All Hail Alexander The Grape!

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By Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

grapesOkay, so I’m kidding. I really do know that Alexander wasn’t a grape and vice versa. But there is something quite regal about grapes and how they benefit our health.

Grapes are rich in:

• polyphenols (naturally occurring plant compounds with antioxidants)

• resveratrol

• phenolic acids

• anthocyanins

• flavonoids

Whether you eat the fruit, seeds or skin; drink the juice; or sip on red wine, grapes can help reduce the risk of heart disease. They also can help to:

1. Reduce blood clotting and abnormal heart rhythms.

2. Lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension.

3. Slow or prevent cell damage caused by oxidation which is a main factor in atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries.)

All that goodness in such tiny fruits!

There are basically three categories of grapes: the greens, the reds, and the blue/blacks. Good color is the key to good flavor. The sweetest green grapes are yellow-green in color; red varieties that are predominantly crimson/red will have the best flavor; and blue/black varieties taste best if their color is deep and rich, almost black. If you object to seeds, look for seedless varieties.

For the most nutritional benefits select the darker colored varieties of grapes to obtain the most polyphenol benefits and be sure you eat the fruit or skins over juice when able.

A great summer treat is frozen grapes. Remove the grapes from the stem. Wash and at dry them and place them on a cookies sheet. Allow them to freeze for 4-5 hours and then remove from the cookie sheet and store them in a Ziploc or airtight container in the freezer. Frozen grapes make great ice cubes for summer drinks and also as handy snacks replacing sugary popsicles, frozen candy bars or fat-laden ice cream.

Have a grape summer!

– Kac Young has a PhD in Natural Health, a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Doctorate in Clinical Hypnotherapy. She is a television producer/director and the author of: Feng Shui the Easy Way, 21 Days to the Love of Your Life, Gold Mind, Heart Easy, Cheese Dome Power, Discover Your Spiritual Genius, Dancing With The Moon, The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies, Star Power, The Quick Guide to Bach Flower Remedies and Supreme Healing. Visit: spiritualgenius.com and HeartEasy.com for more information.

Cancer Cures In The Kitchen – Part 2

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By Dr. Michael Wald

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

healthywords12.Curcumin (sub-Himalayian ranges) a poly-phenolic compound is the principal pigment that imparts deep orange color to the turmeric. In vitro and animal studies have suggested the curcumin may have anti-tumor, antioxidant, anti-arthritic, and anti-amyloid, anti-ischemic and anti-inflammatory
Properties

13.Ginger – Himalayan ranges in the Indian subcontinent in Southeast Asia; Gingerols increase the motility of the gastrointestinal tract and have analgesic, sedative, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Studies have shown that it may reduce nausea caused by motion sickness or pregnancy and may also relieve migraines.

14.Peppers – capsaicin gives a strong, spicy pungent character. Early laboratory studies on experimental mammals suggest that capsaicin has anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogenic, analgesic and anti-diabetic properties. It also found to reduce LDL cholesterol levels in obese individuals.

15.Limes – contributes alkalinity to the body.

16.Asparagus– resh asparagus spears are good source of anti-oxidants such as lutein, zeaxanthin, carotenes andcrypto-xanthins. Together these flavonoid compounds help remove harmful oxidant free radicals from the body protect it from possible cancer, neuro-degenerative diseases and viral infections

17.Stella doro cookies – sugar!

18.Organic milk

19.Marinara sauce – organic sources

20.Active yogurt – healthy intestinal tract

21.Mustard

22.Fruit preserves – real fruit high in fiber, natural sugar (NOT the same as table sugar, which is sucrose by itself; fruits contain mostly fructose and thousands of other healthful plant phytonutrients.

omega323.Sardines – omega 3 and omega 6 when packed in olive oil

24.Organic raspberries

25.Organic blueberries

26.Organic eggs – same as organic milk benefits

27.Avocodos – monounsaturated fats; high concentration of tannin. Tannin, a poly-phenolic compound, once labeled as anti-nutritional agent, in-fact has beneficial anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer and anti-oxidant properties.

• Its flesh contains many health promoting flavonoid poly-phenolic antioxidants such as cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta and alpha carotenes in small amounts. Together, these compounds act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease processes.

28.Squash –polyphenolics, vitamin A, antioxidants, tryptophan

29.Cauliflower – indole 3 carbinol

30.Broccoli – indole 3 carbinol

31.Zucchini – rich in flavonoid poly-phenolic antioxidants such as carotenes, lutein and zeaxanthin. These compounds help scavenge harmful oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the body that play a role in aging and various disease process.

32.Tomatoes – lycopene, zanthines and vitamin C

33.Gala apples – flavonoids in apples arequercetin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2. Apples are also good in tartaric acid that gives tart flavor to them.

banana34.Bananas – B6, vitamin C, antioxidants; flavonoid poly-phenolic antioxidants such as lutein, zeaxanthin, beta and alpha carotenes in small amounts. These compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease processes. Maple syrup: polyphenols, 54 compounds in maple syrup from Canada, double the amount previously reported, and many with antioxidant activity and potential health benefits. In laboratory studies, they acted as anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agents. Initial studies also suggest that maple compounds may inhibit enzymes relevant in Type 2 diabetes management.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Cancer Cures In The Kitchen – Part 1

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By Dr. Michael Wald

healthillustratedSpecial, neurotic diets are never needed – healthy and consistent eating habits are all one needs.

All plants are loaded with minerals, vitamins, enzymes and other special phytonutrients with many specialized health benefits – if one consumes them on a regular basis. Consider consuming 6-8 pieces of fruits and vegetables everyday and/or drinking a concentrated food supplement of fruits and vegetables (see our Blood Detective nutrients at: www.blooddetective.com).

Dangers of Common Foods

1. Meat: Contains the carcinogen DES, growth hormone, estrogens, testosterone, antibiotics – linked to a variety of cancers including bladder cancer

2. Chicken – eat organic, free range and not the standard of the industry that is reared on antibiotics, steroids and treated cruely.

3. Salmon (mercury, PCBs, etc.) – Farmed or Atlantic salmon is the worst! Canned or Wild Salmon from Alaska is the best. Atlantic salmon is endangered in the US and cannot be farmed commercially; parasites, chemicals from pollution; wild Salmon from Alaska is low in contaminants; children and pregnant women should keep intake low; there are five species of wild salmon from Alaska: chinook, chum, coho, pink, and sockeye. Wild Atlantic salmon from Alaska is best; from Washington is worst – HIGH PCBs; children no more than once per months; women no more than twice per month; men no more than once per month; Atlantic salmon are usually farmed in large-scale, densely stocked netpens that pollute surrounding waters with waste and chemicals; fish can escape and compete for resources, breed with or spread parasites to wild fish. Atlantic salmon is native to the North Atlantic Ocean. In Europe, they can be found from the Arctic Circle to Portugal. In North America, they range from Quebec to Connecticut. Landlocked populations are distributed in Russia, North America and northern Europe. In addition, Atlantic salmon have been extensively introduced around the world. Although a small number of wild Atlantic salmon are caught in northern Europe, farmed fish are predominant. The main sources of farmed salmon are Norway, the United Kingdom and Chile. Atlantic salmon sold in the U.S. market is primarily farmed fish from Chile and Canada.

Note: In the United States, wild Atlantic salmon is on the Endangered Species List.

Atlantic salmon come primarily from fish farms, where they are raised in netpens. Wild fish are caught with seines. Additional types of fishing gear include gillnets, traps and hooks-and-lines.

Some Cures In The Kitchen…..

1. Oatmeal – rolled oats are a type of soluble fiber that also contains minerals, and other healthy phytoelements. Consume a brand with no added sugar – the lack of soluble fiber has been linked to colon cancer and high cholesterol

2. Blueberries – contain anthocyanadins, antioxidants, and fiber. Conditions that may benefit from high consumption include macular degeneration, glaucoma, cancers, heart disease, UTI

3. Taboule salad – hemp seeds, lemon, parsley, high vitamin C,; digestive health, enzymes for elimination, B12, folic acid, vitamin A; hemp seeds easily digestible proteins and zinc, iron and phosphorus.; lemon have over 200 enzymes, liver restorative

4. Hummus – originally Middle Eastern, chickpeas (aka garbanzo beams, lemon, put on flatbread, peanut butter consistency, tahini (sesame seeds), garlic, papricka, olive oil, – big protein – anticancer, heart disease and degenerative disease; omega 3, B6, elevates mood (tryptophane)

coffee5. Coffee – lowers colon cancer risk (most aggressive type) – should be organic; if you drink decaf get water decaffeinated (benzene, a known carcinogen) is used in the decaffination process. Too much caffeine can cause constipation but occasional intake can help constipation. Caffeine can weaken the adrenal glands. I would not recommend caffeine as a strategy to reduce colon cancer. I would rely instead on vitamin D supplementation, activated folic acid (l-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid), fiber intake and bifido and acidophilus bacteria.

6. Multigrain bread – the whole grain has not been processed out; contains wheat, rye, oatmeal, flax, etc. – omega 3 oils, minerals, phytonutrients – colon cancer

7. Cilantro – anti-oxidant polyphenolic flavonoids such asquercetin, kaempferol, rhamnetin and epigenin.

8.Turmeric – rich yellow, orange, native to Asia; anticancer; blood purifier; Alzheimer’s

9. Garlic – rich in sulfur compounds for detox; natural blood thinner

10.Fennel (popular herb in Mediterranian diet)– essential oils, minerals, fibers; Fennel seeds have many health benefiting volatile essential oil compounds such as anethole, limonene, anisic aldehyde, pinene, myrcene, fenchone, chavicol, and cineole. These active principles in the fennel seeds are known to have antioxidant, digestive, carminative and anti-flatulent properties.

11.Cinnamon – cofactors for superoxide dismutase enzyme; The active principles in the cinnamon spice are known to have anti-oxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-septic, local anesthetic, anti-inflammatory, rubefacient (warming and soothing), carminative and anti-flatulent properties.Cinnamon has highest anti-oxidant strength of all the food sources in nature.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Eating Healthy At The Airport

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By Dr. Adeyemi Fatoki

healthysaladEating healthy at the airport is a misnomer. The goal of airport food vendors is not to help you eat healthy but to make you eat more and keep coming back. What every traveler should keep in mind is that eating junk food once in a while is not really going to have much of an effect on your weight or health. The problem is more with the things you eat on a regular basis. Here are a few tips to help you make the best of unhealthy choices:

1. Avoid foods that are labeled low fat. They usually have more sugar and/or salt.

2. Limiting your sugar intake is more important than calories. As far as calories are concerned, if you are hungry, you will find something else to eat. It is the processed foods that we can’t stop eating. It is difficult to consume excess calories of more natural foods as you will only make yourself sick. For women, I recommend limiting you total sugar intake to 24 gm (6 teaspoons) a day and for men, 36 gm (9 teaspoons).

3. Learn to read the ingredients of food packages or refer to the nutritional information when available.

4. Avoid processed foods. Words like enriched, bleached, high fructose corn syrup, modified corn starch, artificial sweeteners and a bunch of names that you have no clue about is a good way to identify processed foods. These foods are generally called comfort foods. They are the ones we generally can’t stop eating until we finish the entire package.

5. Buy foods in smaller packages or sizes. Avoid super-sizing drinks.

6. Avoid artificial sweeteners. The body was never designed to use anything that sweet.

7. Drink water instead of soda with your meals.

8. Try to eat equal amounts of protein, carbohydrates and salads/vegetables. If not possible, do 50% protein and 50% vegetables. Protein tends to be more filling so you eat less.

9. If you can, pack your own snack. At least, you know exactly what you are eating.

– Dr. Adeyemi Fatoki, M.D., is a Bariatrician, Author, & Medical Director of Great Heights Family Medicine in Calumet City and Ottawa, IL and co-founder of Practical Health Technology Solutions and Practical Weight Management Program

Copyright 2012 Adeyemi Fatoki, MD. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.