earliest collaborations were those that brought medical experts on board as advisors to KCA. Doctors and researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering, University of Chicago, Loyola University, Cleveland Clinic, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and other major academic centers were among the first to join this effort. Soon faculty from West Coast institutions joined, followed by doctors from the major European centers.

In the 1990s, KCA joined the Washington, DC, based Cancer Leadership Council, where others with a shared interest in the eradication of death and suffering from cancer gather monthly to work on a common advocacy agenda.

Members of KCA have served on the governing board of Friends of Cancer Research and as advisors to the director of the National Cancer Institute through the Director’s Consumer Liaison Group.

KCA’s longstanding affiliation with Patient Advocate Foundation enables families to receive prompt assistance with questions related to health insurance, as well as co-payment assistance for drugs.

Nurses working in the biotherapy unit at Providence Portland Medical Center answer patients’ questions related to side-effects from drug treatments and also provide referrals to expert physicians.

“Obviously, there are too many KCA collaborations for us to list, ” Konosky says. “These relationships will be evident to anyone who visits our website. Recently, we began working with Lotsa Helping Hands, a group that facilitates online connections for families that need help dealing with routine tasks because of a loved one’s experience with kidney cancer.”

KCA also collaborates with two groups that help patients to raise funds for medical expenses. Details are available on the charity’s website, where information about one-to-one patient support through Imerman Angels may also be found.

Konosky adds, “We’re grateful to Hollywood star Denise Richards, one of our directors, for helping to bring much needed awareness to kidney cancer, the disease that took her mother’s life in 2007. Denise has been wonderfully supportive in helping us to raise funds, so that KCA’s work can continue.”

KCA CEO, Bill Bro, a 26-year kidney cancer survivor, serves as a member of National Cancer Institute’s Renal Cancer Task Force, as well as being an active participant in endeavors aimed at improving patient care.

February Is National Children’s Dental Health Month

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brushteethFebruary is National Children’s Dental Health Month. According to Smiles Park Avenue Dental, roughly 41 percent of children age 2-11 have had decay in their primary teeth.

If there’s one thing that all dentists have in common, it’s that they regularly see young patients with tooth decay. According to a report by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (published Aug. 26, 2005), roughly 41 percent of children age 2-11 have had decay in their primary teeth, while approximately 32 percent of children ages 9-11 have decay in their permanent teeth.¹

Sharde Harvey, D.D.S and principal at New York-based Smiles Park Avenue Dental, a practice that specializes in cosmetic and restorative dentistry, notes that there are many foods that can help or harm a child’s teeth. Here are the good and the bad:

THE GOOD: Here are some foods, even “junk foods,” that can help a child’s oral health:

* Dark Chocolate. The super dark treat can actually brighten a child’s teeth. Tannins (antioxidants found in cacao) prevent bacteria from sticking to teeth while also neutralizing the microorganisms that cause bad breath

* Unsweetened hulless popcorn. This treat acts as a natural tooth detergent in addition to being highly nutritious and loaded with vitamins and minerals. Its calcium phosphorus supplies valuable minerals and roughage and helps to exercise the teeth.

* Chew gum with xylitol. It helps reduce bacteria which lead to tooth decay. A few pieces of a gum such as Dentyne Ice leave no plaque-causing sticky residue, changes the chemistry in a child’s mouth and can actually help keep cavities away.

* Cinnamon flavored gum. Cinnamon helps to reduce bacteria in a child’s mouth. So gum like Orbit Cinnamon flavor may very well help inhibit growth of cavity causing bacteria.

* Sugar-free lollipops and hard candies. These treats stimulate saliva, which prevents dry mouth. A dry mouth allows plaque to build up on teeth faster, leading to an increased risk of cavities.

* Sip sugary drinks through a straw. This helps children to limit the amount of contact the sugar has with the teeth.

* Yogurt snacks. Foods that provide calcium and phosphates, such as yogurt snacks and milk and cheese can strengthen the tooth’s surface.

* Juice boxes. Add water to the juice drinks to dilute the sugar.

* String cheese. Some foods neutralize acids which cause cavities such as pears, apples and dairy, especially cheese.

* Raw nuts. These provide calcium and phosphates that can strengthen the tooth’s surface.

THE BAD: Here are some food-based causes of tooth decay in children:

* Drinking from a bottle. When children drink from a bottle, the liquid sloshes around their teeth and gums, and any drink with sugar in it will increase the chance of decay. So only put milk and water in a bottle. At bedtime, it’s especially important to put only water in the bottle. That’s because prolonged exposure to the sugars in milk can cause cavities too.

* Sippy cups. Limit the amount of time that a child has a sippy cup in her mouth, especially if it is filled with juices which are high in sugars and acids. Try diluting the juice or substituting water instead.

* Gummy vitamins. Many children consume their sweet or gummy vitamins after they brush their teeth, so the sugar remains on their teeth all morning.

* Sour candies. High acid levels in these treats can break down tooth enamel quickly.

* Sticky candies. Candies like gummies and dried fruits linger on the teeth, giving the bacteria extra time to cause damage.

* Long-lasting sugars. Lollipops and cough drops allow the sugar to remain in the mouth for a prolonged period.

* Starchy foods. Foods like French fries, white bread and pretzels easily lodge between teeth and are quickly converted to sugar by the pre-digestive saliva.

* Powdery candy. Candies which dissolve quickly and contain nothing but sugar, can lead to cavities by changing the mouth pH and giving the bacteria pure sugar to feed on.

* Acidic foods and drinks. Such as soda and fruit juices eat away the healthy enamel of teeth.

The foods that damage teeth have been shown to damage overall health, and the foods that are favorable to teeth tend to be favorable to health. No surprise. This is just one more reminder of why it is important to teach children early on the importance of eating well and avoiding sugars.

For additional information please go to http://www.SmilesParkAvenueDental.com

Reference:

1) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Aug. 26, 2005, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5403a1.htm

February Is American Heart Health Awareness Month

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healthyheartbpThe CDC has teamed up with Million Hearts for American Heart Health Awareness and NJ Top Docs wants you to do the same.

The CDC has teamed up with Million Hearts® in order to prevent one million strokes and heart attacks in the U.S. by the year 2017. Each New Year, people all over the world set personal goals to accomplish by the end of the year. Whether it’s losing those five pesky pounds, quitting smoking, or visiting relatives more often, there should definitely be this one goal on everyone’s list: staying on top of their heart health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages people each February (and all year round), to pay attention to their blood pressure. NJ Top Docs wants its readers to join the CDC and Million Hearts® in this national campaign.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. More than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure, making it four times more likely for them to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease. Most times, there are no signs or symptoms of high blood pressure. It is imperative that people check their blood pressure regularly.

The CDC offers the following suggestions to maintaining good heart health:

“Ask your doctor what your blood pressure should be. Set a goal to lower your pressure with your doctor and talk about how you can reach your goal. Work with your health care team to make sure you meet that goal. Track your blood pressure over time. One way to do that is with this free wallet card[920 KB] from Million Hearts®.

Take your blood pressure medicine as directed. Set a timer on your phone to remember to take your medicine at the same time each day. If you are having trouble taking your medicines on time or paying for your medicines, or if you are having side effects, ask your doctor for help.

Quit smoking—and if you don’t smoke, don’t start. You can find tips and resources at CDC’s Smoking and Tobacco website.

Reduce sodium intake. Most Americans consume too much sodium, which can raise blood pressure. Read about ways to reduce your sodium and visit the Million Hearts® Healthy Eating & Lifestyle Resource Center for heart-healthy, lower-sodium recipes, meal plans, and helpful articles.”

More information about high blood pressure is available at CDC’s High Blood Pressure website. In addition, the following resources are available to help you and your loved ones make control your goal:

High Blood Pressure: How to Make Control Your Goal

Supporting Your Loved One with High Blood Pressure

African Americans Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet

Sources:
http://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/

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“Be Heart Smart” Campaign During National Heart Month

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heartshinyFebruary is American Heart Month, and Northern California Medical Associates (NCMA) Cardiology is kicking off its “Be Heart Smart” campaign to do its part to spread heart health awareness. Since 1975, NCMA Cardiology has focused on educational outreach in addition to providing a comprehensive range of cardiac services from highly trained, elite physicians.

Heart disease has been the number-one killer of Americans for the past 80 years. In 2015, it isn’t news to most people that heart disease is the leading cause of premature death in the United States. It also isn’t news to most people that heart disease is preventable. The shocking news is that even though people know the risks of heart disease and that it is preventable, the incidence of heart disease and related deaths continues to grow. According to the American Heart Association, one in seven deaths is related to coronary heart disease, and one in nine is caused by heart failure. In light of the growing problem, February has been deemed “Heart Month” in America. NCMA Cardiology has launched its “Be Heart Smart” social media campaign this month as a means to help people realize the power of preventative healthy living to reverse the trend of rising heart disease.

While there are some risk factors that can’t be controled such as age, gender, heredity, and race, people can significantly mitigate their risk for heart disease by making healthy lifestyle choices. With its campaign, NCMA Cardiology hopes to reach as many people as possible and to cause them to stop and think about their hearts when making health-related choices. NCMA cardiologists have identified seven interrelated goals that will help people reduce their risk for heart disease. In essence, the “Be Heart Smart” campaign is about (1) managing diet and weight, (2) exercising regularly, (3) quitting smoking, (4) reducing stress, (5) keeping blood pressure in the healthy range, (6) managing cholesterol levels, and (7) controlling blood sugar.

First and foremost, managing diet and weight is the most important step towards minimizing one’s risk of heart disease. NCMA Cardiology strives to redefine the meaning of ‘diet’ in popular culture. One’s diet encompasses everything he or she ingests over a lifetime. Alternatively, when one ‘goes on a diet,’ this most likely means the dieter is resisting the foods that he or she prefers to eat for a set period of time for the sake of losing weight. This type of dieting is not an effective way to sustain weight loss, as once the diet ends, the person rewards themselves with the unhealthy foods they resisted while dieting. To truly have a healthy diet, NCMA cardiologists recommend eating smaller portions at meals, and snacking on vegetables and fiber-rich whole grains during the day.

While obesity poses one of the most serious threats to heart health, it isn’t the only factor for increased risk of heart disease due to a poor diet. Everyone’s body processes food differently. Although it is unlikely, some people can appear slim and fit while sustaining themselves on potato chips and soda pop. This does not change the fact that these people are increasing their risk for heart disease through their diets. What foods are really the best for your heart? Recent studies have shown that the “Mediterranean diet” can reduce the risk heart disease by about 20% in both men and women.

“Just taking a walk in the morning or the evening will put you on your way to better heart health.”

After maintaining a healthy diet, exercising regularly is the next most important step towards reducing hearth health. Not only will living a sedentary lifestyle reduce muscle strength and endurance, it will also contribute to metabolic problems such as high blood sugar and cholesterol. Much scientific research has gone into how much exercise is enough, and today’s leading experts recommend getting at least 60 minutes of continuous, moderate aerobic exercise each day of the week. NCMA cardiologists recognize that this recommendation is more than what many Americans are willing to do or have time for, so they level with patients and tell them the raw facts—true up until the extreme, the more cardiovascular exercise people get everyday, the more they reduce their risk for heart disease. While 60 minutes a day brings about excellent health benefits, even just 20 to 30 minutes of continuous, moderate aerobic exercise five days a week has been shown to reduce the risk for heart disease by 30-50%. Just taking a walk in the morning or the evening will put you on your way to better heart health.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that smoking dramatically increases your risk of cardiovascular heart disease. Like it says on every cigarette box today, smoking causes heart disease. Smoking accelerates the progression of heart disease in people predisposed to having it, and drastically increases the chances of it developing in people who would otherwise be at a very low risk. In conjunction with the Northern California Center of Well-Being, NCMA offers smoking cessation classes. Even if a smoker isn’t ready to quit, it is important to talk to a NCMA physician about smoking habits in order to gain access to all of the resources, clinics and classes offered through NCMA.

healthyheartWhen it comes to reducing stress, it is important to clarify what kind of stress is most necessary to reduce for the sake of improving heart health. Reducing physical stress such as exercise, for example, should not be thought of as an effective means to reduce one’s risk of heart disease. Emotional stress, such as work-related, relationship, and financial stresses, has long been suspected and recently confirmed to increase one’s risk for heart disease. These types of stresses, however unpleasant or dangerous, cannot always be avoided. Reducing stress, therefore, is ultimately about finding ways to relax when confronted with stressful situations. No two people will ever react to the same type of stress the same way, so it is also important for individuals to determine the stresses that affect them most.

High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and off-balance, volatile blood sugar levels are all relatively common in our society and can significantly increase one’s risk of developing heart disease. While the best way to mitigate these risks is through exercise, healthy eating, and not smoking cigarettes, treatment may require management with drug therapy and careful monitoring by a physician. Other contributing factors other than lifestyle choices such as genetics and metabolic disorders are often unavoidable and may warrant even closer care by a doctor.

Improving heart health and reducing the risk for heart disease doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Simply making an effort to be conscious of heart health in day-to-day living can go a long way. To start, NCMA Cardiology encourages everyone to pick two or three goals on the “Be Heart Smart” list to go after. In addition, keeping regular appointments with a cardiologist before any serious heart issues arise is the best way to stay on top of heart health.

NCMA Cardiology is comprised of 14 cardiologists, two cardiothoracic and vascular surgeons, and one electrophysiologist—all board-certified in their fields. Since 1975, the group has focused on sub specialization within cardiovascular health to provide services by the most highly trained and experienced physicians and staff. In accordance with its practice of providing comprehensive cardiovascular health care, NCMA offers HeartWorks, pacemaker and defibrillator clinics, anti-coagulation clinics, congestive heart failure clinics, pulmonary hypertension clinics, lipid clinics, and an adult congenital heart clinic in addition to general check-ups with cardiologists. NCMA’s HeartWorks Cardiac Rehabilitation Center provides each patient with a personal diet and exercise plan supervised by a team of physicians, nurses, and cardiac exercise specialists.

NCMA Cardiology provides cardiac care in three counties, with 11 offices, located in Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Sonoma, Healdsburg, Fort Bragg, Mendocino, Gualala, Ukiah, and Lakeport. Visit our website at http://www.ncmahealth.com for more information on NCMA health services and contacting NCMA offices. Please call (707) 573-6166 to schedule an appointment with NCMA Cardiology, and visit NCMA’s Facebook page to follow the “Be Heart Smart” campaign.

La Peer Health Systems Supports Lung Cancer Awareness Month

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newsDr. Ali Mahtabifard, MD, of La Peer Health Systems in Beverly Hills discusses the importance of Lung Cancer Awareness Month.

The nation recognizes lung cancer this November during Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a time to learn about the disease and participate in its prevention. La Peer Health Systems’ physicians, including thoracic surgeon Dr. Ali Mahtabifard, believe that creating awareness helps motivate the community to fight against the disease.

“There are numerous factors that cause lung cancer,” said Ali Mahtabifard, MD, Medical Director of the Thoracic Surgery Center of Excellence, a division of La Peer Health Systems. “Dedicating November to helping people understand those causes, is a positive step towards stopping the disease.”

During November, The American Lung Association seeks to educate people about the diverse factors that cause lung cancer and the ways to minimize one’s risk of developing the disease. While lung cancer is often the result of long-term and second-hand tobacco exposure, the disease is also caused by numerous other factors, including lifestyle choices, genetic issues, and environmental issues.

“We are dedicated to helping people minimize their risk of developing lung cancer,” added Dr. Mahtabifard, “and we take every opportunity we can to teach others about prevention. Lung Cancer Awareness Month gives us an opportunity to bring up the subject with patients, family, and friends. We also encourage the community to be proactive in protecting their lung health.”

Lung Cancer Awareness is one of the many such programs supported by La Peer Health Systems. The medical center’s physicians have also participated in Breast Cancer Awareness and Prostate Cancer Awareness in September. All La Peer physicians are advocates of early detection, and they consider awareness months occasions to initiate conversations about prevention with family and friends.

Dr. Mahtabifard is medical director of La Peer Health Systems’ Thoracic Surgery Center of Excellence, which is an outpatient facility specializing in minimally invasive and non-surgical procedures for excessive sweating. Joined by his colleague Dr. Clark B. Fuller, the doctors are a medical team specializing in some of the most technologically advanced surgical and reconstructive procedures performed in a comfortable and controlled outpatient environment.

La Peer Health Systems is an outpatient surgery center in Beverly Hill offering excellent patient care combined with the most medically advanced treatments possible. La Peer was founded by doctors and consists of 50 world-renowned physicians focused in 14 specialties providing comprehensive medical treatment. Patients are taken from consultation to diagnosis, treatment, and surgery followed up by aftercare. Medical specialties include orthopedics & sports medicine, plastics & reconstructive surgery, gynecology, spine surgery, interventional cardiology, bariatric surgery, thoracic surgery,gastroenterology, head & neck surgery, colorectal & general surgery, podiatry, ophthalmology, pain management, and anesthesiology. La Peer is an outpatient alternative to a large hospital offering extremely personal care in a controlled, safe, and comfortable environment.

To learn more about La Peer Health Systems, visit http://www.lapeerhealth.com.

La Peer Health Systems Recognizes National Physical Therapy Month

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newsExperts at the Joint Surgery Center of Excellence in Beverly Hills honor physical therapists during Physical Therapy Awareness Month.

Physical therapists are being honored this October during National Physical Therapy Month. The purpose of this event is to recognize the important role these professionals play in helping patients recover from joint surgery.

“Physical therapy perform a critical role in helping our patients regain their physical health and mobility,” said Dr. Joseph Isaacson, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at the Joint Surgery Center of Excellence, a division of La Peer Health Systems. “The right program is essential to restoring range of motion and strength after joint surgery.”

Dr. Isaacson specializes in treating patients with congenital abnormalities and small stature. He also specializes in joint reconstructive surgery in young adults.

“Many of the cases we work are the results of sports injuries,” added Dr. Jason Snibbe, the Medical Director of La Peer’s Joint Surgery Center of Excellence. “For athletes, physical therapy is an absolutely crucial part of rebuilding physical fitness and returning to the previous level of performance.”

Dr. Snibbe also treats patients for hip and knee conditions at La Peer’s Knee Surgery Center of Excellence. Earlier in his career, he was an assistant physician for many Los Angeles area sports teams including the Lakers, Dodgers, Angels, Kings, Mighty Ducks, LA Avengers, and Galaxy.

Throughout the year, La Peer Health Systems participates in a number of other awareness programs including Prostate Cancer Awareness in September and National Colorectal Cancer Awareness in March.

About La Peer

La Peer Health Systems is an outpatient surgery center in Beverly Hills, founded by doctors and focused on providing excellent patient care alongside the most cutting-edge medical treatments available. With 50 world-renowned physicians in 14 specialties, comprehensive medical treatment is offered that takes patients from consultation to diagnosis, treatment, surgery, and ultimately aftercare. The 14 medical departments include orthopedics & sports medicine, gastroenterology, head & neck surgery, colorectal & general surgery, podiatry, ophthalmology, pain management, plastics & reconstructive surgery, gynecology, spine surgery, interventional cardiology, bariatric surgery, thoracic surgery, and anesthesiology. Unlike large hospitals, La Peer’s unique structure offers extremely personal care in a safe and controlled environment.

To learn more about La Peer Health Systems, visit http://www.lapeerhealth.com.