Good Nutrition Beyond The Family Meal !

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By Stacey Antine

healthyeatingboyFamily meals are an important tool to emphasize healthy eating and social habits, but the sky is the limit when you connect good nutrition to exploring the great outdoors on family time! Warm weather means it’s time to shut off the TV, to stop texting and get connected with trees, birds, worms and so much more right in our own state, town or backyard. Here’s how to get started on your exciting outdoor adventure with family and friends:

• Mark the Calendar. Schedule play dates with nature at parks, farms, farmers’ markets events and botanical gardens by getting them on the calendar when everyone (pets, too!) is available and then, start the research!

• Start a Garden. From my personal experience of working with thousands of kids of all ages, they love to grow, harvest and cook with their hand-grown food. There is nothing more rewarding for a child (or grown-up kid) to plant carrot seeds, watch their tops grow and then, dig for orange gold when these delicious carrots loaded with beta-carotene are ready to be harvested. Remember you won’t see dancing chicken nuggets in the garden or cans of soda being dumped on the plants because it would hurt the plants. Once kids make the nature-nutrition connection and apply it to their own bodies, their light bulbs go off and you will see their food choices move in a healthier direction.

• Jump into Composting. Composting and gardening go hand-in-hand. It’s an exciting way for the family to eat more fruits and veggies to help build up the pile, reduce landfill garbage, get some exercise and hang out with worms!

• Variety Cures Boredom. Each weekend can bring a new adventure by visiting the local zoo, hike a new path, bike ride as a family and pack a fun, nutritious picnic at the local park. Splurge by camping overnight (I can promise you that you will not find any vending machines at these locations!).

• Go Veggie Picking. Visit a local farm that offers the public the opportunity to pick your own produce and enjoy the experience knowing where your food comes from.

• Bring the Binoculars. Sitting still is a new concept for many of us in our 24/7 lifestyles, but if you just rest and take in the sites, you will be amazed to watch nature at work!

• Keep a Journal. Kids love to create journals of their experiences including what foods they picked and tried, what bugs they found, and any other family adventure. Everyone can participate in drawing, writing or adding stickers of what was observed. Don’t forget the camera!

Get planning and enjoy the great outdoors with your family and remember that good nutrition is an experience that can be achieved beyond the plate at the family meal.

– Stacey Antine, MS, RD, founder, HealthBarn USA, author, Appetite for Life and recognized as top 10 dietitians nationally by Today’s Dietitian magazine for her work with HealthBarn USA.

Imagine World Peas

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by Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

greenpeasThere is a surprising amount of incredible nutrition in a green peas. Peas pack a lot of nutrition in a tiny pod. They come from the legume family, like cannelli or navy beans and share the same nutritional payloads of fiber, protein and vitamins.

Green peas are one of the most nutritious leguminous vegetables, rich in health benefiting nutrients, minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants.

Peas are also relatively low in calories in comparison to beans, and cow-peas. 100 g of green peas contains only 81 calories, and no cholesterol. These legumes are a good source of protein and soluble as well as insoluble fiber.

One half cup of peas has just as much protein ( 5 grams) as an egg or one tablespoon of peanut butter, but without the fat or cholesterol. Fresh peas are generally available from April to June, yet frozen peas retain all the taste and nutrition of fresh peas and are available all year long. Canned peas miss the mark. They lose most of their vitamin content and are packed with unhelpful salt and sugar.

In cooking peas, some people pulverize them (no offense Brits) and some people make them an afterthought. I say we start giving peas the respect they deserve and elevate them to higher place on our list of food choices.

You can use peas in a variety of different ways. I love to use them in low fat pasta salads, as a side dish with pearl onions, in green salads, stirred into a rice dish, paired with sautéed mushrooms or even added to freshly made guacamole. Try Heart Easy™ Peas Francoise alongside a rotisserie chicken for a delicious and heart-healthy meal. Or make up Heart Easy ™ Pasta, Tuna & Pea Salad which you can use as a meal or a side dish. Learn to love peas and take them to heart.

beanfranHeart Easy ™ Peas Francoise

Ingredients:

8 ounces frozen peas, 1/4 cup water, two scallions slivered into one-inch pieces, 2-3 thin slices of fat free ham, julienned, 1 low fat butter substitute like Smart Balance Light, 1/2 cup of Boston lettuce slivers.

Directions:

Combine all ingredients, except ham and butter substitute. Cook peas, scallions and water for 2-3 minutes. Pour off any remaining water and fold in the ham strips and butter substitute. Cook until butter substitute melts and ham is heated through. Add lettuce slivers at the last minute and serve.

(Traditional Peas Françoise includes the slivers of Boston lettuce. The lettuce adds both flavor and texture but you can omit if you choose.)

beanspastatunaHeart Easy ™ Pasta, Tuna & Pea Salad

Ingredients:

1 (8 oz.) bag whole grain pasta (macaroni, penne, twists)
2 (5 oz.) cans chunk light tuna in water, drained
4 celery ribs, diced
1 package (15 oz.) frozen peas, thawed
1/3-1/2 cup low fat Best Foods Mayonnaise
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4-1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
Fresh ground black pepper to taste

Directions:

Cook pasta according to package directions, but don’t overcook. Drain and allow to cool.
In a large bowl, combine pasta, celery, peas, mayonnaise. Stir until well-combined.
Add cayenne pepper and salt. Refrigerate for at least one hour before serving. Top with fresh ground pepper.

Kac Young , a former television director and producer, has earned a Ph.D. in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding.

Is Your Diet Full Of Hidden Sugars?

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By Alison Aldridge

healthyjunkMany people are now making a conscious effort to try to cut out cut down on their sugar consumption, but this is easier said than done as a lot of foods have hidden sugars. One of the major reasons for cutting down on sugar is to lose weight or at least maintain weight, but another really good reason is to help improve oral health. A diet high in sugars will increase the risk of tooth decay and gum disease as the sugar provides plenty of food for plaque bacteria which in return will produce toxins that increase the risk of cavities and gum disease.

While it’s pretty obvious that certain foods contain high amounts of sugar, others can come as something of a surprise. That healthy breakfast cereal you tuck into each morning could be one of the worst offenders. A consumer organization in the UK tested 50 different breakfast cereals and worryingly found 32 had high sugar contents, including many of those designed specifically to appeal to children. It’s the same story with as many low-fat or fat-free products that are frequently bought by people trying to watch their weight, or by those who are simply more health conscious.

A lot of people who are health conscious exercise regularly, and may use energy drinks after a heavy session at the gym. These can contain up to 13 spoonfuls of sugar, while some of the flavored vitamin waters can contain more than 10 spoonfuls of the sweet stuff.

Getting Into the Habit of Reading Labels

foodlabelIf you’re worried your diet may contain more hidden sugars then you’re aware of then it’s worth getting into the habit of reading the labels and choosing unsweetened versions of foods wherever possible. One typical example might be muesli. It can sometimes be quite tricky to adjust to eating something less sugary, but it’s worth persevering to see if your taste buds will accept the change! It can also be worthwhile trying to finish a meal with something less sweet and more tooth friendly such as crunchy vegetables or a small piece of cheese.

If you do want to have something especially sweet then try to eat or drink it as quickly as you can, as sipping a sugary drink over the course of a few hours is the worst thing you can do for your teeth. Obviously one solution can be to switch to diet versions of popular drinks, but these can also contain a lot of acid and may damage your teeth. Another solution is to try using a drinking straw when enjoying these beverages.

Gum Disease

The reasons for trying to switch to a less sugary diet are compelling, especially if it helps to lessen the risk of developing gum disease. It’s estimated up to four fifths of the population will develop some degree of gum disease at some point during their lifetime, and this risk can increase with age. Gum disease is the major cause of tooth loss in the world and is an extremely serious condition. It’s often called a silent disease as the initial symptoms can be very easy to miss, and is an excellent reason for visiting the dentist at regular intervals. It’s much easier to treat when caught early enough. Having a healthy, tooth friendly diet may help you avoid this serious condition.

– Alison completed her training at the Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, England, and she is registered with the General Dental Council in London, England. She has over twenty five years of experience working within the dental industry and currently writes for http://findmydentist.com/.

Parents, Overweight Kids, Junk Food, And Education

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healthychoiceFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting article written by Norman Byrd in Huliq which discusses how a study has concluded that the parents with a better education tend to have children who eat healthier food. A multi-nation study of over 14,000 children between the ages of 2 and 9 found a link between the level of education of the parents of the children and the level of foods likely to be deemed unhealthy and lead to obesity. Succinctly, found that parents with better educations were more likely to have children who ate more fruits and vegetables and less foods containing sugar and fats, prime contributors to obesity. Data from the study suggests that the lower the parental education level, the more likely they were to feed their children (or allow them to eat) food rich in sugars and fats. Parents with higher levels of education were more likely to introduce their children to vegetables, fruit, pasta, rice and wholemeal bread — foods of a greater nutritional value. As I have been saying for years, it is important that we help ALL parents be educated on good nutrition and the importance of physical activity, in an effort to reduce obesity among children. Obesity is on the rise, along with obesity related illnesses! Change is needed, and education is a powerful tool in the fight to reduce unhealthy lifestyle. Please take the time to visit the Huliq web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. I have included a short ‘snip’ below, but wanted to promote their site and the great work by Norman Byrd presenting this valuable information.”

From the article…..

An eight-nation study of over 14,000 children between the ages of two and nine found a link between the level of education of the parents of the children and the level of foods likely to be deemed unhealthy and lead to obesity. Succinctly, the study, according to Science Daily, found that parents with better educations were more likely to have children who ate more fruits and vegetables and less foods containing sugar and fats, prime contributors to obesity.

The Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) study took place in eight European countries — Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain and published in the journal Public Health Nutrition.

Data from the study indicated that the lower the parental education level, the more likely they were to feed their children (or allow them to eat) food rich in sugars and fats. Parents with higher levels of education were more likely to introduce their children to vegetables, fruit, pasta, rice and wholemeal bread — foods of a greater nutritional value.

Juan Miguel Fernández Alvira, the author of the work and a researcher from the University of Zaragoza in Spain, wrote: “The greatest differences among families with different levels of education are observed in the consumption of fruit, vegetables and sweet drinks.”

Fernández Alvira and his colleagues concluded that there was a greater risk of obesity in children and young adults in households where the parents were less educated. The group suggested programs targeted at areas of populations more socio-economically deficient (often the case with populations exhibiting lower education levels).

The study is also comparable to findings in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control’s annual study on obesity in America that ranks the most obese states found the American South predominated the list in 2012, with the states of Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama numbers 1, 2, and 4 (with West Virginia third, a state considered a “border southern state”). States with the least number of bachelor’s degrees (as a percentage of the population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau) constituted eight of those top ten states (with West Virginia and Mississippi first and second, respectively). And in a four-criteria survey (from The Street) that included high school graduation rate and average SAT scores, Mississippi and Louisiana made the list once more (fifth and fourth, although it should be noted that all five states were southern, with Texas, Georgia, and South Carolina rounding out the list in descending order).

To read the complete article…..Click here

More On Nutrients

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healthychoiceFrom Your Health Journal…..”An excellent article I wanted to promote written by Dr. Brian Parr for the Aiken Standard entitled Know your nutrients: Fats. This is an excellent written article about the macro-nutrients, which include carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. This article focused primarily on fats, which does get a bad rap with many people looking to eat healthy. The truth is, there are good and bad fats. Some bad fats are hidden in many foods as they increase shelf life of the product, add texture, and add some great taste. But, there are many good fats that maintain and regulate body temperature, maintain hormonal levels, insulate the body, protect body organs, help with the absorption and distribution of vitamins A,D,E, & K, and strengthen our muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, and joints. Please visit the Aiken Standard web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It was well written and very educational.”

From the article…..

Since March is National Nutrition Month, I am writing about the major nutrients in our diets: carbohydrates, fats and protein. Last week I provided information about carbohydrates, the major energy source in our diets. This week I will write about fats, including saturated fats, unsaturated (monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans) fats, omega-3 fats and cholesterol.

Fats tend to get a bad reputation since they are higher in calories than carbohydrates and protein and are associated with obesity and heart disease when eaten in excess. While this is true and some dietary fats are detrimental to your health, others have health benefits. These benefits are linked to the effect of the fats on the LDL (“bad”) and HDL (“good”) cholesterol in your blood.

Cholesterol is only found in animals and is associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Saturated fats are primarily consumed in animals as well as tropical oils such as palm and coconut oil and tend to raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. In fact, saturated fat is more strongly linked to heart disease than is cholesterol.

Unsaturated fats are found in plant oils. Polyunsaturated fats tend to lower both LDL and HDL cholesterol. Monounsaturated fats are associated with lower LDL, but they do not lower HDL cholesterol – this is better. Oils high in polyunsaturated fats include corn and soybean oil while olive and canola oils are rich in monounsaturated fats.

To read the complete article…..Click here

11 Percent Of Adult’s Calories Come From Fast Food

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beachballFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very important article/message from CBS News by Michelle Castillo called CDC: 11 percent of adult’s calories come from fast food. We have discussed so many times here the rise of obesity all around the world. People are just consuming more, exercising less. Sedentary lifestyles consumed with technology usage is a major culprit to the rise of obesity around the globe. Obesity related illness is also on the rise including heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and weak joints. Many of our diets are just plain horrible, and we are consuming too much liquid candy or alcohol, which are empty calories. Now, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11.3 percent of daily calories consumed by adults in 2007 through 2010 came from fast food. Fast food is a quick alternative to making a meal at home, and it’s steadily becoming am increasing part of the American diet. Young people as well as old need to cut back on the fatty, high calorie choices, and switch to better choices. Remember, bad food habits in a person’s 20s can set them up for a lifetime of disease. Please visit the CBS web site (link provided below) to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

How much fast food do U.S. adults eat each day? According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11.3 percent of daily calories consumed by adults in 2007 through 2010 came from fast food.

The data was pulled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Participants in the survey were asked to report what food they ate in the 24-hours before they were surveyed.

Fast food is a quick alternative to making a meal at home, and it’s steadily becoming am increasing part of the American diet, the report noted. The 2007 to 2010 fast food-calorie statistics, however, are lower than the levels reported from 2003 to 2006, when the American diet was about 13 percent fast food. Still, more needs to be done especially because eating fast food frequently has been linked to weight gain, the researchers said.

More than one-third of U.S. adults are obese, according to the CDC. Obesity has been linked to many health conditions, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer.

While the percentage of calories consumed through fast food dropped dramatically as people grew older, there was still a significant correlation between heavier weight and the amount of fast food being consumed. Obese people had the highest percentage of fast food making up their diet.

In the 20 to 39-year-old group — which had the highest percentages of fast food in terms of daily caloric consumption — obese individuals took in on average 18 percent of their daily calories from fast food. For overweight and underweight/normal people in that age group, the percentage dropped to 14.7 and 13.5 respectively.

To read the complete article…..Click here

More Antioxidants In Your Diet May Not Mean Better Health

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cupcoffeeFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting article recently on the WNKU web site entitled More Antioxidants In Your Diet May Not Mean Better Health. We have heard through the years how antioxidants were a very important part of your diet. Antioxidants help with the repair and renewing of cells in the body, strengthening our immune system. Oxidation of molecules produce free radicals which cause a chain reaction of damaged cells. Consuming antioxidants stops these chain reactions from occurring. You can find antioxidants in vitamins A,C,E, grains, fruits, and vegetables. But, in a new study, people who ate more antioxidants overall didn’t lower their risk of stroke and dementia in old age. That flies in the face of earlier research that found that the antioxidants in fruits and vegetables reduce stroke and dementia risk. Please visit the WNKU web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. I found it fascinating – as science, facts, data, health information change over time. One day, something appears healthy for you, another day, not so healthy.”

From the article…..

Antioxidants in foods are good for you, so more should be better, right?

Evidently not.

In a new study, people who ate more antioxidants overall didn’t lower their risk of stroke and dementia in old age. That flies in the face of earlier research that found that the antioxidants in fruits and vegetables reduce stroke and dementia risk.

“We’re seeing strong and clear benefits with specific antioxidants but not overall,” says Elizabeth Devore, an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital who led the new study, which was published online in the journal Neurology.

Last year, Devore found that eating lots of berries delayed cognitive decline among women in the big, ongoing Nurses Health Study. Berries have lots of chemicals called flavonoids, which researchers think probably have protective powers much like those of better-known antioxidants like beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E.

Before that, Devore had looked at data from a long-term study of more than 5,000 people ages 55 and older in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The people were followed for about 14 years. She found that people who ate foods with more vitamin E were less likely to suffer dementia, and people who ate foods with more vitamin C were less likely to have a stroke.

But now she’s looking at the same people and finds that having lots of antioxidants in the diet overall doesn’t help with stroke and dementia. What gives?

Devore tells The Salt that she reran the numbers from the earlier Rotterdam study, just to make sure she hadn’t made a mistake, and it still showed that vitamins C and E were doing good things for the brain.

In the new study, the people with the highest levels of antioxidant intake were getting most of those antioxidants from coffee and tea. Evidently, the Dutch drink a lot of coffee!

To read the full article…..Click here

Children In U.S. Eating Fewer Calories

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healthyjunkFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting article in the Salt Lake Tribune via The New York Times news service written by Abrina Tavernise entitled Children In U.S. Eating Fewer Calories. Over the past week, I have written my displeasure with the US being called the fat capital of the world in many articles I found on the net – then I produced articles from other countries like Canada, Britain, Mexico, Australia, and China stating how they have similar concerns. There is no doubt the US has a weight issue, but they are not alone. Health care cost may skyrocket in the future if change does not occur…. change is also needed to reduce obesity related illnesses such as heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and weaker joints.

Then, we read a refreshing articles which states how American children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than they did a decade before. Health experts said the findings offered an encouraging sign that the epidemic of obesity might be easing, but cautioned that the magnitude of the decline was too small to move the needle much. Please visit the Salt Lake Tribune (link provided below) to read the entire article. It was well written and informative.”

From the article…..

American children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than they did a decade before, a new federal analysis shows. Health experts said the findings offered an encouraging sign that the epidemic of obesity might be easing, but cautioned that the magnitude of the decline was too small to move the needle much.

And while energy intake has not changed considerably for adults in recent years, fewer of their calories are coming from fast food, researchers said. Obesity rates for adults have plateaued after years of increases. A third of adults are obese.

The results of the research on childhood consumption patterns, the only federal analysis of calorie trends among children in recent years, came as a surprise to researchers. For boys, calorie consumption declined by about 7 percent to 2,100 calories a day over the period of the analysis, from 1999 through 2010. For girls, it dropped by 4 percent to 1,755 calories a day.

“To reverse the current prevalence of obesity, these numbers have to be a lot bigger,” said Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University. “But they are trending in the right direction and that’s good news.”

National obesity rates for children have been flat in recent years, but some cities have reported modest declines. The new evidence of a lower calorie intake for children may also foreshadow a broader national shift, experts said.

“A harbinger of change is a good phrase,” said R. Bethene Ervin, a researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and one of the authors of the report. “But to see if it’s really a real trend we would obviously need more years of data.”

A drop in carbohydrate consumption drove the decline, a point of particular interest for those who study childhood obesity. Sugars are carbohydrates, and many argue that those added to food like cereal and soda during processing are at the heart of the childhood obesity epidemic. Ervin said it was not clear whether such added sugars alone were behind the carbohydrate decline.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Pre-school Obesity

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exerciseFrom Your Health Journal…..”A great article from My San Antonio written by Jessica Belasco about pre-school obesity. Obesity is on the rise all over the world, affecting adults and children. So many children face obese related illness such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, asthma, weak joints, and heart disease (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, physical inactivity, high triglycerides, high insulin). There are many contributors to this epidemic, including large amounts of sedentary time – homework, technology….as well as poor dietary habits. According to a new report, public health officials are worrying about excessive weight gain in the first months and years of life. More than 20 percent of children between ages 2 and 5 already are overweight or obese. Not much research has been done in helping these young children reduce the obesity problem, as much of the attention goes to older children and adults. In San Antonio, health officials believe that interventions among minority preschool children can help them develop more healthful habits. So many of these pre-schoolers eating habits are established at such a young age, which is where working with parents is essential. Please visit the My SA web site (link provided below) to read the complete artilce.”

From the article…..

Parents fall in love with chubby-cheeked infants with pudgy thighs. As children grow, their parents encourage them to clean their plates to fuel their development.

But public health officials are worrying about excessive weight gain in the first months and years of life. More than 20 percent of children between ages 2 and 5 already are overweight or obese, according to an Institute of Medicine report released in 2011, and this can set them on a dangerous trajectory toward lifelong obesity. And minority children are at a higher risk.

While mountains of studies have focused on obesity prevention in older children and adults, there hasn’t been as much research looking at young children. But researchers at the University of Texas at San Antonio and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found that interventions among minority preschool children can help them develop more healthful habits. Their study about a pilot program for preschoolers ran in the journal Childhood Obesity in October.

“So many of their eating habits are established at such a young age that this is where we’re really needing to work with parents and get the parents’ buy-in,” says Dr. Amelie Ramirez, director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the UT Health Science Center and a co-author of the study. “In the Latino culture, a healthy baby is a chubby baby. They do gain that cute baby fat, but we’re seeing nowadays so many parents letting them have so much sugared beverages and so forth at such an early age that they kind of become addicted to sweets and salt.”

The goal of the local study, called “Míranos! Look at Us, We Are Healthy!” was to create environments both at school and at home to help kids develop healthful lifestyle habits. The intent was not to promote weight loss, because the kids are growing, but to promote healthy weight gain.

The results were positive: Kids who received the intervention showed increases in outdoor physical activity and consumption of fruit, vegetables and low-fat milk, as well as higher gains of gross motor skills, compared to the kids who did not receive the intervention. They were more willing to drink water. And the intervention controlled their weight gain.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Cut The Crap On Weight Loss

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healthyjunkFrom Your Health Journal…..”I wanted to promote an article I found recently entitled It’s time to cut the crap on weight loss that appeared in the Brisbane Times of Australia, written by Michael Jarosky. Mr. Jarosky starts off by stating how sick he is of diets and all the broken promises that come with them. He makes a valid point by stating the diet section of the book store is like a candy store, many different types to choose from. Mr. Jarosky is so fed up with fad diets, he actually decided to write his own diet book (You will have to read the full story to find out why – link is provided below). He is writing the ‘Cut the Crap’ diet, where he suggests cutting out the processed food and unhealthy takeaways, the video games, the boozey benders, the sugary drinks, and the time on the couch in front of the idiot box. He believes it’s time to cut the crap and get back to the basics of healthy food and healthy exercise. It’s time for lifestyle change. Please visit the Brisbane Times web site to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

I am so sick of diets. Diets that promise five kilo weight loss in the first week; that guarantee fat-free arms, rock-hard abs, and a tiny bum. Diets with weird fruit remedies, hailing from Africa, South America or Nepal.

The diet section at the bookstore is like a candy shop – just choose your flavour. No carbs; no sugar; no wheat; no fats. Eat paleo, or eat like the French, Mediterraneans or South Beach-ians. Go veggie, go vegan, go cleanse or go lemon detox.

Some are good and some are bad. But I am so sick of the fad diets that I decided to write a diet book this week to officially jump on the bandwagon and become a dietary hypocrite.

Why? I have a client – let’s call him Rodney. Rodney is out on the town three to four nights per week. He wears a suit and a flashy watch, flashes new iGadgets each week, and drives an imported car. He chases girls. He drinks, and he eats whatever suits his tastebuds at the time. But it’s beginning to catch up with him and, in his 30s, it’s time for him to trim down.

Rodney trains hard (but not often enough) and has the frame and strength to lose serious weight – which won’t happen until he changes his intake. Rodney’s food and exercise diary? After a quick look at the Chinese food, booze, protein supplement drinks and energy drinks he consumes and the breakfast he habitually doesn’t – counterbalanced by just a single weekly workout – my reply was: “Rodney, it’s time to cut the crap.”

Two weeks ago, he finally said: “Just tell me what to eat, and I’ll follow it.”

My reply: “But mate, I’m not a nutritionist … well, screw it. I’ll write you a diet. Consider it done.”

So here I am, writing the ‘Cut the Crap’ diet. It’s time for Rodney – like many Australian men and women – to cut out the processed food and unhealthy takeaways, the video games, the boozey benders, the sugary drinks, and the time on the couch in front of the idiot box. It’s time to cut the crap and get back to the basics of healthy food and healthy exercise. It’s time for lifestyle change.

To read the complete article…..Click here