How To Identify Signs Of High Cholesterol And Lower Cholesterol Naturally

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healthywordsAccording to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in every six Americans has high cholesterol. New York Times and USA Today Best Selling author, Sanjay Jain, M.D. MBA explains how to identify signs of high cholesterol and reduce cholesterol levels without the use of expensive medications.

Recent statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention show that 17% of Americans–one out of every six adults–have high levels of cholesterol. While this is a serious condition, affecting millions of people, too many individuals don’t take action and try to lower their cholesterol levels because there are few outward signs and symptoms that easily identify the problem. Sadly, for many people, it’s only after they suffer a heart attack or stroke that they find out that they have high cholesterol. New York Times and USA Today Best Selling author, Sanjay Jain, M.D. MBA has recently published a video on how to identify signs of high cholesterol and reduce cholesterol levels without the use of expensive medications.

WebMD says that some people may notice bumps, from a build up of fat and cholesterol, on their hands, skin or feet. Other than that there are no outward ways to identify high cholesterol. People with certain risk factors, including eating a poor diet, being overweight, being inactive, smoking, taking certain medications, age, having diabetes or a family history of cholesterol, should keep a close eye on their cholesterol levels.

Starting at age 20, Mayo Clinic recommends that adults have their cholesterol checked every five years unless the doctor says otherwise. People who are at a higher risk for elevated cholesterol levels should take measures to lower their LDL (“good”) cholesterol and raise their HDL (“good”) cholesterol.

While many medical professionals advocate the use of prescription medications to lower cholesterol, there are natural options for individuals who prefer to take a more holistic approach to their health. Adjusting one’s diet and lifestyle can go a long way in reducing cholesterol levels or preventing them from getting too high.

Some foods which aid in lowering cholesterol include:

* Avocado and avocado oil– Enjoy chopped avocado pieces on a salad, or stir fry vegetables in avocado oil.

* Dark chocolate– Sprinkle dark cocoa powder on coffee for a guilt-free indulgence.

* Wine– A small glass after dinner assists in lowering LDL levels and provides antioxidants.

* Nuts– Have a handful as a snack, or sprinkle on oatmeal and salads.

* Salmon, Tuna, Halibut– Broil or bake un-breaded fish filets for a wholesome, filling meal with plenty of hearty-healthy fats.

* Apples– Grandma was right; an apple a day can keep the doctor away. Apples, and pears, have pectin which is a type of fiber that assists in lowering cholesterol.

fruits-and-vegetablesFor work lunches, try swapping out low-quality fast food meals for homemade salads and fresh fruit. Walk, and take the stairs, whenever possible to be more active. Buy a fitness DVD to do in the early mornings or evenings to help lose weight. None of these activities require much time or money, but they will all help people live longer, healthier lives and spend less on health care.

To make long term lifestyle changes, it’s important to make the changes gradually. Start with one change a week, adding a new one while maintaining previous ones. It’s only natural to make mistakes and slip-up from time to time; recognize the mistake and jump back on the path to better health. Over time, these changes become second nature.

For more information on this and other topics related to health and wellness please visit Dr. Jain’s website at http://www.sanjayjainmd.com/.

About Dr. Sanjay Jain:

Sanjay Jain, M.D. MBA is a New York Times and USA Today Best Selling author, accomplished medical doctor, health expert, life coach and inspirational keynote speaker who has dedicated his life to helping people find their purpose by achieving a meaningful life that they deeply cherish. Sanjay Jain is U.S. trained and a board certified physician with over 15 years of clinical experience. He holds certifications in Diagnostic Radiology, Integrative Medicine, and Healthcare Quality and Management. He is a graduate from the accelerated BS/MD program at The Northeast Ohio Medical University. He has diversified experience in the private practice, academic, and integrated multispecialty settings.

– Courtesy of PRWeb

Researcher: Chowing Down On Watermelon Could Lower Blood Pressure

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watermelonBe sure to pick up a watermelon — or two — at your neighborhood farmers’ market.

It could save your life.

A new study by Florida State University Associate Professor Arturo Figueroa, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, found that watermelon could significantly reduce blood pressure in overweight individuals both at rest and while under stress.

“The pressure on the aorta and on the heart decreased after consuming watermelon extract,” Figueroa said.

The study started with a simple concept. More people die of heart attacks in cold weather because the stress of the cold temperatures causes blood pressure to increase and the heart has to work harder to pump blood into the aorta. That often leads to less blood flow to the heart.

Thus, people with obesity and high blood pressure face a higher risk for stroke or heart attack when exposed to the cold either during the winter or in rooms with low temperatures.

So, what might help their hearts?

It turned out that watermelon may be part of the answer.

Figueroa’s 12-week study focused on 13 middle-aged, obese men and women who also suffered from high blood pressure. To simulate cold weather conditions, one hand of the subject was dipped into 39 degree water (or 4 degrees Celsius) while Figueroa’s team took their blood pressure and other vital measurements.

Meanwhile, the group was divided into two. For the first six weeks, one group was given four grams of the amino acid L-citrulline and two grams of L-arginine per day, both from watermelon extract. The other group was given a placebo for 6 weeks.

Then, they switched for the second six weeks.

Participants also had to refrain from taking any medication for blood pressure or making any significant changes in their lifestyle, particularly related to diet and exercise, during the study.

The results showed that consuming watermelon had a positive impact on aortic blood pressure and other vascular parameters.

Notably, study participants showed improvements in blood pressure and cardiac stress while both at rest and while they were exposed to the cold water.

“That means less overload to the heart, so the heart is going to work easily during a stressful situation such as cold exposure,” Figueroa said.

Figueroa has conducted multiple studies on the benefits of watermelon. In the past, he examined how it impacts post-menopausal women’s arterial function and the blood pressure readings of adults with pre-hypertension.

– Submitted by Florida State University News

8 Foods You Can Eat to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

bloodpressureEver felt like you wanted to eat healthier but didn’t quite know where to start or you keep putting it off for another time? Stop right there. You don’t have to delay another day. Start eating these eight food and you’ll be on your way to a healthier heart and lower blood pressure.

1) Enjoy an orange a day. Oranges, tangerines, tangelos and grapefruit can give you a healthy, fat-free, salt-free boost anytime during the day.

2) Bake a potato or a sweet potato for potassium, which helps balance sodium. (Skip the butter and use a small amount of butter substitute or top with non-fat yogurt and herbs.)

3) Bananas provide potassium and fiber and also fill you up, fast.

4) Salmon. You receive great benefits of omega-3 fatty acids when you have this fish 3 times a week.

5) Drink skim milk. You add the multiple benefits of protein, carbohydrates, calcium and potassium.

6) Use herbs and spices like pepper, garlic, oregano, parsley, cilantro, cumin, turmeric, to flavor your meals instead of salt and butter.

greenpeas7) Add spinach, beans, broccoli, cauliflower and tomatoes to your meals for added vitamins, minerals and fiber.

8) Dark chocolate! (Just when you were thinking ,”What about dessert?”) Choose a chocolate that is 45-80% cacao and eat one square a day for the benefits of antioxidants and blood vessel relaxation. Choose one with nuts and maybe you bump your quota to two squares!

Nothing has to get in the way of your heart health. Don’t postpone lowering your blood pressure. Follow these 8 tips and let your best health begin today.

– Kac Young , a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author 10 books. Heart Easy™ is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding. While earning her PhD in Natural Health and a Doctorate in Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University. Learn more about your heart health at: www.HeartEasy.com

Vitamin D May Lower Diabetes Risk In Obese Children And Adolescents

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obeseboyvectorbellyFrom Your Health Journal…..”Another interesting article from Science Daily that I wanted to promote entitled Vitamin D May Lower Diabetes Risk In Obese Children And Adolescents. We discuss here on a regular basis the obesity epidemic facing the youth of the world, as well as the increase of obesity related illness such as heart disease, weak joints, asthma, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. We know that children today have become very sedentary, where technology is consuming their lives, to a point where physical activity is minimal. Parents are always looking for solutions – quick ones! But, as we know, there are NO quick solutions to fighting obesity. A well-rounded healthy lifestyle is the best defense to keep the weight off children – including eating properly, exercise, sleep, and proper hydration. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease. The study suggested that by increasing vitamin D intake alone was nearly as powerful as what has been seen using a prescription drug. These are interesting findings, which needs more research, but nevertheless, very interesting. Remember, this does not take away the importance of proper exercise and diet, but important. Please visit the Science Daily web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

Childhood and adolescent obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically in the past three decades. Being obese puts individuals at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease in which individuals have too much sugar in their blood. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease.

“By increasing vitamin D intake alone, we got a response that was nearly as powerful as what we have seen using a prescription drug,” said Catherine Peterson, an associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at MU. “We saw a decrease in insulin levels, which means better glucose control, despite no changes in body weight, dietary intake or physical activity.”

Peterson and her colleagues studied 35 pre-diabetic obese children and adolescents who were undergoing treatment in the MU Adolescent Diabetic Obesity Program. All of those in the study had insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels and had similar diets and activity levels. Study participants randomly were assigned either a high-dose vitamin D supplement or a placebo that they took daily for six months. Those who took the supplement became vitamin D sufficient and lowered the amount of insulin in their blood.

“The vitamin D dosage we gave to the obese adolescents in our study is not something I would recommend for everyone,” Peterson said. “For clinicians, the main message from this research is to check the vitamin D status of their obese patients, because they’re likely to have insufficient amounts. Adding vitamin D supplements to their diets may be an effective addition to treating obesity and its associated insulin resistance.”

Vitamin D helps maintain healthy bones, muscles and nerves and enters bodies through sunlight exposure, diet or supplements. Vitamin D insufficiency is common; however, it can be more detrimental to those who are obese, Peterson said.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Babies Of Obese Moms Show Lower Vitamin D Levels

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babyFrom Your Health Journal…..”An interesting article recently in the Chicago Tribune written by Jessica Tobacman entitled Babies Of Obese Moms Show Lower Vitamin D Levels. Recently, a new study found babies born to women who are obese at the start of pregnancy tend to have one-third less vitamin D than the infants of lean women. Vitamin D is very important to young babies as it helps build stronger bones. The study found that obese and lean pregnant moms had the same levels of Vitamin D, but the babies did not, as the babies born to lean mothers had higher levels of Vitamin D. This is a very well written and fascinating article, as it supports the fact that reducing obesity not only helps a person live healthier, but now, it helps their children. Please visit the Chicago Tribune web site (link provided below) to support Ms. Tobacman’s article.”

From the article…..

Babies born to women who are obese at the start of pregnancy tend to have one-third less vitamin D than the infants of lean women, according to a new study led by a Northwestern Medicine professor.

Vitamin D is important for children because it helps to build strong bones, doctors say.

Dr. Jami L. Josefson and her team measured the vitamin D levels of 61 pregnant women two to four weeks before giving birth at Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago. Before pregnancy, the women’s body-mass indexes ranged from obese to normal.

Just after birth, the umbilical cord blood was collected from the babies. For those with mothers who were obese, the blood contained lower levels of the vitamin.

The difference in babies’ vitamin D levels occurred despite the fact that the mothers had similar levels of the vitamin in their bodies before giving birth, said Josefson, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Northwestern and an attending physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

“We were surprised that obese and lean women had similar levels of vitamin D. It made the analysis and the results more scientifically interesting to look at because the moms’ levels were similar,” she said.

The different levels in the infants could be attributed to the way that the body treats vitamin D, Josefson said.

“It’s a very accepted finding in the literature that obese people sequester vitamin D in fat tissue, which (means) it is not as available for the body. Vitamin D is carried in fat cells,” Josefson said.

The study, titled “Maternal Obesity and Vitamin D Sufficiency Are Associated with Cord Blood Vitamin D Insufficiency,” was published last month in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. The research is part of a larger project investigating whether body fat in later childhood and adulthood can be predicted somewhat by body fat at birth.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Living At Higher Altitudes Tied To Lower Obesity Risk

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scaleFrom Your Health Journal…..A great article by Reuters that discusses how Living At Higher Altitudes Is Tied To Lower Obesity Risk. According to a new study, people in the United States who live at higher altitudes where the air is thinnest are less likely to be obese than those in low-lying areas. People who lived closest to sea level were four to five times more likely to be obese, compared to people who live well above sea level. Can you see it now, everyone is packing up their bags and moving to the higher altitudes – well, maybe not, but it is interesting news. The researchers found that adults living in the lowest altitude range had a Body Mass Index (BMI) – a measure of weight against height – of 26.6. That compared to a BMI of 24.2 for people who lived in the highest altitude range. Although they have not pinpointed the reason why, it will be interesting to see what they find out in the future on this topic. Please visit the Reuters web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

People in the United States who live at higher altitudes where the air is thinnest are less likely to be obese than those in low-lying areas, according to a U.S. study.

Using data for more than 400,000 people, researchers who published their results in the International Journal of Obesity found that people who lived closest to sea level were four to five times more likely to be obese, compared to people who live well above sea level in Colorado.

“I was surprised by the magnitude of the effect,” said lead author Jameson Voss, from Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. “I wasn’t expecting such a consistent pattern as what was emerging.”

About 36 percent of U.S. adults are obese, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Rates vary across the nation, however, with a higher percentage of obese adults in southern states. Western states, such as Nevada and Colorado, report the fewest obese adults.

The reasons behind the difference are unclear, said Voss and his colleagues, but one possible explanation is differences in elevation – which can affect appetite hormones, growth and how many calories the body burns.

For the study, the researchers combined information from several databases, including a telephone health survey of 422,603 U.S. residents from 2011.

They had information on 236 people who lived at the highest altitude of at least 3,000 meters (about 9,800 feet) above sea level. They all lived in Colorado and tended to smoke less, eat healthier and exercise more.

The researchers also had information on 322,681 people who lived in the lowest altitude range, or less than 500 m (about 1,600 feet) above sea level.

To read the full article…..Click here

Lower The Risk Of Developing Heart Disease

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bellymeasurementsmallFrom Your Health Journal…..”A great article recently from Smart Business called How to lower the risk of developing heart disease. The are many causes for heart disease which include sedentary lifestyles, smoking, obesity, and consuming saturated and trans fats, but there is hope is sight for the more than one millions Americans diagnosed each year with the disease. There are ways to reduce the risk of heart disease such as lowering cholesterol and treating high blood pressure. It’s important to maintain an appropriate weight, eat foods low in cholesterol and fat, reduce stress, control blood pressure, exercise frequently, access appropriate screenings and follow your doctor’s advice. Please visit the Smart Business web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It is well written and very informative.”

From the article…..

For more than 1 million Americans annually diagnosed with heart disease, there’s great hope. Two-thirds survive the disease— 27 percent higher than a decade ago, and impressive new technologies and techniques show tremendous promise.

Smart Business turned to nationally prominent experts Gregory S. Thomas, MD, MPH, Medical Director, MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute at Long Beach Memorial and Shaun Setty, MD, Medical Director, Pediatric & Adult Congenital Heart Program at Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach. The two hospitals share one campus, ensuring those facing heart disease can easily access a lifetime of world-class, comprehensive and coordinated services.

What risk factors are most prevalent?

Sedentary lifestyles, smoking, obesity, and consuming saturated and trans fats — prevalent in our society — negatively impact cholesterol counts and blood pressure levels and can cause dangerous plaque build-up in coronary arteries. One in three California children is overweight, many mirroring their parents’ unhealthy habits. This increases heart disease risks as adults, making family fitness and healthy eating essential.

Almost one in 100 babies are born with congenital heart disease. These abnormalities in cardiovascular structures may produce symptoms at birth, during childhood or as adults. While most defects are simple conditions or need no treatment, some require medical attention soon after birth and monitoring throughout adulthood.

How can health risks be lowered?

Lowering cholesterol and treating high blood pressure can reduce risks of dying of heart disease or needing invasive procedures. It’s important to maintain an appropriate weight, eat foods low in cholesterol and fat, reduce stress, control blood pressure, exercise frequently, access appropriate screenings and follow your doctor’s advice.

To read the full article…..Click here