Brisk, Regular Walking Helps Lessen Heart Disease Risk

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your comments below…..

familywalk2A regular walking routine can lower blood pressure, stave off diabetes, and prevent heart disease. Finding walking buddies, using a pedometer, and following a walking workout plan may help people stick to a program.

Walking is a low-impact, do-anywhere exercise that helps lower blood pressure and stave off diabetes. And two large, long-term Harvard studies suggest that walking for about 20 minutes a day may cut the risk of heart disease by as much as 30%, according to the December 2015 Harvard Heart Letter.

But many people need some added inspiration to start — and stick with — a walking program. One of the best ways is to find walking buddies, says Dr. Lauren Elson, physical medicine and rehabilitation instructor at Harvard Medical School. “I find that if I can get someone to walk with — a partner, a spouse, or a friend — that helps a lot.” Even better is getting several friends to walk together, because they all hold each other accountable. “They call each other up and say, ‘Where are you?’” Dr. Elson says.

Other people find motivation by using a pedometer to track their steps and distance, says Dr. Elson. One review of 26 studies found that people who used pedometers raised their physical activity levels by nearly 27%, adding about 2,500 steps a day. Most stores that sell exercise equipment have inexpensive pedometers. Other options include smartphone apps that track steps, such as Moves, Breeze, or Pedometer++.

For people who’ve had a heart attack or been diagnosed with heart disease, walking is an ideal exercise because it can be easily adapted based on a person’s fitness level. People with heart failure should ask their physician to recommend a cardiac rehabilitation program to safely reap the benefits of exercise. This type of supervised exercise is particularly helpful for people who haven’t been active for a while.

Read the full-length article: “Marching orders: How to start a walking program”

Also in the November 2015 issue of the Harvard Heart Letter:

* Cardiac rehabilitation: Best medicine for recovery

* Heart-friendly holiday eating

* When blood pressure dips too low

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Strength Training Improves Heart Health

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health….please share your comments below…..

healthyheartStrength training has been linked to several factors that improve heart health, including weight loss, less belly fat, and a lower risk of diabetes and high blood pressure.

Aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, biking, and swimming, is good for the heart. Strength training, also known as weight training or resistance training, also has cardiovascular benefits, reports the June 2015 Harvard Heart Letter.

“Strength training maintains and may even increase muscle mass, which people tend to lose as they age,” says Dr. Rania Mekary, a visiting assistant professor of surgery at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and assistant professor at MCPHS University. Increased muscle mass has a trickle-down effect that benefits blood vessels and the heart.

Boosting muscle mass speeds up metabolism, which helps people burn more calories, even at rest. A faster metabolism also helps prevent weight gain, which puts extra strain on the heart. Strength training seems to be especially important for keeping off belly fat. This so-called visceral fat, which surrounds the internal organs, is particularly dangerous.

Mekary and colleagues at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that healthy men who did weight training for 20 minutes a day had less of an age-related increase in abdominal fat compared with men who spent the same amount of time doing aerobic exercise.

Strength training can help control blood sugar levels by drawing glucose from the bloodstream to power muscles. High blood sugar, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is also a leading risk factor for heart disease. Building more muscle mass also makes the body more sensitive to the effects of insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels.

Read the full-length article: “Add strength training to your fitness plan”

Also in the June 2015 Harvard Heart Letter:

* Get cracking: why you should eat more nuts

* Get a leg up on varicose veins

* Bypass plus angioplasty: the best of both worlds?

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Why Annual Eye Exams Can Improve Heart Health

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eyeThis article is courtesy of PRWeb, please leave your comments below. Although it discusses February as Heart month in the article, it still has some great tips…..

Many people may not be aware that an eye exam could prevent a future heart event or know that vision health is linked to cardiovascular health. During American Heart Month, Dr. Stewart Shofner of Shofner Vision Center shares why scheduling regular eye exams may also improve heart health.

“A trip to the eye doctor can identify other diseases before symptoms appear,” says Dr. Shofner. Some health conditions can also cause vision loss when not addressed timely. During an eye exam, an optometrist or ophthalmologist thoroughly examines the retina and can view small changes in the blood vessels in the back of the eye.

Changes in the eye’s blood vessels can indicate more serious systemic diseases such as hypertension (high blood pressure). Hypertension affects over 65 million Americans and many don’t even know they have it. “This disease doesn’t always show symptoms,” says Dr. Shofner.

The more advanced digital retinal imaging allows an eye doctor to quickly and painlessly detect and monitor blood flow in the retina. Ongoing research is proving that these changes in the retina can predict cardiovascular disease. This includes predicting one’s risk of having a stroke, high blood pressure or even a heart attack. Prevention is key to maintaining both vision health and heart health.

Vision Changes
“Anyone that experiences vision changes and has not had an eye exam in over a year should schedule an appointment with their local vision center,“ says Dr. Shofner. In some cases, hypertensive retinopathy can cause vision loss from retinal veins becoming obstructed.

Prevention
Researchers continue to confirm that certain risk factors such as smoking, obesity and high cholesterol levels can increase cardiovascular disease and put one’s vision at risk. Exercising, refraining from smoke (includes second hand smoke), maintaining a healthy weight and eating a heart healthy diet rich in antioxidants and omega-3s will help improve vision and heart health. It’s always recommended that patients consult with their primary care physician before starting an exercise program or taking nutritional supplements.

Many people may not be aware that an eye exam could prevent a future heart event.

American Heart Month
The CDC reports heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women. Supporting American Heart Month could positively impact lives. Shofner Vision Center along with other leading health professionals encourages Americans to visit the Million Hearts® website to find tools that can assist with making heart-healthy goals that last a lifetime.

About Dr. Shofner
Recognized by his peers as one of the most outstanding Board Certified Ophthalmologist in the United States, Dr. Stewart Shofner has performed over 30,000 LASIK procedures and 10,000 ocular surgeries and his business continues to grow…mostly from patient referrals. Dr. Shofner has outstanding credentials to deliver the best care and surgical outcomes for patients.

About Shofner Vision Center
Shofner Vision Center provides comprehensive vision care services including LASIK/PRK vision correction, cataract surgery and eye disease diagnosis and treatment. Shofner Vision Center utilizes the most advanced, proven technology to deliver the best solutions safely and reliably. Patients can schedule appointments online or call 615-340-4733.

Silent Ischemia Poses A Threat To The Heart

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Courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your comments below. This article is from May, but still has good information in it.

healthyheartWhen the heart temporarily gets less blood than it needs, it’s known as cardiac ischemia. Often the result of clogged heart arteries, ischemia can cause chest pain (angina).

Poor blood flow to the heart during exercise, stress, or other times when the heart works harder can cause the chest pain known as angina. This pain may be centered in the chest, or it may spread to the shoulders, arms, neck, or jaw. Sometimes, though, there’s no pain at all. This condition, called silent ischemia, is surprisingly common, according to the May 2015 Harvard Heart Letter.

Ischemia comes from a Latin term that means “stopping blood.” It occurs when something, usually a coronary artery narrowed by cholesterol-laden plaque, fails to deliver enough oxygen-rich blood to part of the heart muscle when the heart needs to work harder.

“People with heart disease may have five to 10 times as many episodes of silent ischemia as symptomatic ischemia,” says Dr. Peter Stone, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the vascular profiling research group at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Ischemia — whether it’s painful or not — raises the risk of heart attack, especially in people who have high blood pressure or other factors that stress the heart. Things that can trigger silent ischemia or angina include:

* walking outside briskly on a cold, windy, or humid day

* hurrying with a heavy load

* exerting yourself after a heavy meal

* working under a deadline

* speaking in public

* engaging in sexual activity

* being worried, tense, or angry.

Detecting silent ischemia can be a challenge. It is often discovered during a stress test to check for possible heart disease.
Several types of medication are used to treat ischemia. These include beta blockers, which lower the heart’s workload; calcium-channel blockers and nitrates, which improve blood flow by widening coronary arteries; and ranolazine (Ranexa), which also improves blood flow to the heart muscle.

Read the full-length article, “Angina and its silent cousin”

Also in the May 2015 issue of the Harvard Heart Letter:

* Life’s “Simple 7”: Ways to improve cardiovascular health

* The downside of too much sitting

* Weight-loss drugs and your heart

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Study Links Fatty Liver And Heart Failure In Obese People

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb….please share your thoughts below…..

newsFatty liver is independently associated with subclinical heart failure in obese people, according to a new study published online, January 26, in the journal Radiology. The findings add more support to the importance of dietary interventions in such patients, researchers said.

Fatty liver is independently associated with subclinical heart failure in obese people, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. The findings add more support to the importance of dietary interventions in such patients, researchers said.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), also known as hepatic steatosis, is the most common liver disease, with a prevalence of up to 30 percent in the general population and between 70 percent and 90 percent among persons who are obese or have type 2 diabetes. NAFLD is considered as a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors like high blood pressure, excess abdominal fat and unhealthy cholesterol levels that raise the risk of heart attacks, strokes and other health problems.

“One of the unique aspects of our study is that we took all of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome into account as possible confounders in this association, as the metabolic syndrome is associated with NAFLD and with cardiovascular disease,” said study lead author Ralph L. Widya, M.D., from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, the Netherlands.

For the study, Dr. Widya and colleagues used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to noninvasively measure hepatic triglyceride content, a measure of fat in the liver, and cardiac MRI to assess left ventricular diastolic function in 714 men and women aged 45 to 65 years. Of the 714 patients, 47 percent were categorized as overweight, and 13 percent were classified as obese.

The left ventricle is the heart’s main pumping chamber, and diastolic function refers to the phase of the heartbeat when the heart relaxes to fill with blood. Abnormalities of diastolic function, represented by inefficient filling of the heart, play a major role in exercise intolerance in patients presenting with heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction has been clinically undervalued and is currently gaining major attention by cardiologists and general physicians, according to senior author Hildo J. Lamb, M.D., Ph.D., also from Leiden University Medical Center.

Results indicated that an increase in hepatic triglyceride content was associated with a decrease in mean left ventricular diastolic function in the obese subgroup of the study population. The association between hepatic triglyceride content and left ventricular diastolic function existed independently of the metabolic syndrome, suggesting that fatty liver itself could, at least in obese people, pose a risk of heart dysfunction above and beyond known cardiovascular risk factors that are clustered within the metabolic syndrome.

“Our results may be of importance in cardiovascular risk stratification in obesity, because there is a large variation in the degree of hepatic steatosis in obesity,” Dr. Widya said. “Also, more emphasis should be put on dietary interventions to reduce or prevent hepatic steatosis.”

The reasons for the link between fatty liver and heart function are unknown, Dr. Widya said, but could be related to several factors, including the presence of infection-fighting white bloods cells called macrophages or increased expression in the liver of small proteins known as cytokines.

Future research is required to study the effect of NAFLD on cardiovascular events, according to Drs. Widya and Lamb, and further study is needed to investigate to what extent the association exists and differs among normal weight, overweight and obese persons.

New Study Links Endometriosis To Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

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By Tamer Seckin, MD

didyouknow?A new study out today is linking endometriosis to a higher risk of heart disease, particularly among women aged 40 years and under. The data shows that women in this age bracket are three times more likely to develop heart attack, chest pain or blocked arteries when compared to those without endometriosis of the same age. “This should be of real concern to doctor’s treating patients with endometriosis,” said Dr. Tamer Seckin, one of a handful of gynecologic surgeons in the United States who performs deep excision of endometriosis and is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi.

The study, published today in the Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association Journal, looked at the heart risk for women with endometriosis over a 20-year period. The study followed 120,000 women, of which about nearly 12,000 had endometriosis, and found that compared to women without endometriosis women with endometriosis were 1.35 times more likely to need surgery or stenting to open blocked arteries, 1.52 times more likely to have a heart attack and nearly two times as likely to develop angina.

“Studies on endometriosis are greatly needed, and I am pleased to see this research supported by the National Institute of Health,” said Seckin. Dr. Stacey Missmer, director of epidemiologic research and reproductive medicine at Brigham’s Women’s Hospital, who co-authored the study, spoke last year at the EFA’s 6th annual medical conference held in New York City.

According to the study, researchers noted that surgical treatment of endometriosis including the removal of the uterus and ovaries possibly accounts for the higher risk of heart disease. Seckin says this has been suspected for some time and is not a surprise to him. The study also reported that surgically induced menopause before natural menopause may also be an added risk.

The peer-reviewed paper also says that there is a specific and meaningful correlation between endometriosis and coronary heart disease. Seckin believes this may be due to the confounding systemic inflammation and chronic stress and pain.

Dr. Seckin urges that removal of the uterus and/or ovaries is not the optimal treatment for women with endometriosis. That is why he opts for deep excision surgery. Excision allows the surgeon to safely and successfully remove the disease and the inflammatory tissues.

“Deep excision surgery is about removing the endometriosis tissue from the body and preserving both the reproductive organs, and any other organs affected by the disease, as endometriosis often grows outside the reproductive tract in places like the bowel and colon,” said Seckin. “Treatment should offer a woman the best chance to regain a pain-free life, lessen long-term side effects from alternative therapies used to treat symptoms, and provide an opportunity for her to have children.”

Alternative therapies can include the use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and painkillers for treating patients with endometriosis. The study did account for oral contraceptive and hormone replacement exposure but could not evaluate details of other hormonal treatments or the use of painkillers.

While he is busy advocating that the reproductive organs not be removed during endometriosis treatment, Seckin also expresses concerns about the dangers of long-term usage of hormones and pain medications. “These therapies have their risks,” he added.“Whether-or-not heart disease is one of these dangers, or the disease itself is the cause has still to be determined, but this study tells us something is increasing the risk for heart disease in women with endometriosis.”

Seckin said that the study convinces him that removing the disease through minimally invasive surgery gives women the most relief from their symptoms and does not expose them to side-effects that could put their overall health at risk.

– Tamer Seckin, MD, is an endometriosis specialist and surgeon in private practice in New York at Lenox Hill Hospital. He is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi. The EFA mission is to increase disease recognition, provide advocacy, facilitate expert surgical training, and fund landmark endometriosis research. Dr. Seckin is the author of “The Doctor Will See You Now; Recognizing and Treating Endometriosis” published March 2016 by Turner Publishing.

Health Briefs TV Presents Segment On Preventing Heart Disease

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

active familyHealth Briefs TV will soon broadcast a segment focusing on steps to take to prevent heart disease.

Health Briefs TV producers are pleased to present a segment focusing on steps to take to prevent heart disease. Roughly 60,000 people perish from the fatal medical problem every year – more than lives taken by diseases such as cancer. Medical professionals lecture patients that healthy lifestyle changes can prevent the development of heart disease, and save lives. The medically-themed segment can be seen on regional cable television networks throughout the country.

The Health Briefs TV show explores the emerging technologies, progressive treatments, revolutionary people, and innovative healthcare options that are all part of the global health industry. It explores topics relating to the health and medical fields and offers valuable information about the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many common ailments. The show’s producers take pride in sharing up-to-date, valuable information about new procedures, prevention tips and outstanding businesses. It also features interviews with innovative health and medical professionals in the industry.

Health Briefs TV is hosted by Kevin Harrington. It is headquartered in South Florida and films on location throughout the United States and Canada. It is broadcast on most regional and national cable television networks. The show is a proud leader of quality, educational programming. It is produced in part by Anthony DiMellio, Melissa Leibowitz, Andrew Mazza, and Rob Marshall. Join the fans, the show’s staff on popular social sites to discuss and comment on stories of the day. Learn more about Health Briefs TV on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest and health-briefs.com.

Whole Grains May Benefit Your Heart

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

healthyheartWhole-grain foods offer nutritional benefits beyond just the fiber from the outer layer. The nutrients and compounds from all parts of the grain offer a wide range of cardiovascular benefits and have been linked to longer life.

Foods made from whole grains, the hard, dry seeds of plants, have been a nutritional staple for thousands of years. They provide a wealth of heart-healthy nutrients, including fiber, vitamins, minerals, good fats, enzymes, antioxidants, and phytonutrients, according to the April 2015 Harvard Heart Letter.

Eating whole grains instead of highly processed grains has a wide range of health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, blood sugar, and blood cholesterol, and reducing chronic inflammation. “It is likely that all the components of whole grains work in concert to confer these benefits,” says Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

In two long-running studies, Dr. Hu and colleagues found that people who ate about two-and-a-half servings of whole grains a day were about 5% less likely to die of any cause than those who ate smaller amounts. (In this study, one serving of whole grains was one ounce, or 28 grams.) For each additional daily serving, people were about 9% less likely to die of heart disease. The researchers also found that replacing refined grains and red meats in your daily diet with an equal amount of whole grains can potentially lengthen life by 8% to 20%.

The typical American diet is loaded with highly refined grains that have been stripped of many of their nutrients and milled into a fine-textured carbohydrate. These low-quality carbohydrates, which include white rice, white bread, pastries, and other products made from white flour, are easier to cook and store than whole grains. But they lack the nutritional clout of their whole-grain cousins, even when they have been fortified with added vitamins and minerals.

Refined grains also lack dietary fiber, the part of plant foods that the body cannot digest. As fiber moves through the digestive system, it absorbs water and helps the body eliminate food waste more quickly. Fiber helps lower blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar. It’s also filling, which helps people eat less and perhaps lose weight, which also carries cardiovascular benefits.

Read the full-length article: “Reaping gains from whole grains”

Also in the April 2015 Harvard Heart Letter:

* Yoga’s health advantages may extend to the heart

* Smartphone apps for blood pressure

* High blood sugar’s effect on the brain

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Why Regular Eye Exams Can Help Prevent Serious Heart Events

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

eyeDr. Stewart Shofner of Shofner Vision Center in Nashville, TN explains why eye exams provide clues to heart and blood vessel health. “During a comprehensive eye exam, Optometrists or Ophthalmologists are able to identify heart related diseases before symptoms appear,” says Dr. Shofner. Heart Awareness Month is an appropriate time to learn more about how a comprehensive eye exam can help prevent serious heart events.

Eyes and Heart Connection

During a thorough eye examination; an eye doctor can view small changes in the blood vessels in the back of the eye, which can also predict a more serious systemic disease including high blood pressure, stroke or heart failure. Using advanced digital retinal imaging, eye doctors can detect and monitor blood flow in the retina.

Affecting almost 65 million people, high blood pressure (hypertension) is known as a “silent” disease as many don’t experience any symptoms. During a comprehensive eye examination, an eye doctor will check for subtle changes in the retina resulting from high blood pressure, also known as hypertensive retinopathy. Changes may include narrowing of the small blood vessels in the retina, arteries pressing down on veins and flame-shaped haemorrhages, among other complications. If these changes are detected, it’s imperative that a patient contacts their primary care physician to receive appropriate and timely treatment.

Vision loss may occur when blood obstructs the retina, the eye is deprived of sufficient oxygen or the macula swells. Once the central retinal vein becomes blocked, significant vision loss may occur. Artery and blood vessel obstruction in the retina can be temporary or permanent and can also cause vision loss when a blockage disrupts blood flow in the eye. More specifically, Transient monocular vision loss (TMVL) is an important warning sign that should not be ignored because this complaint may predict risk for a major cardiovascular event.

Promoting Healthy Vision, Healthy Heart

Most everyone is aware that a healthy diet and lifestyle will improve one’s overall health. Researchers show that the following risk factors link heart health with vision health and they include: smoking, obesity and high cholesterol.

healthyheartExercising and eating a heart healthy diet rich in omega-3s, antioxidants and soluble fiber will help improve both heart and eye health. It’s recommended to consult with a primary care physician before beginning any exercise or diet program. Don’t forget to visit your eye doctor annually or as recommended by your eye care professional.

According to the Department of Health, heart disease is the leading cause of death in Tennessee. Together, heart disease and stroke account for 1 out of 3 deaths in Tennessee each year. “It is imperative to help raise Heart Health Awareness, as well as the importance of regular eye exams,” says Dr. Shofner. Eye exams not only help prevent vision loss but also potentially save lives.

About Dr. Shofner

Recognized by his peers as one of the most outstanding Board Certified Ophthalmologist in the United States, Dr. Stewart Shofner has performed over 30,000 LASIK procedures and 10,000 ocular surgeries and his business continues to grow…mostly from patient referrals. Dr. Shofner has outstanding credentials to deliver the best care and surgical outcomes for patients.

About Shofner Vision Center

Shofner Vision Center provides comprehensive vision care services including LASIK/PRK vision correction, cataract surgery and eye disease diagnosis and treatment. Shofner Vision Center utilizes the most advanced, proven technology to deliver the best solutions safely and reliably. Patients can schedule appointments online or call 615-340-4733.

February Is American Heart Health Awareness Month

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

healthyheartbpThe CDC has teamed up with Million Hearts for American Heart Health Awareness and NJ Top Docs wants you to do the same.

The CDC has teamed up with Million Hearts® in order to prevent one million strokes and heart attacks in the U.S. by the year 2017. Each New Year, people all over the world set personal goals to accomplish by the end of the year. Whether it’s losing those five pesky pounds, quitting smoking, or visiting relatives more often, there should definitely be this one goal on everyone’s list: staying on top of their heart health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages people each February (and all year round), to pay attention to their blood pressure. NJ Top Docs wants its readers to join the CDC and Million Hearts® in this national campaign.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. More than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure, making it four times more likely for them to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease. Most times, there are no signs or symptoms of high blood pressure. It is imperative that people check their blood pressure regularly.

The CDC offers the following suggestions to maintaining good heart health:

“Ask your doctor what your blood pressure should be. Set a goal to lower your pressure with your doctor and talk about how you can reach your goal. Work with your health care team to make sure you meet that goal. Track your blood pressure over time. One way to do that is with this free wallet card[920 KB] from Million Hearts®.

Take your blood pressure medicine as directed. Set a timer on your phone to remember to take your medicine at the same time each day. If you are having trouble taking your medicines on time or paying for your medicines, or if you are having side effects, ask your doctor for help.

Quit smoking—and if you don’t smoke, don’t start. You can find tips and resources at CDC’s Smoking and Tobacco website.

Reduce sodium intake. Most Americans consume too much sodium, which can raise blood pressure. Read about ways to reduce your sodium and visit the Million Hearts® Healthy Eating & Lifestyle Resource Center for heart-healthy, lower-sodium recipes, meal plans, and helpful articles.”

More information about high blood pressure is available at CDC’s High Blood Pressure website. In addition, the following resources are available to help you and your loved ones make control your goal:

High Blood Pressure: How to Make Control Your Goal

Supporting Your Loved One with High Blood Pressure

African Americans Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet

Sources:
http://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/

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