Adults At Risk For Diabetes Double Activity Levels

Share Button

This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the University of Pittsburgh, please share your comments below…..

diabeteswordUniversity of Pittsburgh Public Health program increases physical activity in people at risk for diabetes — but season matters, according to new research.

Adults at risk for type 2 diabetes or heart disease or both can substantially increase their physical activity levels through participating in a lifestyle intervention program developed at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health for use in community-settings, such as senior centers or worksites.

Previous studies have demonstrated that such programs decrease weight and reduce diabetes risk, but this National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded evaluation is one of the first to document that these programs also result in significant increases in the participants’ physical activity levels. The results are reported in this month’s issue of the Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, coinciding with the organization’s 62nd annual meeting in Boston, the largest sports medicine and exercise meeting in the world.

The analysis also confirmed that season matters, with participants getting more physical activity in the summer, versus winter, months. “This may seem like an obvious finding, but this evidence that season influences the physical activity levels of participants in community-based lifestyle interventions will allow us to adjust these programs accordingly and offer extra encouragement and strategies to continue striving to meet physical activity goals during the winter,” said lead author Yvonne L. Eaglehouse, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher at Pitt Public Health.

Dr. Eaglehouse and her colleagues investigated the impact of the Group Lifestyle Balance program, modified from the lifestyle intervention program used in the highly successful U.S. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). The DPP was a national study which demonstrated that people at risk for diabetes who lost a modest amount of weight and sharply increased their physical activity levels reduced their chances of developing diabetes or metabolic syndrome, and outperformed people who took a diabetes drug instead.

diabetesglucoseGroup Lifestyle Balance is a 22-session program administered over a one-year period aimed at helping people make lifestyle changes to lower their risk for diabetes and heart disease. The goals of the program are to help participants reduce their weight by 7 percent and increase their moderate intensity physical activity (such as brisk walking) to a minimum of 150 minutes per week.

As part of the Pitt community intervention effort, a total of 223 participants were enrolled to test the effectiveness of the Group Lifestyle Balance program at a worksite and three diverse community centers in the Pittsburgh area. The participants averaged 58 years of age and had pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome or both.

Participants were surveyed to determine the amount of leisure physical activity they achieved each week. As a result of participating in the program, participants added an average of 45 to 52 minutes of moderate intensity activity similar to a brisk walk to their weekly routine, which was maintained after the program ended at one year.

“This is one of the few programs of its kind to report on physical activity-related outcomes in a large group and the only known diabetes prevention healthy lifestyle program to examine the effect of season and weather on changes in physical activity levels,” said senior author Andrea Kriska, Ph.D., professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology and principal investigator of the NIH study. “Since increased physical activity is one of the primary targets of these programs, it is critical to know if it is working and what can be done to improve the chances that participants reach their goals.”

Additional authors on this research are Bonny J. Rockette-Wagner, Ph.D., Mary Kaye Kramer, Dr.P.H., R.N., Vincent C. Arena, Ph.D., Rachel G. Miller, M.S., and Karl K. Vanderwood, Ph.D., M.P.H., all of Pitt.

This study was funded by NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases grant R18 DK081323-04.

Factors That Boost Blood Glucose Levels Besides Food

Share Button

By Jeremy Lim

diabeteswordIf you have high blood sugar, you absolutely must alter your diet to manage the disease. It’s not optional. Sadly, many diabetics are non-compliant and choose to eat whatever they wish, to the detriment of their own health. It doesn’t have to be this way, though. If you care about your life, stick to your prescribed diet. But, also consider making these important lifestyle changes.

Watch Medications

Some medications can negatively affect your blood sugar, so make sure you’re telling your doctor everything about your medical history and any drugs you’re taking. Even if you don’t think your drug has the side-effects that would account for odd glucose readings, mention it anyway. Some side-effects aren’t common, so they’re not listed as prominently.

Take It Easy With Caffeine

Caffeine affects diabetics differently than non-diabetics. And, even within the community of diabetics, not everyone reacts the same to it. Caffeine can raise blood sugar in some, especially if you tend to put sugar in your coffee. In others, it lowers blood sugar. When in doubt, test your blood. It will tell you everything you need to know.

Exercise

Exercise is almost universally beneficial for diabetics, helping them to stabilize their blood sugar levels. In general, exercise will lower blood sugar, but you should always test before and after a workout, and watch the amount of insulin you take prior to heavy weightlifting or aerobics. Speaking of which, you should include both aerobics and weight-bearing activities in your exercise routine.

Illness Affect Blood Sugar Too

Getting sick can throw off normal blood sugar readings. Generally, illness raises blood sugar levels, but not always. So, don’t go pumping yourself full of insulin. Always check first and confirm. And, every illness can bring different blood sugar readings.

Stress

womanIt shouldn’t be a surprise that stress can negatively affect blood sugar levels. Both physical and emotional stress can influence blood sugar. It can go in either direction, but that direction is usually up.

Reducing stress can also help keep your blood sugar under control, so try to find outlets for stress if you live a hectic lifestyle. Even going to a day spa once a month, getting regular massages, and chilling out with an epsom salt bath a few times a week can really help you manage your stress levels.

An infrared heat lamp can also be very calming, as can infrared saunas, hot tubs, and even regular sunbathing. Or, doing something as simple as reading or playing video games could do the trick. Experiment with different methods and find out what works best for you.

Obesity

It’s more difficult to control your weight when you have diabetes. However, you should do everything you can to maintain a normal weight because excess body fat contributes to high or hard-to-control blood sugar levels. Usually, dietary changes will include maintaining a low-carb diet, while exercising should consist of both weight-bearing and aerobic fitness.

– Jeremy Lim has been involved in the family health field for some time now. When he gets some free time, he likes to sit down and write about his experiences in an effort to help others. For more information on blood glucose levels view the glucometer at OneTouch.

Fact Or Myth: Sleep Apnea Linked To Low Testosterone Levels In Men?

Share Button

By Dr. Michael Layton (DDS)

mansmileIs there a link between sleep apnea and low testosterone levels in men? Health.com recently posted the connection between the two in their 13 Surprising Facts About Testosterone. How valid is this? Let’s examine the facts and nothing but the facts to determine the implications of sleep apnea on testosterone.

What Is Sleep Apnea?

Lawrence Epstein, M.D. of Harvard Medical School and the editor of Harvard Health Publications special health report defines sleep apnea as “a collapse of the upper airway during sleep that is due to the size of the airway and the changes that happen when you fall asleep. The airway is a flexible tube where air passes through the mouth or nose. When you fall asleep the tissue surrounding the breathing tube narrows a little bit. When it closes halfway thats when you start to get an obstruction to airflow which causes very turbulent airflow, resulting in the tissues to vibrate and thats snoring. When the airway completely closes off thats apnea.”

The closing off the airway triggers the brain of the individual to wake up, sleep apnea sufferers can have their sleep interrupted from 25 to 50 times per hour. Sleep apnea is chronic condition affecting 858,900 Canadians who are 18 years and older. Statistics for people who suffer from this sleep disorder reported being diagnosed with the more serious obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This more severe form affects 26 percent of Canadians or 1 in four adults. These statistics can be found at the Public Health Agency of Canada from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey provisioned through Stats Canada.

Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

mansleepingatdeskSleep apnea is more common in males than in females.

Symptoms are as follows:

● interruption of sleep

● shortness of breath

● loud snoring

● waking up with a dry or sore throat

● headaches

● constant reawakening

● decreased interest in sex

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs commonly in people who suffer from obesity, diabetes, heart attacks and strokes, if left untreated it will only exacerbate these preconditions. Extreme fatigue that results from waking up multiple times in a night leads to depression, driving accidents and workplace hazards. When your mother told you to go to bed early when you were a child she may have known a thing or 2 unbeknownst to her about natural health. A good night’s sleep can not be underestimated for your overall health.

What Is Testosterone?

Testosterone is produced in the testes it is the secondary sex characteristic responsible for the reproductive development of the male gender. This male sex hormone is commonly associated with sexual desire and the production of sperm. The three main types of testosterone classification are as follows:

1. Free Testosterone. Total testosterone the purest form found in the human body with no proteins attached to it. This testosterone makes up 2 to 3 percent of total testosterone levels in the human body. Free testosterone is really important for bodybuilders and athletes in sports.

2. SHBG-bound Testosterone. SHBG is bound with the sex hormone globulin. It can not be used to build muscles or change a persons mood. SHBG makes up 40 to 50 percent of our total testosterone levels.

3. Albumin bound Testosterone. Albumin is a protein found in the liver that helps stabilize extracellular fluid in the body. Just like SHBG Albumin is biologically inactive.

Testosterone governs the following factors:

● Skin-Hair growth, balding, sebum production

● Brain-Libido, mood

● Liver-Synthesis of serum proteins

● Male Sexual Growth-penile growth, spermatogenesis, prostate growth and function

● Muscle development-increase in strength and size

● Kidney-stimulation of erythropoietin production

● Bone marrow- stimulation of stem cells

● Bone-accelerated linear growth

manphoneTestosterone affects your level of focus, bone density and last but not least the size of your muscles. Most people associate testosterone with bodybuilders and aggression in athletes especially football players, boxers and MMA fighters. Most of the testosterone in the human body gets bound by the sex hormone binding agent globulin that grabs the testerone preventing its over release, there is another protein amylin also grabs the testerone for when its slowly needed as required. The globulin protein increases as men age leading to decreased levels of testosterone.

Symptoms of Low Testosterone

● erectile disfunction

● lack of sex drive

● lack of focus and ambition

● obesity

● decreased muscle mass

● bone density decrease

● abnormal male breast tissue

● low sperm count

● loss of body hair

● mild anemia

● decreased energy and depression

Low levels of testosterone in men can lead to an increased risk of chronic conditions like diabetes or hypertension or even death in some cases.

Linking Sleep Apnea and Low Testosterone

doctorAny physician out there will acknowledge there is a direct link between aging and a decrease in testosterone levels and higher incidences of sleep apnea. Testosterone deficiency or hypogonadism is prevalent among obese people. If noticed during this article there are many common symptoms related to men who have low levels of testosterone and people who have sleep apnea. All evidence points to a definite correlation for men who have sleep apnea and decreased levels of the male hormone testosterone.

Medical doctors recommend getting blood work done if your energy levels are low or getting a polysomnogram for possible sleep apnea. Low levels of testosterone are linked to low levels of insulin production making people susceptible to Type II Diabetes. Obesity is a common denominator in people who have diabetes. Individuals who are diabetic are at an increased risk for sleep apnea. Medical studies have drawn too many parallels between sleep apnea and low testosterone levels in men for this issue to be ignored.

If you are a male who is experiencing any of the symptoms outlined you many want to consult with your physician on your next checkup.

– Dr. Michael Layton (DDS) is a South Surrey Dentist, based in British Columbia. He has been in the dental industry for the last decade and received his Doctor of Dental Surgery from the University of Washington. He takes pride in providing a positive and caring dental solutions for people of every walk of life. You can follow him on Google+.

Long Term Chiropractic Patients Have Higher Blood Levels Of DNA Repair Chemicals

Share Button

By Dr. Kevin Kita

dnaThe February 18, 2005 issue of the Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research finds that patients under long-term chiropractic care have higher levels of the blood chemicals associated with effective DNA repair and overall wellness.

The test was a retrospective analysis of 46 patients, all over the age of 40 who had been under short- term chiropractic care for 8-52 weeks or long term wellness care for 52-312 weeks. Researchers assessed the levels of serum thiols, blood factors that have been found to help the body repair the damaging effects stress has on the structure of DNA. Serum thiols are measured in terms of nM cysteine.

The authors found that non-chiropractic treated patients in the control group had serum thiol levels of 124 nM cysteine. Patients with active disease processes going on generally had levels below 90 compared to patients under long-term chiropractic care who had values of 146.

In their conclusion, the authors say, “some final observations should be noted. The results clearly support the recommendations being made for wellness care by chiropractors. In addition, it should be stated that these results occurred under normal practice conditions and indicate what most chiropractors are likely achieving when performing long-term care. Also, it refutes earlier that five to seven years of care was necessary to optimize human health status, as indicated by serum thiol levels. Our sampling indicates that this can occur in a time frame approximately half that period. Finally, there is no doubt that chiropractic care was the dominant factor in being able to realize thiol values that in some cases have not been seen in nutriceutical testing, the only other intervention shown to improve thiol values.”

Long term chiropractic patients have higher blood levels of DNA repair chemicals.

(2005). In Touch, 9,1.

– Dr. Kevin Kita, Chiropractor, Author, International Speaker, and Radio Host.

Dr. Kita is well known among his patients for his compassion, wisdom, astonishing intuition, gentle and caring demeanor, and non-invasive chiropractic technique. He is a 1997 graduate of the Sherman Chiropractic College and has been practicing Chiropractic in the Yardley/Morrisville area for the past 15 years.

Dr. Kita was an international speaker and teacher for the Koren Specific Technique and has been featured on numerous television and radio shows for health related issues, Chiropractic, and for his book Healing Journeys Stories of Mind, Body, and Spirit. He was the Chiropractor for the Trenton Shooting Stars professional basketball team. Dr. Kita was also the publisher for an internationally recognized Chiropractic newsletter and has spoken to many companies and groups regarding the benefits of Chiropractic care.

Dr. Kita is on the board of the Ivins Outreach Center and is involved in many other local charities. He is considered the Chiropractor’s Chiropractor because there are many Chiropractors that seek him out for care and professional advice.

Babies Of Obese Moms Show Lower Vitamin D Levels

Share Button

babyFrom Your Health Journal…..”An interesting article recently in the Chicago Tribune written by Jessica Tobacman entitled Babies Of Obese Moms Show Lower Vitamin D Levels. Recently, a new study found babies born to women who are obese at the start of pregnancy tend to have one-third less vitamin D than the infants of lean women. Vitamin D is very important to young babies as it helps build stronger bones. The study found that obese and lean pregnant moms had the same levels of Vitamin D, but the babies did not, as the babies born to lean mothers had higher levels of Vitamin D. This is a very well written and fascinating article, as it supports the fact that reducing obesity not only helps a person live healthier, but now, it helps their children. Please visit the Chicago Tribune web site (link provided below) to support Ms. Tobacman’s article.”

From the article…..

Babies born to women who are obese at the start of pregnancy tend to have one-third less vitamin D than the infants of lean women, according to a new study led by a Northwestern Medicine professor.

Vitamin D is important for children because it helps to build strong bones, doctors say.

Dr. Jami L. Josefson and her team measured the vitamin D levels of 61 pregnant women two to four weeks before giving birth at Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago. Before pregnancy, the women’s body-mass indexes ranged from obese to normal.

Just after birth, the umbilical cord blood was collected from the babies. For those with mothers who were obese, the blood contained lower levels of the vitamin.

The difference in babies’ vitamin D levels occurred despite the fact that the mothers had similar levels of the vitamin in their bodies before giving birth, said Josefson, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Northwestern and an attending physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

“We were surprised that obese and lean women had similar levels of vitamin D. It made the analysis and the results more scientifically interesting to look at because the moms’ levels were similar,” she said.

The different levels in the infants could be attributed to the way that the body treats vitamin D, Josefson said.

“It’s a very accepted finding in the literature that obese people sequester vitamin D in fat tissue, which (means) it is not as available for the body. Vitamin D is carried in fat cells,” Josefson said.

The study, titled “Maternal Obesity and Vitamin D Sufficiency Are Associated with Cord Blood Vitamin D Insufficiency,” was published last month in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. The research is part of a larger project investigating whether body fat in later childhood and adulthood can be predicted somewhat by body fat at birth.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Obesity Must Be Addressed On Multiple Levels

Share Button

losingweightFrom Your Health Journal…..”An interesting article from Seattle PI by Timi Gustafson entitled Obesity Must Be Addressed On Multiple Levels. Obesity is a major concern in the United States, as so many Americans suffer from obesity related illness such as heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and weak joints. Over two thirds of Americans now struggle with weight problems, and there is no consensus among the experts over the precise causes. Simple changes in life can get people on the right path such as making exercise part of their daily routine, eat nutritiously, get plenty of sleep, hydrate properly, and eat smaller portions. I encourage you to visit the Seattle PI web site and support Timi Gustafson’s article – it is very interesting and well written.”

From the article…..

Obesity has grown into an alarming public health crisis, and there is no telling when or even whether we will be able to get this epidemic under control. Over two thirds of Americans now struggle with weight problems, and there is no consensus among the experts over the precise causes. Recommendations for countermeasures range from calls for more government involvement to greater responses from food manufacturers and restaurant operators to better health education of the public.

Recent legislation for the improvement of nutrition standards of school lunches and initiatives like “Let’s Move” to reduce childhood obesity have gotten some traction, but progress remains slow and uncertain, according to the latest report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Overall, there is no significant change in the current trends, and so the battle for America’s health continues unabated. There is general agreement that more, much more needs to be done.

Demands for tougher regulation of industry and policies to influence the behavior of consumers have become louder in recent years, but we have not seen the results we had hoped for. In a recent op-ed article, New York Times columnist Mark Bittman has faulted the current Surgeon General, Dr. Regina Benjamin, for being “missing in action” in the fight against obesity, especially childhood obesity. On this issue, he writes, “Benjamin, like most of her predecessors, is virtually invisible.” Even with regards to seemingly straight forward measures like curbing children’s exposure to junk food via advertisements on TV or banning soda sales from school campuses, the government remains inexplicably passive. Instead, it still lays most of the blame at the feet of the victims by overemphasizing personal accountability.

Voluntary commitments by food manufacturers and restaurant operators have not produced much success either, despite of ample promises to show more cooperation by making food labels less confusing, offering healthier alternatives on fast food menus, or limiting exposure of kids to food advertisements.

But there is another aspect to this discussion that is often neglected. It is people’s real life experience that is not taken enough into account. By this I don’t mean to lend credence to oversimplifying statements that people are responsible for their own actions and should not blame others for their demise. Those who read my columns and blog posts know very well that I am a strong supporter of many of the measures Mr. Bittman and others are proposing.

To read the full article…..Click here