Children’s Hunger Fund Reports Over 22 Million Meals Distributed To Children

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb. What are your thoughts? Please share in the comments section below…..

applevectorsmallChildren’s Hunger Fund reports that in 2014 they delivered over 22 million meals to hungry kids in the US and around the world – a new record in the charity’s 24-year history. Not content with that record breaking number, Children’s Hunger Fund has launched a new initiative, ‘Think Inside the Box” which aims to deliver 25 million meals to suffering families in 2015.

“We are so grateful to our supporters, corporate donors, churches, and volunteers who enabled us to distribute such an extraordinary amount of meals to children in crisis. We are humbled by their generosity and sacrifice,” says Dave Phillips, President and Founder of Children’s Hunger Fund.

Children’s Hunger Fund uses a unique method of distribution to get the food and other aid to hurting families. The Food Pak box contains about 20 pounds of non-perishable food, which will create about 48 meals for a family. This food is packed by volunteers (over 25,000 in 2014) who serve at Children’s Hunger Fund’s Distribution Centers in Los Angeles, San Antonio, and Chicago. Food Pak boxes are then hand delivered to needy families by trained volunteers from churches within the families’ own communities, both in the U.S. and in cities around the world.

Children’s Hunger Fund calls the initiative ‘Think Inside the Box’ because food is not the only component found inside the box. Intangibles like hope, love and faith are the built-in components that lead to change lives.

“One aspect of ‘Think Inside the Box’ that I find compelling is that a meal can be sent for only 25 cents,” continues Dave Phillips. “This creates an easy opportunity for American kids and families to reach out and help hungry children. Just 1 dollar sends 4 meals ”

For almost 25 years, Children’s Hunger Fund has delivered over $1 billion in food and other aid to kids across America and around the world. This is done with a lifetime average of 99% efficiency because of corporate donors and willing volunteers.

More information and how to get involved is available at ChildrensHungerFund.org/THINK.

About Children’s Hunger Fund

Children’s Hunger Fund was founded 24 years ago in Los Angeles to serve needy children. Since then, 99% of total contributions—over 1 billion dollars in food and other aid—has been distributed through programs serving more than 20 million children across America and 72 countries around the world. Over 25,000 volunteers are utilized each year to maximize their reach and impact while minimizing overhead. Children’s Hunger Fund strives to operate with total financial integrity and efficiency and is listed by CharityNavigator.org, MinistryWatch.org and Forbes.com as one of the most cost-effective charities in the nation. More info can be found at ChildrensHungerFund.org.

Paying Attention To Your Meals Will Help You Lose Weight

Share Button

By Ann Musico

bigpantsLife is busy for everyone, whether you are a stay-at-home mom or the CEO of a corporation. So many of us eat on the go. We grab a burger and fries from the drive through, scarfing it down in the car or we stand at the kitchen counter bolting down our meal. Even something healthy like a smoothie can be gulped in the car on the way to work. Honestly you may be thinking – so what? What does this have to do with weight loss? As long as I’m not eating too many calories, what difference does it make?

More than you may have imagined. First of all, studies show that eating fast blocks the hormones that signal you are full and satisfied and lead to overeating. But there is another reason I want to focus on.

When you inhale your food, rather than treating it as a meal that you are aware of, and enjoy, savoring how it looks, smells and tastes, you will find that even though you may feel full physically, not long after you are searching the refrigerator for something else to eat! You see, your cells are starving and sending the message that they still need nourishment. They always say you eat with your eyes first – and there’s a lot of truth to that!

You can overeat and be obese yet in fact still be malnourished at the cellular level and many people are. This is part of the reason why. Choosing calorie-dense foods with little nutritional value is the other reason. But even if you eat healthy food in this mindless way, you won’t get the full nutritional value.

exercisebrainYou really have two brains – one in your head and one in your digestive tract! You may think you can fool the one in your gut, but you can’t! If your brain doesn’t fully experience the taste, smell, texture, pleasure and satisfaction from your meals, it interprets that missed experience as hunger! Even if you just filled your belly!

So as often as possible, sit down at the table, pay attention to the food, enjoy it, savor it and eat it slowly and mindfully. Even if it is a smoothie – savor the creaminess, flavor and aroma. Beginning the meal with a prayer of thanks is a perfect way to slow down and be intentional about fully experiencing your meal. Not only will you improve your digestion, you will also find losing weight becomes easier – and much more enjoyable!

“I encourage you to pay attention to how you eat the majority of your meals: mindfully or mindlessly.”

– Ann Musico is a holistic health coach who helps women, at every age, to exemplify lives of vibrant health and wholeness – spirit, soul and body. Her mission is to show women how to adopt a healthy lifestyle in a way that is simple and achievable, empowering them to take responsibility for their own health in order to be a positive influence on their families. You can visit her website at threedimensionalvitality.com

Healthy Diet Basics And Unhealthy Food – Part 2

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Wald

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

watercup7. When you eat healthy carbohydrates do not eat them alone. Instead, add proteins to all of your meals and snacks.

Suggestion: Protein will slow down the absorption of carbohydrates helping to level out blood sugar. Fluxuations in blood sugar can cause attention deficit, fatigue, slow metabolism and increased disease risk.

8. Add sea salt to your regular diet to help keep your adrenal glands stay in shape.

9. Drink plenty of water each day (body weight divided by 2, multiplied by 0.8 is the number of ounces your body needs, more if you are exercising). Avoid caffeinated and carbonated beverages; caffeine is a diuretic (loss of fluids and minerals) and carbonated soft drinks leach calcium from bones). Herbal teas, fresh vegetables and fruit juices are healthy to consume. Diluted bottled juices and naturally decaffeinated beverages are OK in moderation.

10. Eat several small meals throughout the day instead of two or three large meals. Smaller meals spaced fairly evenly throughout the day help balance blood sugar levels and each the stress of digestion.

11. Chew your food thoroughly. Chewing signals the “feeding centers” and “satiety” centers in your brain that tell you when you are full so you do not overeat. Chewing also aids the digestive process starting in the mouth and signals the rest of the gastrointestinal tract to “get ready” for food on the way.

12. Consider not drinking fluids of any kind with your meals or at least sipping fluids as opposed to gulping them down in large volumes. Fluids can dilute digestive juices impairing optimal digestion of foods.

stress13. Do not eat when you are stressed or on the run. Proper digestion involves activating a part of your nervous and digestive system, which is active during a more relaxed state (i.e., like during a meal). A different part of the nervous system is activated when you are up-and-around which is not conducive to optimal digestion of foods.

14. Eat every two hours. Small meals consumed throughout the course of the day balances blood sugar. Problems with blood sugar promote weight gain, diabetes and cardiovascular risk and other health problems.

15. Supplement a healthy diet with a good quality multi-vitamin/mineral complex and other nutrients indicated by your individual health needs

Suggestion: Have nutritional and medical laboratory work performed to find out more exactly the nutrition that you require as an individual.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Healthy Diet Basics And Unhealthy Food – Part 1

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Wald

greenpeppers1. Increase the amount of whole, unprocessed foods in your diet (fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains, beans, raw nuts and seeds), relative to the amount of processed foods you consume (pasta, bread, packaged foods).

Suggestion: Switch from white bread to whole wheat or multigrain.

2. Diversify your diet by including new and different foods in your diet each week. Rotate the foods you eat so that you do not consume a given food every day. The foods should not be processed, fried or contain added sugars and preservatives.

Suggestion: At the very least, eat one or two new and healthy foods per week and increase from there. Focus on adding new foods as opposed to removing everything that you currently eat. Overtime your diet will transform for the better!

3. A fat free diet is not healthy! Fat should constitute 20-30% of your total diet generally speaking. Limit saturated fats (fast found in animal products) to less than 10% of your daily diet. Avoid fried foods, hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils and cottonseed oil (read the label). Healthy oils to consume include: unsaturated essential omega 3, omega 6 and omega 9 fatty acids found in flax seed oil and seeds, olive oil (cold pressed, virgin, imported and in a tin to protect from light), canola oil, salmon, cod, tuna, mackerel, currants, raw nuts and seeds (roasting the nuts and seeds saturates the oils in them and this is not at all healthy). Store oils and nuts/seeds in the refrigerator. Roasted nuts and seeds contain saturated fats that put on weight and increase your risk of heart disease, cancer and other degenerative conditions.

Suggestion: Eat avocados, use fresh olive oil in salads and cooking, eat raw nuts and seeds. Eat baked or broiled salmon

fruitsalad4. Eat a high fiber diet by consuming vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, and seeds, and by minimizing your intake of meats and refined foods (i.e., desserts, table sugar, candy).

Suggestion: Exchange meats for chicken, turkey and fish. Limit fish to no more than once per week or less if you are overweight and have hypercholesteremia (high blood fats).

5. Ensure you eat sufficient protein each day (about 15-20% of your diet). Good protein sources include lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, soy products, beans, low-fat dairy products, nuts and food combining of grains/beans/vegetables.

6. Decrease or eliminate refined and processed sugars from your diet. As a substitute, use natural, unprocessed sugars high in the vitamins and minerals needed to help digest them, including 100% pure maple syrup, fruit-only jams, fresh fruit, honey, molasses, barley malt, brown rice syrup and carob.

Suggestions: Not all sugar is the same. Sugar found in most desserts and table sugar (sucrose) is called simple sugar; simple sugar consumption (even in small amounts) is known to cause inflammation in the body, increase blood fats, promote weight gain, reduce ability to loose weight and increase your risk of developing these and other diseases: diabetes, heart and vessel disease, hypertention, cancers, autoimmune disease, chronic fatigue, etc.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Peter Piper’s Pepper Picks

Share Button

By Kac Young PhD, ND DCH

If Peter Piper truly picked a peck of peppers, then he had 1/4 of a bushel or 2 US dry gallons. Were they red, green, yellow, orange, purple or all of the above? What did Peter Piper do with his peppers once he picked them? We assume he made a feast for the neighborhood.

He might have chosen to cook Heart Easy stuffed peppers that are low in calories, full of vitamins A and C, folic acid, Vitamin B6 and an excellent source of dietary fiber.

In his red bell peppers, he got bonus lycopene, an important carotenoid that may have helped protect him against prostate and other cancers.

Peter may have already known that bell peppers, adaptable plants that are part of the nightshade family, are fairly hardy and can be grown in a variety of climates. Versatile geographic gems, bell peppers are found in many types of traditional cuisines, from Mexican and European to Chinese and Creole dishes. Delicious many ways, bell peppers can be eaten raw as crudités or in a salad; stuffed and baked; sautéed or stir-fried.

We’ve added some protein and given a new kick for Peter Piper’s Peck of Peppers. Try this recipe and fill your family with goodness and enjoyment of one of nature’s greatest treats.

stuffed pepper with rice and beansHeart Easy ™ Stuffed Peter Piper Peppers with Triple Rice and Beans

Ingredients:

1 Cup red beans soaked in 2 Cups of water overnight and drained

1 Cup of brown rice

1 Cup wild rice

1 Cup coarsely chopped onion

1 packet of condensed low sodium non fat chicken broth dissolved in 3 Cups of water (or 3 Cups of low sodium non fat chicken broth) Do not use the high sodium chicken stock cubes.

16-20 oz. ground turkey breast

2 tsp. cold pressed virgin olive oil

1 16 oz. can chopped tomatoes with basil, drained

1/2 tsp. Kosher salt

1/2 tsp. fresh ground black pepper

1/2 Cup SoySation ® 3 Cheese blend

4-6 red or green bell peppers, cleaned and tops cut off. (scallop the edges if you wish)

Directions:

recipeskacyoungCombine soaked and plumped beans with dry rices, onion and chicken broth in a large kettle. Bring to boil and simmer for 40-45 minutes. Meanwhile, put the olive oil in a skillet and brown the ground turkey breast until the pink has disappeared. Break up turkey breast with a potato masher until the texture is fine pieces. Set aside.

When beans and rice are ready, add tomatoes and stir. Add turkey, SoySation®, seasonings and stir. Fill prepared peppers with mixture, place in an oven-proof baking dish and bake at 350˚ for 30-35 minutes. Serve hot or warm.

Tip: Only purchase bell peppers that are free of blemishes, and try to hold out for organically grown varieties.

– Kac Young, a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. In the Heart Easy Cook Book sound nutritional advice is followed by family favorites that have been turned into heart healthy meals anyone can make and everyone will love.

Offending Foods – Part 2

Share Button

By Mark Pitstick, MA, DC

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

cookiesAfter 30 days of eliminating a food, re-introduce it to your diet and see if there are immediate inflammatory responses such as rash, itching, burning eyes or sinus drainage. Next, wait two days to see if any bowel, mental or musculo-skeletal symptoms arrive. If that food seems OK, add it to your diet but no more than three times per week. Then test another food until you’ve gone through the list of suspected food allergies.

In my opinion, a nutritional-based healthcare program is the best way to test for food allergies. The best ones I know of include Nutrition Response Testing, System Strength Analysis, Applied Kinesiology, Contact Reflex Technique, Bio-Meridian and Stressor Nutrient Balancing. Do a search for one of these techniques and find the best practitioner near you. Feel free to contact me if I can help you or your loved ones in any way.

These methods detect stressors such as food allergies and offending foods. Treatment includes avoiding offending foods for 90 days and perhaps taking digestive enzymes and/or betaine hydrochloride to facilitate elimination of food residues in the body.

Food allergies can also be nature’s way of saying it doesn’t like the quality of that food. For example, were the tomatoes you ate chemical-free or not? Was the beef grass-fed and pastured raised? Pasteurized milk from pen-raised cows receiving hormones and antibiotics is understandably more likely to cause health problems than certified raw dairy products from pasture raised cows.

Likewise, people are often allergic to “commercial eggs”—those from chickens raised in unhealthy conditions. In this case, the words “organic” and “free range” can’t be trusted due to business lobbyists affecting food-labeling laws. “Organic” chicken eggs can only mean that the hens were fed organic feed—even though they were raised in cramped cages. Similarly, “free range” eggs can mean that the chickens had access to a small concrete pen during half of their short lives.

Allergies to farm fresh or pastured hen eggs are rare and the eggs are more nutritious and healthy. Likewise, some people with wheat or other grain allergies can handle products from Europe that have not been subjected to genetic modification, herbicides and pesticides. Read books and articles by journalist Michael Pollan to learn more about this topic that is so important for the health of you and your family throughout the generations.

The health status of a person also affects what foods he or she is “allergic” to.

The health status of a person also affects what foods he or she is “allergic” to. For example, foods containing yeast (wine, beer, aged cheeses, bread, pretzels, cider) may be especially problematic for those with an overgrowth of yeast in their body. Also, if a person’s filtration organs (colon, liver, kidneys) are overwhelmed, a person may be “allergic” to more foods than if those systems were functioning normally.

By the way, some environmental allergies (pet hair, dust, mold, pollen, grass and other unavoidable particles) are actually secondary allergies because of primary food allergies. Many clinicians have found that “environmental allergies” decrease or disappear when food allergies are addressed

In short, becoming truly healthy and eating moderate amounts of healthfully raised foods may be the solution versus avoiding supposedly allergenic foods the rest of your life. Work with your health care practitioners to see how this applies to you.

Mark Pitstick, B.S., M.A., D.C., has over forty years experience and training in hospitals, pastoral counseling settings, mental health centers, and holistic private practice. His training includes a premedical degree, graduate theology/pastoral counseling studies, masters in clinical psychology, and doctorate in chiropractic. His book Radiant Wellness: A Holistic Guide for Optimal Body, Mind and Spirit was endorsed by Drs. Deepak Chopra, Wayne Dyer, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Bernie Siegel and others. Mark has been a frequent radio and TV guest and hosted a nationally syndicated radio show. He has presented many workshops on holistic health and spiritual awareness. He has been a review editor and regular contributor to many magazines and e-zines. Mark founded the Radiant Wellness Center and the Stressor-Nutrient Balancing healing method.

Disclaimer: Listing improvements of past patients’ problems does not imply a guarantee for those with similar conditions. I do not claim to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. I do teach people and health care professionals how to assist the body in healing itself of imbalances.

Offending Foods – Part 1

Share Button

By Mark Pitstick, MA, DC

peanutfreeAs I know very well from personal experience, food allergies can cause many serious physical and mental symptoms. I was nearly fifty years old before figuring out that I am allergic to wheat, dairy, corn, soy and sugar. Do you know how many meals and processed foods those five are in?

I suffered with many symptoms—clues from my body that it couldn’t tolerate those foods. Those symptoms hurt the quality of my life as a family member, friend, doctor and teacher. I did a good job . . . but not always the outstanding level that is possible.

Now I eat the real food diet 95 percent of the time and can tolerate occasionally eating a little bit of those foods. Addressing my food allergies has been a huge part of feeling happy, healthy and energetic almost all of the time.

That’s one reason I’m so passionate about getting this basic wellness information out to as many people as possible. Children shouldn’t have to suffer because of food allergies nor should adults have to search high and low for solutions to their health problems. It’s hard to know and show your fullest potentials when you feel tired, depressed and out of balance.

Food allergies can cause many serious physical and mental symptoms. Allergies create inflammatory changes that, in turn, contribute to symptoms of the bowel (diarrhea, constipation, bloating, excess gas), musculo-skeletal system (joint and muscle soreness and stiffness), “mental problems” (depression, brain fog, anxiety, panic, fatigue), cardiovascular system and other areas.

Food allergies can cause many serious physical and mental symptoms.

Marshall Mandell, M.D., author of Allergy, the Unrecognized Cause of Physical, Mental, and Psycho-somatic Illness, says that processed foods containing sugar and white flour are common triggers of food allergies. Canned foods offend more often than fresh sources.

The most common allergy producing foods are dairy products, wheat, yeast, eggs, sugar, corn and soy. Nonfat and low-fat varieties of cow’s milk are especially troublesome because there’s less fat to buffer casein, the allergy-producing protein in milk. Allergies to gluten—found in wheat, rye, barley, oats, kamut, spelt and triticale—are also very common.

Nutritional experts are also increasingly questioning the benefits of soy because it’s a very common allergy-provoking food, is difficult to digest, and often comes from genetically modified sources. In moderation, fermented, organic, non-GMO soy products—miso, natto, tempeh and tofu—are better tolerated than non-fermented soy products. Serving sizes are an issue as well. Asian cultures tend to use small amounts while westerners overdo it.

People are more familiar with IgE allergies that cause immediate onset reactions, such as those experienced with allergies to peanuts. The symptoms are obvious and directly follow ingestion of the offending food. As such, they are relatively easy to identify and avoid.

Much more common, however, are IgG or delayed onset food allergies. Symptoms from this type of food allergy typically take about 48 hours to show up and may not always trigger a reaction. Thus, it’s difficult to determine what foods caused what symptoms. Paradoxically, people are sometimes most allergic to foods that they like and eat the most.

However, as discussed in Hidden Food Allergies by James Braly, M.D., and Patrick Holford, identifying IgG food allergies is easier with current testing methods. They recommend a quantitative IgG ELISA food allergy test.

Another method of identifying foods that trigger allergies is to use food rotation and elimination techniques as described in How to Control Your Allergies by Robert Forman, Ph.D.; The McDougall Plan by John McDougall, M.D.; or Is This Your Child? by Doris Rapp, M.D.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article…..

Mark Pitstick, B.S., M.A., D.C., has over forty years experience and training in hospitals, pastoral counseling settings, mental health centers, and holistic private practice. His training includes a premedical degree, graduate theology/pastoral counseling studies, masters in clinical psychology, and doctorate in chiropractic. His book Radiant Wellness: A Holistic Guide for Optimal Body, Mind and Spirit was endorsed by Drs. Deepak Chopra, Wayne Dyer, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Bernie Siegel and others. Mark has been a frequent radio and TV guest and hosted a nationally syndicated radio show. He has presented many workshops on holistic health and spiritual awareness. He has been a review editor and regular contributor to many magazines and e-zines. Mark founded the Radiant Wellness Center and the Stressor-Nutrient Balancing healing method.

Disclaimer: Listing improvements of past patients’ problems does not imply a guarantee for those with similar conditions. I do not claim to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. I do teach people and health care professionals how to assist the body in healing itself of imbalances.

Want To Get Rid Of Cellulite?

Share Button

By Sharon Gnatt Epel

womanarmupNow that summer is just around the corner, you may be trying on swimsuits, and wondering what you can do about those dimpled bumps and lumps that have taken residence on your legs and rear end. Cellulite, often referred to as “cottage cheese” skin, is an unattractive visual condition caused by fat cells globbing together in the dermis (the middle layer of the skin), and collectively pulling on the skin’s connective tissue. This creates a dimpled surface, and is most often seen on the derriere, thighs, and back of the legs. Getting rid of cellulite seems to be at the forefront of many women’s summer beauty issues.

While cellulite may be eliminated or greatly reduced through expensive surgical and laser procedures (be aware that traditional liposuction will not correct this condition), there are simple inexpensive things you can do at home to minimize and reduce its appearance, all by yourself!

Here are several suggestions:

• Brush your skin. If you are not familiar with skin brushing, now is a good time to acquaint yourself with this practice. Daily dry brushing with a loofa or natural plant fiber pad can stimulate a stagnant lymphatic system, increase blood flow, slough off dead cells and increase cellular growth and turnover rate. The best time to brush your skin is right before you bathe or shower. Be sure to follow up with a cool rinse to further tone your skin, and moisturize while your skin is still damp with an essential oil blend created specifically for the purpose of reducing cellulite.

• Stop smoking and cut down on your alcohol consumption. Detoxing your body can be enormously helpful to reducing cellulite. A product I like to use is the detox foot pads carried by many health food stores. These pads contain a combination of Chinese herbs and botanicals that help draw out toxins. I apply mine at night, and always feel better the next morning. You will need to wash your feet well afterwards, to get rid of the funky smell that accumulates on the pad, but it is well worth the extra few minutes added to your morning routine.

• Avoid yo-yo dieting. Frequent fluctuations in weight can stress the skin’s connective fibers and aggravate cellulite. Enough said.

• Some dietary supplements are thought to help repair trauma to the skin. Glucosamine is one nutrient that is often used in connection with cellulite treatments. Be sure to check with your naturopath to figure out the proper dosage for your body weight and type.

http://yourhealthjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kickhabit.jpg• Stay away from junk food! This includes processed foods, saturated fats, diet soda, synthetic preservatives and artificial anything. Too much salt or sugar in your diet can cause you to retain fluids in addition to creating a slew of other health-related problems further down the line.

• Embrace a healthy diet that includes plenty of greens, fresh fruit, veggies and organic protein. Try to stay away from produce that has been conventionally grown using toxic agricultural chemicals.

• Increase your water consumption. Drinking clean, filtered water stimulates the body’s metabolic processes and is a natural diuretic. Be sure to drink 2 glasses of water for each glass of caffeinated tea or coffee that you consume, to avoid dehydration.

• Last but not least, get out there and exercise! Exercise stimulates circulation, brain function, burns calories, and releases endorphins that make you feel alert and vibrant!
By incorporating these suggestions into a healthy lifestyle, you can improve your chances for cellulite-free skin, and help prevent the deterioration of your body’s connective tissues as you age.

– Sharon Gnatt Epel is the CEO/Founder, La Isha Natural & Organic Skincare.

Childhood Obesity Hits Home

Share Button

obesegirlvectorexerciseFrom Your Health Journal…..”I wanted to promote an excellent article I found from the LA Times written by Mary McNamara, who does such a great job with this article – – I had to share it. As you know, childhood obesity is on the rise, as 1 in 3 children are now considered overweight in the United States. Along with this, obesity related diseases are also on the rise, which include heart disease, type 2 diabetes, weak joints, cancer, and asthma. Change is needed, and educating families on healthy lifestyle is important. The author of this article (who states she was overweight as a child) states a deluge of cheap junk food, the ubiquity of high fructose corn syrup and other sugars, the absence of physical education in schools, outrageous marketing aimed at children, cost-cutting in school cafeterias — all make it far too easy for children to eat themselves sick. Well said. PLEASE visit the LA Times web site (link provided below) to read the FULL article. Ms. McNamara does such an excellent job educating her readers on this obesity epidemic facing our youth. Support her work!”

From the article…..

Take it from someone who knows: The struggle with childhood obesity, illustrated vividly on television, is a battle of both the mind and the mouth for an overweight kid.

I was a pioneer of childhood obesity.

By the time I was a junior in high school, I weighed more than 200 pounds. I was a fat kid before being a fat kid made you the topic of a national conversation and the first lady’s pet project, back when Gatorade still tasted gross and no one knew how many calories there were in anything.

For most of my childhood, I was the only fat girl in my class — I can still name the other two fat girls in my grade. Now, fat kids fill the playground and the high school bleachers, including a whole new breed of fat girl who wears skin tight jeans and mid-riffs and dares anyone to say anything. Seeing them, I must admit I am torn between despair and envy.

I never expected to see my childhood reflected on television — overweight young characters are still rare even post-“Hairspray” — but there they are, my modern equivalents, on “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” “Too Fat for 15 and Fighting Back” and, most recently, HBO’s multi-pronged documentary “The Weight of the Nation,” all part of a collective attempt to address America’s childhood obesity epidemic.

According to these shows, and many reports in other media, the root system of this crisis is insidious and widespread. A deluge of cheap junk food, the ubiquity of high fructose corn syrup and other sugars, the absence of physical education in schools, outrageous marketing aimed at children, cost-cutting in school cafeterias — all make it far too easy for children to eat themselves sick.

As a former obese child who fights all these forces to remain a normal-sized adult, I applaud every show, every article, every effort. But here is what I know about being a fat kid: It is at least as much about your head as it is about what you put in your mouth. Yes indeed, bad foods are cheaper and more seductive than healthful foods, and we need to call a cease-fire on the endless barrage of junk kids face. But it is also true that fat kids eat differently than non-fat kids, something that is rarely discussed.

To read the complete article…..Click here

97% Of Kids’ Meals Still Unhealthy

Share Button

hamburgervectorFrom Your Health Journal…..”I wanted to promote an excellent article I found written by Barb Berggoetz of The Indianapolis Star entitled 97% of kids’ meals still unhealthy, groups warns. First, the image from the article catches my eye, as it shows back to back to back fast food establishments side by side. As we know, there is an obesity epidemic facing the youth of the world, as well as a rise in obesity related illnesses such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, asthma, weak joints, and heart disease. Some of the major components to a child’s life that contribute to this health issue are the increase of technology usage, reduction of physical activity, and poor diet. Today’s article review is questioning whether are fast-food restaurant kids’ meals getting healthier? A recent study on fast food found 97 percent of the nearly 3,500 meal possibilities did not meet the center’s nutrition criteria for 4- to 8-year-olds. The criteria from this study says kids’ meals cannot exceed 430 calories, more than 35 percent of calories from fat or more than 10 percent of calories from saturated plus trans fat. They cannot have more than 35 percent added sugars nor more than 770 milligrams of sodium. Also, they must provide at least a half serving of fruit or vegetable, including an item that is 51 percent or more whole grain or including specified levels of vitamins or fiber. The criteria exclude sugar drinks, in favor of water, juice or low-fat milk. Please visit the Indy Star’s web site (link provided below) to read this complete article. It was well written and very informative.”

From the article…..

Are fast-food restaurant kids’ meals getting healthier?

Sure, some have added apples or offer milk as a drink option. And with all the attention on childhood obesity and good nutrition, one might think significant changes were under way.

Not so, at least according to a recent survey by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a Washington, D.C.-based non-profit organization focusing on nutrition and food safety.

The group’s report found 97 percent of the nearly 3,500 meal possibilities did not meet the center’s nutrition criteria for 4- to 8-year-olds.

Only slight progress has been made since 2008, when the center last reviewed kids’ meals at chain restaurants. At that time, 99 percent of the meals didn’t meet its standards. In 2008, one-third of chain restaurants had at least one meal that met standards. Now, 44 percent do.

Registered dietitian Heather Fink, though, says it’s up to individuals to make healthier choices.

“It’s a parent’s decision in most cases,” said Fink, owner of Nutrition & Wellness Solutions, a nutrition consulting firm in Fishers. “The parents should be in charge of choosing a healthier option. If you want a healthier meal, just don’t go to fast food restaurants. I wouldn’t expect them to be healthy.”

The criteria say kids’ meals cannot exceed 430 calories, more than 35 percent of calories from fat or more than 10 percent of calories from saturated plus trans fat. They cannot have more than 35 percent added sugars nor more than 770 milligrams of sodium. Also, they must provide at least a half serving of fruit or vegetable, including an item that is 51 percent or more whole grain or including specified levels of vitamins or fiber. The criteria exclude sugar drinks, in favor of water, juice or low-fat milk.

To read the complete article…..Click here