How To Keep Your Medical Practice Free Of Infectious Pathogens

Share Button

By Veselina Dzhingarova

didyouknow?Maintain a state of the art waiting area for your patients featuring chairs with non-porous surfaces and plenty of trash receptacles to keep your office cleaner. Instruct your workers to wipe down all areas with antibacterial wipes to help prevent germs from replicating and spreading to other areas. Unfortunately, some illnesses spread quickly, even in the cleanest of medical facilities. Working with an infection control consultant will aid you in identifying potential hazards within your workplace as well as managing outbreaks before they become detrimental to your business. Remember that hiring a team of healthcare professionals who know how to treat patients is one thing but keeping your medical practice free of pathogens requires a different type of expert.

Analyzing the Risk of an Outbreak

Your medical practice may have signs posted to help inform patients and staff of their duty to clean up after themselves, but it only takes one person being infected for an outbreak to emerge. Consider how quickly pathogens can spread after someone uses the facilities and fails to wash their hands. Those germs can be spread to the furniture and even your examination rooms over the course of just one or two hours. Infection control consultants can help you in identifying how bad a potential outbreak would be at your medical facility given your current practices. That information can also be used to prevent future contamination and the spread of dangerous pathogens.

Preventing Contamination

Installing equipment such as touch-less paper towel dispensers and toilets that automatically flush could be the key to stopping contaminants from being spread at your medical facilities. The suggestions that are given to you by an infection control consultant will be personalized and based on the size and specific structure of your practice. Medical facilities that are used to treat and care for pregnant women or the elderly, for example, may be urged to take additional precautions as the people they serve are more at risk.

Monitoring the Cleanliness of Your Facilities

After getting an assessment, you will need to have your facility checked to ensure that there is little risk of a serious outbreak. Cultures may be taken from various surfaces to check for pathogens and your staff may even be surveyed on the level of cleanliness at your business. Whether assessments are continuous or infrequent, it is vital that your medical facility is looked after by someone who specializes in infectious disease risk factors. One particularly bad flu season could lead to an outbreak in your practice, sickening your staff and causing you to temporarily shut down. Whenever you have questions about pathogens and infectious diseases you should go to a consulting firm that can give you specialized advice.

No amount of hand sanitizer is going to rid your medical facilities of all germs and pathogens, but you can still keep the risk of outbreak very low. Keep up to date on the spread of diseases in your region so that you can act fast before a crisis develops. Most importantly, maintain good cleaning habits that are streamlined to work with your particular medical specialty.

National Foundation For Infectious Diseases Supports 2014 National Influenza Vaccination Week

Share Button

This article is brought to you by PRWeb, what are your thoughts, please share below…..

newsThe National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) and the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition (CIIC) emphasize the need for strong recommendations from all healthcare professionals as a key step to increase annual influenza (flu) vaccination rates.

In support of 2014 National Influenza Vaccination Week (December 7 to December 13), the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) and the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition (CIIC) call on all healthcare professionals to strengthen efforts to educate parents about the importance of annual flu vaccination for children age 6 months and older.

Each year in the U.S., approximately 20,000 children under 5 years of age are hospitalized from flu-related complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) there were reports of more than 400 flu-related deaths in children over the last four years. Forty-seven percent of last season’s reported 109 pediatric deaths occurred in children with no prior health problems.

“In general, the overwhelming majority of the children who die from influenza are not vaccinated and nearly half have no prior health problems,” said Carol J. Baker, MD, CIIC Chair and Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular Virology and Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. “Parents need to be reminded every year about influenza vaccination, and research tells us that healthcare professionals have the greatest influence over parents’ vaccination decisions. With flu season upon us, now is the time for healthcare professionals to make their voices loud and clear to parents.”

While influenza vaccination rates among children have increased over the past five years, Dr. Baker stresses that more work is needed to ensure all children are protected against influenza each and every year. Some children 6 months through 8 years of age may need two doses of flu vaccine to be fully protected.

Help #FightFlu – Give the Gift of Health
In an effort to heighten awareness around the upcoming holiday season, NFID launched a social media campaign including a series of shareable visuals around flu and pneumococcal disease prevention. While humorous, these visuals convey a serious message. Each year in the U.S., tens of thousands needlessly suffer, are hospitalized, and even die as a result of vaccine-preventable diseases. The worst gift you can give for the holidays is one of these infections, such as influenza or pneumococcal disease. Getting vaccinated can help you protect your own health and the health of your loved ones. For more information, visit nfid.org/gift-of-health.

About the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases
The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is a non-profit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1973 dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the causes, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases across the lifespan. Created by NFID in 2007, the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition (CIIC) is a coalition of more than 30 leading medical, public health, and parent organizations brought together by NFID to help address and improve influenza immunization rates among children. For more information, visit preventchildhoodinfluenza.org.