5 Ways To Control Calorie Intake At Holiday Parties

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By Helen Agresti

salads1. Be a smarty before you party. When we go all day without eating or skip lunch prior to a party, this usually leads to unhealthy choices throughout the remainder of the day. Make time for a cup of soup, small salad with vegetables and black beans or a few whole grain pita slices with hummus.

2. Choose foods with power! Foods that contain a high content of protein, fiber and water (fish, lean meats, beans, whole grains, fruits and vegetables) have the highest satiating power. Simple carbohydrates and high fat foods (cookies, cakes, breads, and cheeses) have a lesser effect on our sense of “fullness.”

3. Give yourself 20. Practice good portion control by waiting 20 minutes in between visits to the buffet table. This gives our bodies time to recognize the satiating power of the food we just ingested.

4. Hydrate and deflate. Beer, wine, and sugar-laden drinks are high in calories and have zero nutritional value. Naturally, the more we drink the more we visit the restroom. For every alcoholic beverage, drink one glass of water. Staying hydrated will decrease the likelihood of headaches, fatigue, and feeling bloated the next day.

5. Do yourself a favor and enjoy the flavors. Socialize away from the food. Mindless eating often occurs when we’re engaged in conversion and food is close at hand. Always eat sitting down and enjoy your holiday meal.

~ Healthy and Happy Holiday Eating!

– Helen Agresti is a Registered Dietitian with Professional Nutrition Consulting, LLC. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and 5 children. For more Nutrition advice and healthy recipes follow her on twitter @HelenAgresti and on the web www.pronutritionconsulting.com

Global Sugar Intake Behind The Rise In Type 2 Diabetes

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diabeteswordFrom Your Health Journal…..A great article in one of my favorite web sites to promote called Red Orbit, written by Lawrence LeBlond. The article is entitled Global Sugar Intake Behind The Rise In Type 2 Diabetes. Obesity is on the rise all over the world, and one health risk factor associated with obesity is type 2 diabetes, which in many cases, is environmental – sometimes reversible with weight loss. Believe it or not, more than 350 million people around the glboe are believed to have diabetes, and for years health experts have debated on what the exact driver of the illness has been. While sugar intake has been viewed as a culprit in many eyes, scientists have long refuted that conjecture and attributed the global health crisis to too much overall food intake and obesity. Recently, a new study suggests through compelling evidence that Type 2 diabetes is being largely driven by the rising consumption of sugary foods and drinks. Please visit the Red Orbit web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

More than 350 million people worldwide are believed to have diabetes, and for years health experts have debated on what the exact driver of the illness has been. While sugar intake has been viewed as a culprit in many eyes, scientists have long refuted that conjecture and attributed the global health crisis to too much overall food intake and obesity.

But in a new finding by three California universities – Stanford, UC-Berkeley and UCSF – suggests through compelling evidence that Type 2 diabetes is being largely driven by the rising consumption of sugary foods and drinks. This evidence comes in the form of large-scale analysis of worldwide sugar availability over the last decade. The findings have been published in Wednesday’s (Feb. 27) issue of the journal PLoS ONE.

In all, the American researchers looked at sugar intake in 175 countries, including the United States. They found increases in sugar intake account for a third of all new cases of diabetes in the US and a quarter of all cases worldwide. In the countries studied, the researchers found an average 150-calorie-per-day increase in the availability of sugar – roughly the equivalent of a can of cola. This accounts for a rise in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes by 1.1 percent.

The team also found that, in the countries studied, an increase of 150-calories-per-day for all food, regardless of sugar content, only led to a 0.1 percent rise in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, adding credence to the evidence that sugar intake is a prominent driver for onset of diabetes.

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The study’s lead author, Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, said the finding was “quite a surprise.”

“We’re not diminishing the importance of obesity at all, but these data suggest that at a population level there are additional factors that contribute to diabetes risk besides obesity and total calorie intake, and that sugar appears to play a prominent role,” Basu said.

While the study cannot prove that sugar alone is causing diabetes, it does confirm that the longer a population is exposed to excess sugar, the higher its diabetes rate will be after taking obesity and other factors into account. The study also found that diabetes rates waned over time when sugar availability dropped, independent of changes in consumption of other calories.

To read the full article…..Click here

Healthy Liquid Intake For Children

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By Dr. Adeyemi Fatoki, M.D.

sodabottleThere is really no difference between 100 percent fruit juice, sports drinks, soda or fruit drinks. They all contain excessive amounts of sugar and are not a substitute for fruit. In the same manner, vegetable juice is not a substitute for eating real vegetables. Juices are processed and contain ingredients that are not naturally found in natural fruits or vegetables.

Whole milk is much healthier than low fat milk. Low fat milk is processed from whole milk and is a known cause of elevated triglycerides (a form of bad cholesterol) and HDL (good cholesterol). Sugar will cause the same dysfunction in the body. Typically, foods that are labeled “low fat” contain more sodium and/or sugar.

The true cause of obesity and obesity related disorders is processed foods. These are man-made foods that the body was never designed to use. As much as fat in the diet has been blamed and reduced, we continue to see an increase in obesity and obesity related disorders. I am yet to treat a patient who craves or eat fat or one who drinks oil regularly. Fats are not palatable unless they are combined with sugar or salt. For us to improve the health of our children and save the future generation, we need to curtail the manufacture and consumption of processed food.

– Dr. Adeyemi Fatoki, M.D., is a Bariatrician, Author, & Medical Director of Great Heights Family Medicine in Calumet City and Ottawa, IL and co-founder of Practical Health Technology Solutions.

Copyright 2012 Adeyemi Fatoki, MD. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.