American College Of Sports Medicine Installs New Officers

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Thank you to ACSM for supplying this article…..

womanweightsThe American College of Sports Medicine installed its officers for 2016-17 at the organization’s annual meeting in Boston, Mass. Lawrence A. Armstrong, Ph.D., FACSM, 2015-16 president, passed the gavel to Elizabeth A. Joy, MD, MPH, FACSM as the 59th president of ACSM. Dr. Joy is a physician practicing at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City.

In addition to serving as medical director for Community Health and Clinical Nutrition at Intermountain Healthcare, Dr. Joy practices family medicine and sports medicine at the Salt Lake LiVe Well Center, and is an adjunct professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. She has previously served as vice president, and on the Board of Trustees of ACSM, and was on the Board of Trustees for the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine. She is on the editorial board for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine and is an associate editor for Current Sports Medicine Reports.

Walter R. Thompson, Ph.D., FACSM, of Georgia State University was installed as president-elect. Holly Benjamin, M.D., FACSM, of University of Chicago and William Kraus, M.D., FACSM of Duke University’s School of Medicine were installed as vice presidents. A complete list of ACSM’s new officers and trustees can be viewed here.

The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 50,000 international, national and regional members and certified professionals are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine.

Alternative Medicine Today: Is It Time to Recognize This Overlooked Treatment Option?

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By Erin Talbot

doctorAlternative medicine used to be laughed out of the doctor’s office. But, anymore, even medical doctors are realizing the powerful effect of natural remedies. Here are a few reasons why people turn to them, and how they complement traditional medicine.

It Works

Who can argue with a treatment that works? If you have a toothache, and you use oregano oil on it, and you get better (assuming that nothing else about your diet or lifestyle changed), then it boils down to two things: natural spontaneous remission or the oil.

That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t buy dental insurance. It just means that natural remedies may be able to augment or complement traditional medicine, which could lower the cost of treatment for certain illnesses or conditions.

And, if they didn’t work, we wouldn’t have used them for thousands of years. Pharmaceutical companies wouldn’t be studying plants and extracting compounds from them to make their patented drugs. It’s true that some drugs are more powerful than their natural counterparts. But it’s also true that people used them with great efficacy before the drug companies patented them.

For example, red yeast rice contains the active ingredients in many statin drugs. Willow tree bark contains the active ingredient in aspirin. Ginger is another example. It has been shown to have anti-cancer properties, as well as anti-inflammatory properties. It helps to regulate blood sugar. Mullein can kill worms in the body, may kill TB and pneumonia, e.coli, and some other bacteria.

Lavender may promote relaxation and sleep. It can also be used as a mild pain reliever.

As more and more research comes out on this stuff, one thing is clear: there is evidence that it works.

They’re Safe

The majority of the herbs you can buy in the store are safe. They have few, if any, side effects. And, the side effects they do have are mild. They can be used by almost anyone, even pregnant and nursing women. A therapeutic dose is generally not considered dangerous, and they’re not addicting.

The safest herbs include ginger, garlic, turmeric, lavender, nettles, mullein, raspberry leaf, oat straw, skullcap, peppermint, spearmint, arnica, goldenseal root, Oregon grape root, marshmallow root, wild cherry bark, and catnip.

Some are more powerful, like ashwagandha, saw palmetto, passion flower, yarrow, blue cohosh, poke root, and a few others.

They Tend To Be Affordable

Herbs tend to be more affordable than patented drugs. That’s because there is no patent standing behind them, and no drug company recovering research money that had to go into development, and marketing, for the drug. They’re often less than $1 per oz, which prepared remedies costing up to $30 per small bottle.

They’re Ubiquitous

You can find most of the common herbs almost everywhere and anywhere. Ginger, lemon, baking soda, and epsom salts can be found in nearly every grocery or drug store. And, these things can help you relax, calm a nervous stomach, take away nausea (ginger), and help put you to sleep (epsom salts).

They’re Very Versatile

Some herbs have multiple uses. This makes them very customizable and versatile. Ginger, for example, can be used for colds and flu, inflammatory conditions, upset stomachs, and more. Lavender can be used on burns, to help relax, for headaches, and more.

You Can Prepare These Things At Home

This is a big one. You cannot make drugs in your kitchen. OK, you could, but you will probably get a visit from the FDA or some other federal agency. If you’re a DIY’er, you’ll love the fact that you can juice a ginger root, and prepare an effective treatment for a cold or upset stomach.

They’re Natural

When you make your own remedies, you are the one controlling the ingredients. There aren’t any preservatives, no unnatural ingredients you can’t pronounce, and you know exactly what goes into the mixture. If you use something like glycerine to suspend oils or liquids, you can use your own, which can be made with palm or coconut oil instead of soy (which is used in commercial preparations).

It’s Easy

You don’t need a degree to prepare a lot of this stuff. Home remedies often only have a few ingredients, and the preparation methods are simple: grinding, juicing, blending, soaking, and steeping.

In many cases, you’re making a tea or tincture of the herb or root, and then using that in your remedy. Even stuff that takes longer to make only takes longer because it takes time to sit and steep in something.

– Erin Talbot is a financial advisor who is also a spiritual woman who lives a green lifestyle as much as possible. She loves sharing her insights and experiences on the web. If you’re seeking dental treatment, visit Guardian Life to view their plans.

Alternative Medicine: Giving Your Treatment Options Another Look

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By Jessica Giles

didyouknow?Many people are giving alternative medicine another look. From potions to pills to acupuncture, and more. And, it’s not just for medical problems. They’re also looking into it for dental and oral hygiene. Here’s what it’s all about, and a few things you might want to try.

Pain Relief

Many people turn to alternative medicine because they’re unsatisfied with the way mainstream medicine handles their pain. In a study published in the American Journal Of Managed Care, researchers surveys about 6,000 people with chronic pain, and conditions which ranged in severity. Many were members of an HMO in Oregon and Washington. The researchers also got access to members’ electronic medical and health records.

They could find out what treatments these patients had used, and they wanted to see if any alternative approaches were recorded in their file. The researchers found 47% of people surveyed said they used chiropractic care for pain relief between 2009 and 2011. 32% said they used acupuncture, and 21% said they used both. A stunning 42% who went with just the chiropractor said they didn’t discuss the treatment with their medical doctor. And, 35% of people who went to an acupuncturist said they didn’t discuss it with a medical doctor.

On Pain Management

Researchers also found that the majority of patients with chronic illness and pain used acupuncture and chiropractic care. But, researchers didn’t look at whether people believed in the benefits of those treatments, compared to traditional pain control and management methods.

The most common reasons cited for not seeking chiropractic care of acupuncture was that they didn’t think the methods would help them. Some said that they hadn’t considered these pain-relief methods, and some didn’t know a reputable practitioner, or said the cost was too high.

Many of those surveyed said that they were in severe chronic pain, and lived in the U.S. on the west coast, where the use of alternative therapies are more popular than in other areas of the country.

HMOs’ coverage of these therapies is often better than in other insurance plans in other areas of the country, but the results are representative of overall usage of people who seek out alt therapies for chronic pain.

People who do have chronic pain often turn to complementary medicine because they tend to have more dialogue with alternative medicine practitioners than with doctors.

What’s The Difference?

Many people do not understand the difference between the two modalities or even between traditional or conventional medicine and alternative medicine. The first difference, is health. Conventional medicine sees health as an absence of disease. Alternative medicine often starts with the premise that balance of opposing forces is what keeps everything in check. And, that being “out of balance” causes illness.

When it comes to disease, conventional medicine sees disease as a specific thing, which is locally defined, and is classified as a deviation in organ or tissue function. Alternative medicine practitioners tend to look at the body holistically, and instead see disease as a body-wide problem.

Diagnosing Problems

Traditional medical practitioners stress morphological classification based on location and aetiology. Alt medicine, on the other hand, sees functional problems as diagnostically significant.

Therapies

Conventional medicine will often see its job as one of destruction — to destroy the sickening forces that ail the patient. Alternative medicine tries to strengthen the patient’s natural immune system so that it can fight the illness off.

How The Two Approaches See The Patient

Traditional medicine sees the patient as passive, and as a recipient of the treatment. There is little, or no, input from the patient. Medical processes are mechanical in nature. In alternative medicine, the patient is part of the treatment process. The patient’s compliance is often relied upon for success of the treatment, and patients are made aware that, if they do not comply, then success is basically impossible.

Conclusion

While both conventional and alternative medicine attempt to treat the patient, they both do it in fundamentally different ways. Conventional medicine relies heavily on pharmaceutical drugs, and mechanical interventions, for example.

Alternative medicine relies heavily on interventions where the body is asked to “step up” and heal itself. Often this involved strengthening the immune system in some way, without the use of chemicals or pharmaceutical drugs. Often, practitioners will recommend herbs and botanicals to help speed up the healing process.

– Jessica Giles is a fitness instructor. In hopes of helping others live long and healthy lives, she likes to post her insights on the web. You can find her posts on a variety of health and fitness topics which usually focus on natural and holistic health in some way. Visit Carefreedental.com to read more about alternative medicine and good dental health.

Baylor College Of Medicine Expert Dispels Nutrition Myths

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newsThis article was submitted by the Baylor College Of Medicine…..please share your comments below…..

Diet and exercise typically comes down to common sense, but we don’t always want to believe it, according to Roberta Anding, registered dietitian with Baylor College of Medicine. Instead, we’re more likely to believe the sensationalized information or fads.

Anding breaks down some common myths for us and simplifies how to eat healthy:

Myth #1: I should eat more protein because of my new exercise program

Your intensity determines your nutritional need – whether you should add more protein to your diet depends on the intensity of your workouts, and most of us are not working out at that intensity to need additional protein than what is recommended for us.

Anding says to divide up your protein throughout the day, and especially be sure to combine protein with carbohydrates for breakfast to fuel you for the day and help you control your appetite all day long. A bagel and cream cheese is not the ideal breakfast – consider half a bagel with scrambled eggs. Don’t backload your protein at the end of the day – start adding protein with breakfast.

Myth #2: BMI is the best tool for goal setting

If you never work out, you may have a higher percent body fat, whether or not you are obese according to your BMI. This can put you at risk for sarcopenic obesity, a condition in which you are losing muscle mass and adding body fat. It is possible to be normal weight but metabolically obese. Anding says the best way to determine your percent body fat is to get a Bod Pod test done. This can tell you how much of your weight is lean weight and how much is not.

Myth #3: Eating healthy is confusing

One of the keys to eating healthy is to fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables. Anding suggests if weight loss is your goal invest in smaller plates so that your portions are automatically smaller. Be sure to distinguish between a meal versus a snack. A snack for women should be less than 150 calories, and for a man should be less than 200 calories. To limit snack portions, put your snack on a plate rather than picking at food – this will hold you more accountable for your portion size.

Myth #4: Organic food will prevent chronic illness

There is no scientific data to support this. Eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables and focusing on a plant-based diet has been shown to prevent chronic illnesses. Consider purchasing a fruit and vegetable brush to wash your produce with before consuming it if you are worried about pesticides.

Myth #5: High fructose corn syrup is the reason for America’s weight crisis

applescaleCompared to Americans in the 1970s, we now eat 500 calories more and exercise less. This is what’s contributing to the weight crisis. Americans eat too much sugar in all forms. The new Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting sugars. Focus on added sugars, not the natural sugar in milk or fruits.

Myth #6: Muscle weighs more than fat

Muscle is more compact than fat, but one pound is one pound. Anding says that what you choose to put in your body is what makes all the difference. However, increasing your weight through adding muscle is advantageous. Increasing your muscle mass increases the amount of calories you burn at rest since the muscle is the metabolic engine.

Inside The Medicine Bag: Tools For Awakening Consciousness – Part 2

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Excerpted from Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag: A Transformational Guide for Living, Happy, Joyous and Free

By Lee McCormick and Mary Falkner, co-authors of Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

seniorwoman2Exercise 3–Transforming Blocks

Taking the top quality you identified in the second part of Exercise 2, close your eyes, and breathe down into your belly. Speaking to wise mind (the intuitive part of you), ask what gets in the way of fully living the quality you have chosen to embody-for example, if you chose the quality creativity, ask, “What is blocking me from experiencing my creativity?” Sit quietly with that question while your deep memory searches the files. Did someone tell me I wasn’t creative (or beautiful or handsome or wonderful . . . )? Did I believe it? Do I need to believe it now?

There may be more than one message or belief involved, but you don’t have to locate every single thing that’s part of the block. Often one or two toxic messages will unlock the whole mess. This process is natural; allow it to happen rather than putting demands on yourself.

There may be more than one message or belief involved, but you don’t have to locate every single thing that’s part of the block. Often one or two toxic messages will unlock the whole mess. This process is natural; allow it to happen rather than putting demands on yourself.

Exercise 4–Dreaming the Real You

Anything less than loving yourself indicates you are living a nightmare, not dreaming an awakened dream. This exercise will help you get out of the bad dream and into the one that was written on your heart by your creator.

Talk, write, and/or draw pictures about your transformed life and your ideal self until you feel the feelings of it and it begins to feel like it’s yours. Notice where in your body you feel these emotions, and breathe into those areas, grounding them in your body-giving them life. Practice consciously breathing into the feelings or the sense of your ideal self for several minutes each night as you are going to sleep and again when you first wake up. At those times and at intervals throughout the day, the brain naturally slows down into what are called alpha brainwaves-a highly creative and healing state of mind. During those intervals, energizing your dream is most effective.

As you imagine your ideal self and your transformed life, notice what blocks you from fully entering this new dream. Notice where your mind wants to take you-for example, you might find it saying things like “Wake up and get real; you’re just daydreaming,” “Life isn’t like that,” and “Yeah, right . . .”

Write these blocks down or create a drawing or other piece of art that represents them. Often, there may be additional subconscious beliefs holding you back, such as “I don’t deserve . . .,” I can’t do . . .,” “I’m just crazy; it’s useless . . .,” “If I change, it will mean I was wrong all these years . . .,” and so on.

When you have identified the blocks and are ready to give them up, create a ceremony in which you will symbolize letting them go and allowing them to transform. Fire and water are traditional symbols of transformation.

Letting go of beliefs we have carried throughout life can be challenging, but it is totally possible. It’s not unusual to repeat and repeat and repeat your efforts–each time reaching deeper into yourself. You are clearing patterns that have come down through your genetics for generations. It’s like peeling the onion–one layer uncovers another and another and another. In cases of childhood trauma, the patterns are stored deep in the limbic system, and, in addition to your sincere intention and steadfast attention, healing them may require therapeutic assistance. The limbic system can be updated. You can heal. Don’t give up before the miracle, and get more help if you need it.

– Lee McCormick and Mary Faulkner are the co-authors Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag; A Transformational Guide for Living, Happy, Joyous and Free (HCI Books.) an essential and life-changing resource that is half autobiographical journey and half medicine bag filled with spiritual healing practices for those who are struggling with any aspect of life. Offering a way out of life’s maze, Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag is a guide for finding the way back to one’s personal truth, authenticity and purpose by shedding the stories that we tell ourselves about or own lives. The book draws on Native American and shamanistic traditions, Eastern practices, universal spiritual pathways, and a medicine bag of other heart-opening methodologies developed by these two seasoned experts. Readers are given the tools to step away from addictive, compulsive behaviors that hold them back, so they experience real happiness and joy as their spirit soars– Living Happy, Joyous and Free! For more information, go to SpiritRecovery.com or hibooks.com.

Inside The Medicine Bag: Tools For Awakening Consciousness – Part 1

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Excerpted from Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag: A Transformational Guide for Living, Happy, Joyous and Free

By Lee McCormick and Mary Falkner, co-authors of Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag

mansmileSpirit Recovery Medicine Bag is a guide for finding the way back to one’s personal truth, authenticity and purpose by shedding the stories that we tell ourselves about or own lives. The book draws on Native American and shamanistic traditions, Eastern practices, universal spiritual pathways, and a medicine bag of other heart-opening methodologies developed by two seasoned experts, Lee McCormick and Mary Falkner. Readers are given the tools to step away from addictive, compulsive behaviors that hold them back, so they experience real happiness and joy as their spirit soars– Living Happy, Joyous and Free!

The following exercises from the book are highly transformational. You will be awakening aspects of yourself that you have possibly been out of touch with for a long time. Work slowly and repeat exercises as needed.

Exercise 1–Exploring Your Hopes and Dreams

Your journey in consciousness begins by exploring your hopes and dreams. This is the first step in claiming your truth. To explore your hopes and dreams, consider these questions:

* What do I long for?
* What does it feel like?
* What about life hooks my imagination?
* What does that feel like?
* What would I do if I weren’t afraid?
* What would fearlessness feel like?

Writing down your answers in your journal makes them more powerful. Sharing them with someone else makes them even more powerful. While transformation is personal, it happens best when we work together. Keep your list handy, as you will be referring back to it during these exercises and as you practice them in the future.

Exercise 2–Dreaming the New Dream

Find a quiet place where you won’t be interrupted for an hour or so. Get comfortable, relax, and allow yourself to get in touch with your deep hopes and dreams. You might begin with the question we often ask kids, What do you want to be when you grow up? If you have any trouble finding an answer, give the question more time. Put it on the back burner. There is no need to rush to find your answers. Your brain is wired for curiosity and creativity-it likes wondering, and it will find your answer. You don’t have to know before you know.

Next, change the focus from your career goals to the type of person you want to be. What qualities or characteristics do you want to embody? For example, transformation encourages us to live from the heart, cultivate a positive mind, be of service, and live honestly. What values or characteristics would this require-for example, creativity, bravery, humor, cooperation, peace? In your journal, make a list and don’t worry about how you can develop these qualities. They are on the human hard drive; you just have to download them and live them. From the items on your list, pick the top three-the ones you most want to have in your life. Now select one, and imagine how it feels to have this quality.

Experience this quality emotionally, and breathe it in fully. Keep imagining your life with this quality until you can feel it physically. Notice where in your body the feeling resonates. Toxic beliefs that cloud your new vision begin to come to mind, giving you the opportunity to choose to invest in them further or let them go. Some will dissolve on their own. Others may require deeper investigation. This is you transforming into you.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Lee McCormick and Mary Faulkner are the co-authors Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag; A Transformational Guide for Living, Happy, Joyous and Free (HCI Books.) an essential and life-changing resource that is half autobiographical journey and half medicine bag filled with spiritual healing practices for those who are struggling with any aspect of life. Offering a way out of life’s maze, Spirit Recovery Medicine Bag is a guide for finding the way back to one’s personal truth, authenticity and purpose by shedding the stories that we tell ourselves about or own lives. The book draws on Native American and shamanistic traditions, Eastern practices, universal spiritual pathways, and a medicine bag of other heart-opening methodologies developed by these two seasoned experts. Readers are given the tools to step away from addictive, compulsive behaviors that hold them back, so they experience real happiness and joy as their spirit soars– Living Happy, Joyous and Free! For more information, go to SpiritRecovery.com or hibooks.com.

AMA Sports Medicine Confirms Need For Cross-Training Among Young Athletes

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By Warren Potash

boyssportsYouth sports participation over the past 20+ years has resulted in more sports injuries than ever before – not due to more female athletes playing sports. Obviously, this has caused the American Medical Association [AMA] take a hard look at what can be done to reverse this trend. The AMA issued a Position Paper in November 2013 that broadly reflects their concerns. This is a few of the points made:

* Sport specialization may be considered as intensive, year-round training in a single sport at the exclusion of other sports.

* There is concern that early sport specialization may increase rates of overuse injury and sport burnout…

* Diversified sports training during early and middle adolescence may be more effective in developing elite-level skills in the primary sport due to skill transfer.

Reference found here…..

These points are very important issues. What’s interesting is that I wrote They’re Not Boys – Safely Training the Adolescent Female Athlete [2012] to provide quality information about the too high injury rate in female sports participation. The AMA’s Sports Medicine division almost two (2) years later came to identical recommendations. So, what can adults who are volunteer coaches learn from this valuable information?

Cross training, using the body in different ways, during early ages is best accomplished by having youngsters play more than one sport. I discourage real training to play sports at early ages and encourage youngsters to have FUN and performing movement patterns that lead to rhythm and coordination. Therefore, the one sport athlete should not be encouraged despite what is happening in youth sports today.

Even though burnout and overuse injuries do not have evidence-based research to prove out the recommendation about early sport specialization, it stands to reason that if the same muscle groups are used the same way over time – the possibility of injuries and burnout are greater; it’s common sense.

teensElite-level skill development is just that. How many elite-level athletes are there who can demand the type of attention from college coaches? Not many!! About 4 million youngsters are in a pool from their youth sport days and less than one percent (1%) obtains the offers. So, for the vast majority 99%+, it’s far better to train to play sports after trying different sports. This allows each athlete the opportunity to decide in early adolescence whether they want to specialize in just one sport; i.e., the one (or two) sports they most enjoy.

Let’s be clear about the carrot and stick approach in youth sports today. Volunteer coaches tell athletes and parents that if you play with my team, you will gain more exposure from college coaches leading to a scholarship offer. While this has truth to the statement, the facts are that very few female athletes receive scholarships just based on their athletic ability.

Did you know that an athlete who has very good to excellent grades will get money from a D III school than an athlete without top grades? How can that be? D III doesn’t offer scholarships. Coaches are seeking “coachable” athletes and those who excel in time management for academics and sports, etc. The admissions departments often work with coaches to provide scholarship dollars to help these athletes matriculate at their schools.

Youth sports and adolescent sport participation is really life skills training that an individual realizes many years after their sport participation days are completed. Learning responsibility for their own actions and in team sports understanding how a group of athletes needs to work together for the common good helps young women mature into adulthood.

The emphasis needs to be on movement, fitness, sport, and life skills training. A leading trainer of professional, elite athletes puts it this way: “Based on the statistics, we have failed in our physical education and physical fitness programs for youth.” (SkillFit – A Blueprint for Building Physical Skills, Youth Edition. Kent Johnston; 2013)

Make certain you understand why your child(ren) is playing sports and make sure that sport participation provides opportunities for FUN and fitness first – not winning from an early age that can be detrimental to long term success. Youngsters need a program where they have FUN, develop movement patterns and sport skills that are safe and age-appropriate so they are minimizing their risk for injury and becoming the best student-athlete each can be.

Warren J. Potash, Specialist in Exercise Therapy and Sports Nutrition and Sports Performance Coach Author: They’re Not Boys – Safely Training the Adolescent Female Athlete (2012) and co-author Your Lower Back (1993)

Q & A: What is Holistic Medicine?

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Q & A with Dr. Michael Wald

informationred1. Is there a difference between the terms holistic, alternative, complimentary, integrated and natural healthcare?

Answer: Yes. Although there are no universally decided upon definitions of these terms, here are some reasonable definitions:

a.) Holistic – Holistic implies that the practitioner is open-minded towards a variety of healing modalities no matter where they come from (i.e., from traditional medicine or natural medicine). However, many holistic practitioners consider themselves holistic even though they only practice natural medicine and do not ever refer to medical doctors.

b.) Alternative – This term commonly implies that the practitioner and his/her approaches are not found in mainstream medicine and are therefore considered alternative. These approaches are considered “not medically necessary” or “not approved” by allopathic mainstream physicians or insurance companies.

c.) Complimentary medicine – A more vague term implying that the healing methods/philosophies of the practitioner include at least some traditional medical approaches along with natural approaches.

d.) Integrated – Integrated medicine is our personal favorite, which is why we call ourselves “Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco”. For us, integrated means the intelligent and balanced consideration of any form of healing method that is available; choosing the safest, most effective methods for each individual patient in the context of their belief system. Whether it is from allopathic medicine, Chinese medicine,
Ayurveda, American herbal medicine, diet, prescription medications, imaging modalities and/or diet, etc. Testing is also utilized to develop individualized treatments.

e.) Natural – Natural medicine implies that the practitioner uses healing methods that are completely natural based on diet and common nutritional supplements – in other words, whatever is found or made from nature and is not a prescription drug.

2. Is there a difference among the knowledge and education of various types of “nutritional” practitioners such as dieticians, clinical nutritionists, certified clinical nutritionists, certified nutritional specialists, board certified nutritionists and nutritional counselors?

Answer: The educational degree is certainly not the only factor that determines the nutritional competency of a practitioner. Their education does offer an opportunity for the practitioner to be exposed to information, which he or she may take to heart and deliver in a clinically effective way. At Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, our practitioners have a combination of practically every major degree in nutrition available. Dr. Michael Wald is perhaps the most highly qualified “nutritionist” in the United States with a medical education, a chiropractic degree, a certified clinical nutritionist degree, a certified nutrition specialist degree, two board certifications in nutrition, a Master’s degree in nutrition as well as other qualifications. Go to www.intmedny.com for more information.

3. Is a nutritionist qualified to order and perform laboratory work?

Answer: No. Nutritionists, in no program that we are aware of in the United States, receive any formal training in laboratory assessment. Laboratory assessment is highly complex and requires knowledge of body systems, physiology and biochemistry that is generally well beyond the scope of standard nutrition educational programs. A nutritionist who is not working with a qualified practitioner who can read
laboratory work, like our own “Blood Detectives”, should not order and/or offer to interpret laboratory work including blood typing. Please read under the Services section on our Blood Detective website for more information on our philosophy towards improving health through individualized nutritional and diet suggestions based upon your unique biochemistry.

4. Are the opinions of standard medical doctors of value in the area of nutrition?

Answer: Our experience says no. The average MD in the US has four (4) hours of nutritional education and it is superficial at best. A weekend course also does not make an MD qualified to give nutritional advice or to necessarily criticize unfamiliar nutritional approaches.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Blood Pressure Lowering Medicine Chest: Your Local Farmer’s Market!

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By Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, LDN

saladheartsmallSpring is in the air, the flowers are blooming, the birds are chirping, and the grass is getting green, green, green… all signs that summer is right around the corner. The warm weather is also a signal that the cornucopia of locally grown fruits and vegetables is also just around the corner at the nearest farmer’s market. Why favor farmers’ markets over the grocery store? There are several main reasons: the food is fresher (healthier), the food is seasonal, the food is locally grown (you support local farmers) and you get a better variety of foods. Make sure you frequent your local farmer’s market often, the ultimate health food store!

Farmers’ markets are also a veritable drugstore for blood pressure lowering superfoods. When shopping for these superfoods, here are the three blood pressure lowering mineral superstars you need to keep in mind: potassium, magnesium and calcium. How do you choose the food highest in these minerals? Simple–I have included my “Mining for Minerals Charts” from my new book, Blood Pressure Down. Cut them out and carry them to the Farmer’s Market and when you see these foods, buy them, eat them and watch your blood pressure drop!
Mining for Minerals:

See it, Eat it Pocket Charts©

For Potassium
Super-High* Foods
Cantaloupe
Casaba Melon
Honeydew Melon
Artichokes
Beet greens
Cooked Spinach
Swiss Chard
White Beans
Low Sodium V8
Prunes
* Each food contains over 400 mg potassium per 1/2 cup serving

Very High** Foods
Apricots
Bananas
Dried Fruits
Brussels Sprouts
Pumpkin
Cooked Mushrooms
Chocolate (dark)
Squash
Potatoes
Kiwi
** Each food contains over 250 mg potassium per 1/2 cup serving

For Magnesium
Super-High* Foods
Cooked Spinach
White Beans
Corn
Swiss Chard
Purslane
Dry-roasted unsalted almonds
Halibut
Quinoa
Brown Rice
*Each food contains 100 mg magnesium per typical serving size

Very High** Foods
Brewed Espresso
Clams
Brewed Coffee
Peanut Butter (low sodium)
Avocado
Fat Free Yogurt
Kidney and Pinto Beans
Dry Roasted unsalted peanuts
Baked Potato (with skin)
** Each food contains 50 mg magnesium per typical serving size

For Calcium
Super-High* Foods
Non-fat Yogurt
Soy Milk
Fortified Fat Free Milk
Collard Greens
Cheeses: low sodium
Parmesan Cheese
Swiss Cheese
Light Mozzarella
Low Fat Cottage Cheese
Part Skim Ricotta 1/2 cup
*Each food contains over 300 mg calcium per typical serving size

Very High** Foods
Tofu
Canned Salmon
Edamame
Bok Choy
Blackstrap Molasses
** Each food contains over 150 mg calcium per typical serving size

– Excerpted from Blood Pressure Down by Janet Bond Brill, Ph.D., R.D., LDN

– Article submitted by Kate Bandos, KSB Promotions

What Is Holistic Medicine?

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qaQ & A With Dr. Michael Wald

What is the difference between various complimentary healthcare approaches?

1. Is there a difference between the terms holistic, alternative, complimentary, integrated and natural healthcare?

Answer: Yes. Although there are no universally decided upon definitions of these terms, here are some reasonable definitions:

a.) Holistic – Holistic implies that the practitioner is open-minded towards a variety of healing modalities no matter where they come from (i.e., from traditional medicine or natural medicine). However, many holistic practitioners consider themselves holistic even though they only practice natural medicine and do not ever refer to medical doctors.

b.) Alternative – This term commonly implies that the practitioner and his/her approaches are not found in mainstream medicine and therefore considered alternative. These approaches are considered “not medically necessary” or “not approved” by allopathic mainstream physicians or insurance companies.

c.) Complimentary medicine – A more vague term implying that the healing methods/philosophies of the practitioner include at least some traditional medical approaches along with natural approaches.

d.) Integrated – Integrated medicine is our personal favorite which is why we call ourselves “Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco”. For us, integrated means the intelligent and balanced consideration of any form of healing method that is available; choosing the safest, most effective methods for each individual patient in the context of their belief system. Whether it is from allopathic medicine, Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, American herbal medicine, diet, prescription medications, imaging modalities and/or diet, etc. Testing is also utilized to develop individualized treatments.

e.) Natural – Natural medicine implies that the practitioner uses healing methods that are completely natural based on diet and common nutritional supplements – in other words, whatever is found or made from nature and is not a prescription drug.

2. Is there a difference among the knowledge and education of various types of “nutritional” practitioners such as dieticians, clinical nutritionists, certified clinical nutritionists, certified nutritional specialists, board certified nutritionists and nutritional counselors?

Answer: The educational degree is certainly not the only factor that determines the nutritional competency of a practitioner. Their education does offer an opportunity for the practitioner to be exposed to information, which he or she may take to heart and deliver in a clinically effective way. At Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco our practitioners have a combination of practically every single major degree in nutrition available. Dr. Michael Wald is perhaps the most highly qualified “nutritionist” in the United States with a medical education, a chiropractic degree, a certified clinical nutritionist degree, a certified nutrition specialist degree, two board certifications in nutrition, a Master’s degree in nutrition as well as other qualifications. Go to www.intmedny.com for more information.

3. Is a nutritionist qualified to order and perform laboratory work?

Answer: No. Nutritionists, in no program that we are aware of in the United States, receive any formal training in laboratory assessment. Laboratory assessment is highly complex and requires knowledge of body systems and physiology and biochemistry that is generally well beyond the scope of standard nutrition educational programs. A nutritionist who is not working with a qualified practitioner who can read laboratory work, like our own “Blood Detectives”, should not order and/or offer to interpret laboratory work including blood typing. Please
read under the Services section on our Blood Detective website for more information on our philosophy towards improving health through individualized nutritional and diet suggestions based upon your unique biochemistry.

4. Are the opinions of standard medical doctors of value in the area of nutrition?

Answer: Our experience says no. The average MD in the US has four (4) hours of nutritional education and it is superfi cial at best. A weekend course also does not make an MD qualifi ed to give nutritional advice or to necessarily criticize unfamiliar nutritional approaches.

– Dr. Michael Wald, Brain-Energy Blast