New Study Links Endometriosis To Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

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By Tamer Seckin, MD

didyouknow?A new study out today is linking endometriosis to a higher risk of heart disease, particularly among women aged 40 years and under. The data shows that women in this age bracket are three times more likely to develop heart attack, chest pain or blocked arteries when compared to those without endometriosis of the same age. “This should be of real concern to doctor’s treating patients with endometriosis,” said Dr. Tamer Seckin, one of a handful of gynecologic surgeons in the United States who performs deep excision of endometriosis and is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi.

The study, published today in the Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association Journal, looked at the heart risk for women with endometriosis over a 20-year period. The study followed 120,000 women, of which about nearly 12,000 had endometriosis, and found that compared to women without endometriosis women with endometriosis were 1.35 times more likely to need surgery or stenting to open blocked arteries, 1.52 times more likely to have a heart attack and nearly two times as likely to develop angina.

“Studies on endometriosis are greatly needed, and I am pleased to see this research supported by the National Institute of Health,” said Seckin. Dr. Stacey Missmer, director of epidemiologic research and reproductive medicine at Brigham’s Women’s Hospital, who co-authored the study, spoke last year at the EFA’s 6th annual medical conference held in New York City.

According to the study, researchers noted that surgical treatment of endometriosis including the removal of the uterus and ovaries possibly accounts for the higher risk of heart disease. Seckin says this has been suspected for some time and is not a surprise to him. The study also reported that surgically induced menopause before natural menopause may also be an added risk.

The peer-reviewed paper also says that there is a specific and meaningful correlation between endometriosis and coronary heart disease. Seckin believes this may be due to the confounding systemic inflammation and chronic stress and pain.

Dr. Seckin urges that removal of the uterus and/or ovaries is not the optimal treatment for women with endometriosis. That is why he opts for deep excision surgery. Excision allows the surgeon to safely and successfully remove the disease and the inflammatory tissues.

“Deep excision surgery is about removing the endometriosis tissue from the body and preserving both the reproductive organs, and any other organs affected by the disease, as endometriosis often grows outside the reproductive tract in places like the bowel and colon,” said Seckin. “Treatment should offer a woman the best chance to regain a pain-free life, lessen long-term side effects from alternative therapies used to treat symptoms, and provide an opportunity for her to have children.”

Alternative therapies can include the use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and painkillers for treating patients with endometriosis. The study did account for oral contraceptive and hormone replacement exposure but could not evaluate details of other hormonal treatments or the use of painkillers.

While he is busy advocating that the reproductive organs not be removed during endometriosis treatment, Seckin also expresses concerns about the dangers of long-term usage of hormones and pain medications. “These therapies have their risks,” he added.“Whether-or-not heart disease is one of these dangers, or the disease itself is the cause has still to be determined, but this study tells us something is increasing the risk for heart disease in women with endometriosis.”

Seckin said that the study convinces him that removing the disease through minimally invasive surgery gives women the most relief from their symptoms and does not expose them to side-effects that could put their overall health at risk.

– Tamer Seckin, MD, is an endometriosis specialist and surgeon in private practice in New York at Lenox Hill Hospital. He is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi. The EFA mission is to increase disease recognition, provide advocacy, facilitate expert surgical training, and fund landmark endometriosis research. Dr. Seckin is the author of “The Doctor Will See You Now; Recognizing and Treating Endometriosis” published March 2016 by Turner Publishing.

Higher BMI Associated With Reduced Costs, Better Health For Diabetics

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

diabeteswordIt’s a paradox: Diabetics with above-normal weight use health care less and report overall better physical health than their diabetic counterparts with normal weight, according to two new studies from UC Davis Health System. The authors suggest that the extra weight isn’t protecting diabetics as commonly assumed, but that normal-weight people with diabetes are afflicted with a more severe form of the disease.

Prior studies found that diabetics with normal BMIs have a higher mortality risk than those who are overweight or obese.

“The mortality paradox led to the ‘protection explanation’ that seems unlikely to be true because we didn’t see any beneficial effects of excess weight in people who did not have diabetes,” said Anthony Jerant, professor of family and community medicine at UC Davis and lead author of the studies. “The possibility that there is more than one form of type 2 diabetes is supported by basic science studies showing physiological differences in leaner people with diabetes.”

For their research, Jerant and his colleagues evaluated data on about 120,000 patients in the 2000-2011 Medical Expenditures Panel Surveys (MEPS), an annual assessment from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on health status, medical services and health care costs among a representative sample of U.S. civilians.

Characterized by unstable blood sugar levels, diabetes is currently diagnosed as type 1, an unpreventable form typically diagnosed in children or young adults, or type 2, which mostly affects adults and is linked with unhealthy lifestyles. Because the vast majority — about 90 percent — of the nearly 30 million diabetics in the U.S. have type 2, the study results are most applicable to type 2 diabetes.

In a study published online March 20 in the journal Medical Care, the UC Davis team compared health care expenditures, hospitalizations and emergency department visits for those with and without diabetes and in relation to their BMIs (normal, overweight or obese), a standard measure of weight adjusted for height. For all three study criteria, health care utilization was significantly higher in normal weight than in heavier diabetic persons, differences that were not observed in those who did not have diabetes.

In another study published online April 27 in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes, the researchers evaluated results of self-reported physical and mental health status for patients with and without diabetes. Overall, those with diabetes had worse physical and mental health status than non-diabetic persons. Among just those with diabetes, physical health status was better for those who were either overweight or obese as compared to those who had normal weight, and most optimal for those who were overweight.

Jerant believes the new findings provide evidence that it’s time to quit thinking that leaner type 2 diabetics are at lower risk for bad outcomes from the disease than their heavier counterparts.

“Researchers should be looking at genetic and metabolic factors that define type 2 diabetes for those with different weights,” said Jerant. “Teasing out those factors could eventually enable us to develop and test diabetes management plans that address those differences.”

Jerant’s co-authors were Peter Franks and Klea Bertakis, professors of family and community medicine at UC Davis. They received no external funding for their research.

“Body Mass Index and Health Care Utilization in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Individuals” is available at http://journals.lww.com/lww-medicalcare/Abstract/publishahead/Body_Mass_Index_and_Health_Care_Utilization_in.99062.aspx.

“Body Mass Index and Health Status in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Individuals” is available at http://www.nature.com/nutd/journal/v5/n4/full/nutd20152a.html

For more information about UC Davis Health System and its Department of Family and Community Medicine, visit http://healthsystem.ucdavis.edu.

Obesity May Be Tied To Higher Death Risk In Children Who Are Seriously Ill

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applevectorFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very good article I wanted to promote from Medical Xpress via HealthDay written by Amy Norton entitled In seriously ill kids, obesity may be tied to higher death risk: study. Over the years, this web site has discussed in length the health concerns over being obese, especially for children. Obese related illnesses are up, including heart disease, asthma, weak joints, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. So many children have become very sedentary, engaged in technology instead of physical activity. Now, new research suggests obese children hospitalized for certain serious illnesses may have a higher risk of dying than thinner patients. So far, this research is in what they called a ‘suggestive link’ category, and is not meant to suggest that critically ill children are more likely to die if they’re obese. It is just mentioning potential risks associated with obese children who are seriously ill. Please visit the Medical Xpress web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

Obese children hospitalized for certain serious illnesses may have a higher risk of dying than thinner patients, a new research review suggests.

Experts caution that the findings are just “suggestive” of a link, and do not prove that critically ill children are more likely to die if they’re obese.

But the results, published online March 11 in JAMA Pediatrics, add to the list of potential risks tied to childhood obesity.

Past studies have found that obese children face higher rates of some long-term health problems, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and asthma. They also tend to become obese adults, with all the potential health consequences that come with that, including increased risks of heart disease and certain cancers.

“This (study) suggests there may be more to childhood obesity than the risks we already know of,” said lead researcher Lori Bechard, a clinical nutrition specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital. “There may also be some near-term risks.”

Bechard stressed, however, that the studies in her team’s review had a number of limitations. They also varied widely in how they were done, and even in how they defined obesity.

“We don’t feel confident that we can say there is an association” between obesity and seriously ill children’s risk of dying, Bechard said. “We need more research.”

Given that roughly 17 percent of U.S. children and teens are obese, this possible connection, if proven, could have significant implications.

The findings are based on data from 28 past studies of children ages 2 to 18 who were hospitalized for various reasons. Twenty-one studies looked at kids’ risk of dying, and half of them found that for children with serious illnesses, obesity was linked to an increased risk of death.

To read the full article…..Click here

Long Term Chiropractic Patients Have Higher Blood Levels Of DNA Repair Chemicals

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By Dr. Kevin Kita

dnaThe February 18, 2005 issue of the Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research finds that patients under long-term chiropractic care have higher levels of the blood chemicals associated with effective DNA repair and overall wellness.

The test was a retrospective analysis of 46 patients, all over the age of 40 who had been under short- term chiropractic care for 8-52 weeks or long term wellness care for 52-312 weeks. Researchers assessed the levels of serum thiols, blood factors that have been found to help the body repair the damaging effects stress has on the structure of DNA. Serum thiols are measured in terms of nM cysteine.

The authors found that non-chiropractic treated patients in the control group had serum thiol levels of 124 nM cysteine. Patients with active disease processes going on generally had levels below 90 compared to patients under long-term chiropractic care who had values of 146.

In their conclusion, the authors say, “some final observations should be noted. The results clearly support the recommendations being made for wellness care by chiropractors. In addition, it should be stated that these results occurred under normal practice conditions and indicate what most chiropractors are likely achieving when performing long-term care. Also, it refutes earlier that five to seven years of care was necessary to optimize human health status, as indicated by serum thiol levels. Our sampling indicates that this can occur in a time frame approximately half that period. Finally, there is no doubt that chiropractic care was the dominant factor in being able to realize thiol values that in some cases have not been seen in nutriceutical testing, the only other intervention shown to improve thiol values.”

Long term chiropractic patients have higher blood levels of DNA repair chemicals.

(2005). In Touch, 9,1.

– Dr. Kevin Kita, Chiropractor, Author, International Speaker, and Radio Host.

Dr. Kita is well known among his patients for his compassion, wisdom, astonishing intuition, gentle and caring demeanor, and non-invasive chiropractic technique. He is a 1997 graduate of the Sherman Chiropractic College and has been practicing Chiropractic in the Yardley/Morrisville area for the past 15 years.

Dr. Kita was an international speaker and teacher for the Koren Specific Technique and has been featured on numerous television and radio shows for health related issues, Chiropractic, and for his book Healing Journeys Stories of Mind, Body, and Spirit. He was the Chiropractor for the Trenton Shooting Stars professional basketball team. Dr. Kita was also the publisher for an internationally recognized Chiropractic newsletter and has spoken to many companies and groups regarding the benefits of Chiropractic care.

Dr. Kita is on the board of the Ivins Outreach Center and is involved in many other local charities. He is considered the Chiropractor’s Chiropractor because there are many Chiropractors that seek him out for care and professional advice.

Long Term Chiropractic Patients Have Higher Blood Levels Of DNA Repair Chemicals

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By Dr. Kevin Kita

doctorThe February 18, 2005 issue of the Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research finds that patients under long-term chiropractic care have higher levels of the blood chemicals associated with effective DNA repair and overall wellness.

The test was a retrospective analysis of 46 patients, all over the age of 40 who had been under short- term chiropractic care for 8-52 weeks or long term wellness care for 52-312 weeks. Researchers assessed the levels of serum thiols, blood factors that have been found to help the body repair the damaging effects stress has on the structure of DNA. Serum thiols are measured in terms of nM cysteine.
The authors found that non-chiropractic treated patients in the control group had serum thiol levels of 124 nM cysteine. Patients with active disease processes going on generally had levels below 90 compared to patients under long-term chiropractic care who had values of 146.

patients under long-term chiropractic care have higher levels of the blood chemicals associated with effective DNA repair and overall wellness.

In their conclusion, the authors say, “some final observations should be noted. The results clearly support the recommendations being made for wellness care by chiropractors. In addition, it should be stated that these results occurred under normal practice conditions and indicate what most chiropractors are likely achieving when performing long-term care. Also, it refutes earlier that five to seven years of care was necessary to optimize human health status, as indicated by serum thiol levels. Our sampling indicates that this can occur in a time frame approximately half that period. Finally, there is no doubt that chiropractic care was the dominant factor in being able to realize thiol values that in some cases have not been seen in nutriceutical testing, the only other intervention shown to improve thiol values.”
Long term chiropractic patients have higher blood levels of DNA repair chemicals.

(2005). In Touch, 9,1.

– Dr. Kevin Kita, Chiropractor, Author, International Speaker, and Radio Host.

Dr. Kita is well known among his patients for his compassion, wisdom, astonishing intuition, gentle and caring demeanor, and non-invasive chiropractic technique. He is a 1997 graduate of the Sherman Chiropractic College and has been practicing Chiropractic in the Yardley/Morrisville area for the past 15 years.

Dr. Kita was an international speaker and teacher for the Koren Specific Technique and has been featured on numerous television and radio shows for health related issues, Chiropractic, and for his book Healing Journeys Stories of Mind, Body, and Spirit. He was the Chiropractor for the Trenton Shooting Stars professional basketball team. Dr. Kita was also the publisher for an internationally recognized Chiropractic newsletter and has spoken to many companies and groups regarding the benefits of Chiropractic care.

Dr. Kita is on the board of the Ivins Outreach Center and is involved in many other local charities. He is considered the Chiropractor’s Chiropractor because there are many Chiropractors that seek him out for care and professional advice.

Former Swim Star Susie O’Neill Warns Childhood Obesity Could Put Olympic Future In Peril

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basketballvectorFrom Your Health Journal…..”I always like to promote News.com.au from Australia, as I always enjoy their health articles, many of them aimed at fighting childhood obesity. Today’s article review is called Former Swim Star Susie O’Neill Warns Childhood Obesity Could Put Olympic Future In Peril written by Rosie Squires of the News Limited Network. So many Olympic athletes are very supportive in the fight against childhood obesity. Who better to speak on this then someone who has trained their whole lives to be the best at one sport, someone who is very disciplined in their trade. Susie O’Neill, an Olympic gold medalist is speaking out about the childhood obesity epidemic not only facing the youth of the world, but her home country. She fears we may one day be unable to field an Olympic team at all. Suzie feels that the current crop of young kids simply didn’t have the same drive to play sport and keep active as her generation did. She may be right, as the current generation of children are the technology generation, where they play on their computers, Ipads, or video games, rather than play outside with physical activity. Obesity is on the rise all over the world, and many children suffer from chronic illness due to obesity such as heart disease, cancer, weak joints, and type 2 diabetes. Not to mention, many of these same children get bullied at school and have low self esteem. So, please visit the News.com.au web site and read this interesting article. The link is provided below.”

From the article…..

She’s one of our greatest swimmers but Susie O’Neill is so concerned about the health and fitness of our children she fears we may one day be unable to field an Olympic team at all.

The dual gold medallist, known affectionately as Madame Butterfly by an adoring nation, said the current crop of young kids simply didn’t have the same drive to play sport and keep active as her generation did.

“It is a concern. If you imagine a pyramid, the elite person is the top of the pyramid, and that person is higher if you have a bigger base – so the more kids you have doing sport, and competing for the top, the higher that top athlete is,” the mother-of-two told News Limited. “We need that big base to draw kids from.”

O’Neill pointed to the poor performance of our swim team at the 2012 London Olympics, where they brought home only one gold medal, to issue a grim warning for sports fans.

“Look at what happened to the Olympic team last year,” she said.

“Will we even have an Olympic team in the future?”

O’Neill expressed her fears as she launched a nationwide health campaign with the Australian Food and Grocery Council called Together Counts.

The campaign aims to teach Australians how to balance diet and exercise via a website, which offers meal suggestions, lunchbox ideas and physical activity tips for the family.

O’Neill, 39, said Australians needed to start taking responsibility for their fitness.

“I was shocked to learn that one in four children are overweight or obese,” she said.

“I think families need to be taking more responsibility. We need to be doing exercise as a family and eating nutritious meals.”

To read the complete article…..Click here

Living At Higher Altitudes Tied To Lower Obesity Risk

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scaleFrom Your Health Journal…..A great article by Reuters that discusses how Living At Higher Altitudes Is Tied To Lower Obesity Risk. According to a new study, people in the United States who live at higher altitudes where the air is thinnest are less likely to be obese than those in low-lying areas. People who lived closest to sea level were four to five times more likely to be obese, compared to people who live well above sea level. Can you see it now, everyone is packing up their bags and moving to the higher altitudes – well, maybe not, but it is interesting news. The researchers found that adults living in the lowest altitude range had a Body Mass Index (BMI) – a measure of weight against height – of 26.6. That compared to a BMI of 24.2 for people who lived in the highest altitude range. Although they have not pinpointed the reason why, it will be interesting to see what they find out in the future on this topic. Please visit the Reuters web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

People in the United States who live at higher altitudes where the air is thinnest are less likely to be obese than those in low-lying areas, according to a U.S. study.

Using data for more than 400,000 people, researchers who published their results in the International Journal of Obesity found that people who lived closest to sea level were four to five times more likely to be obese, compared to people who live well above sea level in Colorado.

“I was surprised by the magnitude of the effect,” said lead author Jameson Voss, from Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. “I wasn’t expecting such a consistent pattern as what was emerging.”

About 36 percent of U.S. adults are obese, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Rates vary across the nation, however, with a higher percentage of obese adults in southern states. Western states, such as Nevada and Colorado, report the fewest obese adults.

The reasons behind the difference are unclear, said Voss and his colleagues, but one possible explanation is differences in elevation – which can affect appetite hormones, growth and how many calories the body burns.

For the study, the researchers combined information from several databases, including a telephone health survey of 422,603 U.S. residents from 2011.

They had information on 236 people who lived at the highest altitude of at least 3,000 meters (about 9,800 feet) above sea level. They all lived in Colorado and tended to smoke less, eat healthier and exercise more.

The researchers also had information on 322,681 people who lived in the lowest altitude range, or less than 500 m (about 1,600 feet) above sea level.

To read the full article…..Click here

U.S. Adults With Mental Illness Have Higher Smoking Rates

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smokingFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting release from The Robert Wood Johnson about adults with mental illness having a higher smoking percentage rate that those with no mental illness. A study found that 36 percent of adults diagnosed with a mental illness are cigarette smokers, compared with only 21 percent of adults who have no mental illness. This was an interesting finding, and of course, the first question I have is what defines mental illness. The report states mental illness was defined as having a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder, excluding developmental and substance use disorders, in the past 12 months. Regardless, it is an interesting finding, and I encourage you to go to the RWJF web site to read the complete post. Maybe it can help someone you know.”

From the article…..

Adults with mental illness have a smoking rate 70 percent higher than adults with no mental illness, according to the February 2013 Vital Signs report released yesterday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report was done in collaboration with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and found that 36 percent of adults with a mental illness are cigarette smokers, compared with only 21 percent of adults who do not have a mental illness. Among adults with mental illness, smoking prevalence is especially high among younger adults, American Indians, Alaska Natives, those living below the poverty line, and those with lower levels of education. Differences also exist across states. Smoking prevalence for people with mental illness ranges from 18.2 percent in Utah to 48.7 percent in West Virginia. The data used to determine the smoking rates in the Vital Signs report comes from 2009–2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Mental illness was defined as having a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder, excluding developmental and substance use disorders, in the past 12 months.

To read the complete article…..Click here

High Fructose Consumption, Higher Diabetes

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From Your Health Journal…..”There has been direct correlation between the rise in childhood obesity and the increase in type 2 diabetes for children. The key to fixing this concern is through educating children and their families. High fructose foods can sometimes be quite appealing to many young children, but also rich in calories. Since Type 2 diabetes is environmental, children (and adults) need to be careful what they eat, including foods rich in fructose – – which can contribute to obesity. The study used in this article supports this statement.”

Large amounts of high-fructose corn syrup may be one of the factors for the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, U.S. and British researchers suggest.

The study, published in Global Public Health, found countries with higher use of high-fructose corn syrup had an average prevalence of type 2 diabetes of 8 percent compared to 6.7 percent in countries not using high-fructose corn syrup.

“High-fructose corn syrup appears to pose a serious public health problem on a global scale,” said principal study author Michael Goran, director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center and co-director of the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute at the Keck School of Medicine at University of Southern California, in a statement. “The study adds to a growing body of scientific literature that indicates high-fructose corn syrup consumption may result in negative health consequences distinct from and more deleterious than natural sugar.”

– From UPI