5 Health Benefits Of Soccer

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By Jeff Nachmani

boysoccerSoccer is a very beneficial game. Soccer is the greatest sport in the world. Soccer involves a higher number of viewers per year than any other team. In soccer almost one hundred and fifty teams perform. But it is played all over the world because some teams can’t even qualify in the count. Football is a very tough game to play as in a world cup there are more than a hundred teams which tend to qualify, but only thirty-two are selected. Football World cup provided by Fifa is one of the biggest sports events to happen. A football World cup takes place after four years of the previous World cup to happen and collects a great revenue. There are a lot of spectators willing to see the world cup and the viewers of a single world cup are near to the population of World. Which means this game is supported by billions of people.

There are many other events which happen to give soccer a better image. But soccer is not only beneficial for watching but it even helps us physically with these five health benefits.

1- Better Stamina

If you play football regularly and for more time it can affect your stamina a lot. In football, you need to perform a sprint in regular intervals and throughout your game. These sprints help you a lot with your stamina. If you play for a longer time, you can gain an ability to play for more time with the increase in your stamina.

2- Strong body

With better shape playing football can give you a more tough body. In football, you must go against many hurdles such as tackles. You can get injured while playing football. But receiving regular tackles and suffering pain can make your body stronger and tougher against many odds.

3- Decreases the body fat

Another big advantage of playing soccer is that it decreases the body fat of a person. Body fat is a big problem for a person. This body fat makes a person look uglier and unfit. With the increase in body fat, a lot of unhealthy problems can occur in the form of pain. With an increase in your weight your strength of doing any task decreases and if you perform any unusual or difficult task it can result in pain. But soccer helps us burn our calories to decrease our body fat.

girlsoccer4- Strength

In soccer, you regularly face hurdles and tackles. With regular receiving of these hesitations, your body gains the essential strength to overcome them.

5- Brain activity

In soccer, you have to think of various tactics, and you have to analyse the game. This helps us get Increase in Cognitive Brain Function.

If you want to get healthy, you must play football. But if you want to play soccer you must know how to play it. Soccer gap can help you as a guide.

– Jeff Nachmani is a football coach. He is obsessed with soccer and encourages outdoor games. He regularly posts at soccergap.com.

Herbal Remedies Are An Overlooked Global Health Hazard

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Submitted by the Baylor College of Medicine, please share your comments below…..

didyouknow?Millions of people around the world use herbal health remedies, following a tradition that began millennia ago. Many believe that herbs are safe because they have been used for many years, but researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Stony Brook University are raising awareness that long-term use of herbal remedies is no guarantee of their safety. The invited commentary appears in EMBO reports.

Dr. Donald M. Marcus, professor emeritus of medicine and immunology at Baylor, and Dr. Arthur P. Grollman, distinguished professor of pharmacological sciences at Stony Brook University, discuss the scientific evidence showing that the plant Aristolochia can cause aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). People with this condition experience interstitial nephritis, renal failure and cancers of the urinary track.

The authors remark that in Taiwan, according to the national prescription database, between 1997 and 2003, 8 million people were exposed to herbals containing Aristolochia. Studies of patients with renal failure and cancer in Taiwan and China show that tens of millions of people in those countries are at risk of AAN.

In genetically susceptible people, consuming Aristolochia can lead to the formation of complexes between aristolactam, a compound in Aristolachia, and DNA in renal tissues. These complexes lead to mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, which in turn initiate the process toward kidney cancer. Additional studies have shown that this process may also lead to the development of cancer in the liver and the bladder.

Marcus and Grollman indicate that other herbals and traditional medicines are responsible for severe adverse events in Africa and Asia, but in these cases epidemiological data are lacking.

Although Aristolochia has been used as a herbal remedy for more than 2000 years, “the intrinsic toxicities were not recognized, owing, in large part, to the latency period between exposure and the onset of symptomatic disease, and, in part, to genetic determinants that confer susceptibility to only approximately 5 percent of those exposed to this herb,” said the authors. The long-term scientific study of AAN revealed the association of the disease with Aristolochia.

Almost all carcinogens and many toxins require a long period of time before symptoms appear. This makes it very difficult for a layman or a professional to identify a particular compound as the cause of an illness when it was taken months or years earlier.

“The history of Aristolachia indicates that other herbs that have been used for a long time may also have toxic and/or carcinogenic compounds,” said the authors. “It is prudent to assume that many herbs may contain toxic or carcinogenic substances that can cause subsequent health problems for humans.”

Marcus and Grollman disagree with the World Health Organization’s endorsement of the use of traditional herbal remedies on the premise that traditional medicine is of proven quality, without mentioning the lack of scientific evidence supporting the efficacy of herbal remedies or their demonstrated hazards, as in the case of Aristolochia.

The authors emphasize that their primary concern is “the prevention of toxicities associated with herbal medicine and not a categorical rejection of traditional healing practices. Herbal remedies pose a global hazard. We encourage the global health community to take actions that will evaluate both long- and short-term safety, as well as the efficacy of botanical products in widespread use.”

The authors declare having no conflict of interest.

Navigating Retail Health Clinics

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications. What are your thoughts about their article….please share below…..

Retail health clinics are fine for a short-term illness or as a backup, but they should not replace a long-term relationship with a primary care physician.

newsThe hot trend of making health care more convenient is showing up in more and more local drugstores and big box chains in the form of retail health clinics, reports the March 2016 Harvard Health Letter. “Twenty years ago you had to go to an emergency department if you got sick and needed immediate care. Now we have an explosion of options, such as retail health clinics,” says Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, a researcher on the topic and an associate professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School.

Retail health clinics have many perks. They’re easy to get into, with extended hours and no appointments necessary, and they’re staffed by a nurse practitioner or a physician assistant. The clinics offer all kinds of health services—everything from treating minor illness like colds, pinkeye, or urinary tract infections to providing physicals, health screenings, and vaccinations—and the prices are often more affordable than other options. “We have found in our data that clinics are 30% to 40% cheaper than a doctor’s office visit, and 80% cheaper than an emergency room visit,” says Dr. Mehrotra.

Does the lower price translate into poor-quality care? “We’ve found that the quality of care at retail clinics is equal to or superior to some doctor’s offices, because the clinics are more likely to follow national guidelines of care,” says Dr. Mehrotra.

Despite all the perks, retail health clinics may not be right for everyone. A report from the American College of Physicians published online Oct. 13, 2015, in Annals of Internal Medicine maintains that the clinics are fine for a short-term illness or as a backup when people can’t see their doctors, but they should not replace a long-term relationship with a primary care physician. Dr. Mehrotra agrees.

Read the full-length article: “Should you use a retail health clinic?”

Also in the March 2016 issue of the Harvard Health Letter:

* The health benefits and risks of owning a pet

* Are prescription pain pills worth the risk?

* How to build a better bladder and stay dry

The Harvard Health Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/health or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free)

Strength Training Improves Heart Health

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health….please share your comments below…..

healthyheartStrength training has been linked to several factors that improve heart health, including weight loss, less belly fat, and a lower risk of diabetes and high blood pressure.

Aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, biking, and swimming, is good for the heart. Strength training, also known as weight training or resistance training, also has cardiovascular benefits, reports the June 2015 Harvard Heart Letter.

“Strength training maintains and may even increase muscle mass, which people tend to lose as they age,” says Dr. Rania Mekary, a visiting assistant professor of surgery at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and assistant professor at MCPHS University. Increased muscle mass has a trickle-down effect that benefits blood vessels and the heart.

Boosting muscle mass speeds up metabolism, which helps people burn more calories, even at rest. A faster metabolism also helps prevent weight gain, which puts extra strain on the heart. Strength training seems to be especially important for keeping off belly fat. This so-called visceral fat, which surrounds the internal organs, is particularly dangerous.

Mekary and colleagues at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that healthy men who did weight training for 20 minutes a day had less of an age-related increase in abdominal fat compared with men who spent the same amount of time doing aerobic exercise.

Strength training can help control blood sugar levels by drawing glucose from the bloodstream to power muscles. High blood sugar, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes, is also a leading risk factor for heart disease. Building more muscle mass also makes the body more sensitive to the effects of insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels.

Read the full-length article: “Add strength training to your fitness plan”

Also in the June 2015 Harvard Heart Letter:

* Get cracking: why you should eat more nuts

* Get a leg up on varicose veins

* Bypass plus angioplasty: the best of both worlds?

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Why Annual Eye Exams Can Improve Heart Health

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eyeThis article is courtesy of PRWeb, please leave your comments below. Although it discusses February as Heart month in the article, it still has some great tips…..

Many people may not be aware that an eye exam could prevent a future heart event or know that vision health is linked to cardiovascular health. During American Heart Month, Dr. Stewart Shofner of Shofner Vision Center shares why scheduling regular eye exams may also improve heart health.

“A trip to the eye doctor can identify other diseases before symptoms appear,” says Dr. Shofner. Some health conditions can also cause vision loss when not addressed timely. During an eye exam, an optometrist or ophthalmologist thoroughly examines the retina and can view small changes in the blood vessels in the back of the eye.

Changes in the eye’s blood vessels can indicate more serious systemic diseases such as hypertension (high blood pressure). Hypertension affects over 65 million Americans and many don’t even know they have it. “This disease doesn’t always show symptoms,” says Dr. Shofner.

The more advanced digital retinal imaging allows an eye doctor to quickly and painlessly detect and monitor blood flow in the retina. Ongoing research is proving that these changes in the retina can predict cardiovascular disease. This includes predicting one’s risk of having a stroke, high blood pressure or even a heart attack. Prevention is key to maintaining both vision health and heart health.

Vision Changes
“Anyone that experiences vision changes and has not had an eye exam in over a year should schedule an appointment with their local vision center,“ says Dr. Shofner. In some cases, hypertensive retinopathy can cause vision loss from retinal veins becoming obstructed.

Prevention
Researchers continue to confirm that certain risk factors such as smoking, obesity and high cholesterol levels can increase cardiovascular disease and put one’s vision at risk. Exercising, refraining from smoke (includes second hand smoke), maintaining a healthy weight and eating a heart healthy diet rich in antioxidants and omega-3s will help improve vision and heart health. It’s always recommended that patients consult with their primary care physician before starting an exercise program or taking nutritional supplements.

Many people may not be aware that an eye exam could prevent a future heart event.

American Heart Month
The CDC reports heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women. Supporting American Heart Month could positively impact lives. Shofner Vision Center along with other leading health professionals encourages Americans to visit the Million Hearts® website to find tools that can assist with making heart-healthy goals that last a lifetime.

About Dr. Shofner
Recognized by his peers as one of the most outstanding Board Certified Ophthalmologist in the United States, Dr. Stewart Shofner has performed over 30,000 LASIK procedures and 10,000 ocular surgeries and his business continues to grow…mostly from patient referrals. Dr. Shofner has outstanding credentials to deliver the best care and surgical outcomes for patients.

About Shofner Vision Center
Shofner Vision Center provides comprehensive vision care services including LASIK/PRK vision correction, cataract surgery and eye disease diagnosis and treatment. Shofner Vision Center utilizes the most advanced, proven technology to deliver the best solutions safely and reliably. Patients can schedule appointments online or call 615-340-4733.

Benefits of Bariatric Surgery For Liver Health

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This article was supplied by PRWeb, but what are your thoughts about it?? Please share in the comments section below….

newspaperAn article published July 27 on Medical Xpress detailed two separate studies that pointed to how weight loss had tremendous benefits for the health of a patient’s liver. The article focused on the study and prevalence of “nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver,” and how weight loss affected the remission of this disease. In the study that focused on weight loss surgery, it was shown that 85 percent of patients with NASH – which is also often referred to as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease – were no longer suffering from the condition when examined one year after their weight loss surgery. According to bariatric surgeon Michael Feiz, M.D., F.A.C.S, while very few similar studies have been done tying liver health directly to weight loss surgery, others, including one mentioned by the article, do examine liver health in terms of weight loss in general. Therefore, what this study (and many others pertaining to weight loss surgery’s benefit with a variety of other health conditions) really shows is that weight loss surgery is a tremendous tool to help patients lose weight. According to Dr. Feiz, there are two distinct ways that a weight loss surgery helps a patient lose the weight and keep it off:

1. “It Limits Capacity” – What all bariatric procedures have in common, notes Dr. Feiz, is that they are designed to make people feel full with less food at each meal. The gastric band technique does this by slowing the intake of food via a band placed around the entrance to the stomach, while the gastric sleeve works by actually removing a large portion of the stomach to create a smaller stomach. Dr. Feiz notes that he prefers these newer methods over the gastric bypass procedure because they do not alter the path of digestion, and generally offer a lower rate of complications.

2. “It Limits Cravings” – Dr. Feiz always reminds his patients that one of the biggest differences between the Lap Band and the gastric sleeve procedure is that the gastric sleeve provides the patient with added hormonal benefits. He explains that, when roughly 80 percent of the stomach is removed with the sleeve gastrectomy, the part of the stomach largely responsible for emitting much of the hunger hormone, known as ghrelin, is also removed. This means that, after the surgery, far less of this hormone reaches the brain every time the stomach is empty, significantly reducing cravings.

Dr. Feiz & Associates have helped countless patients send a variety of serious medical conditions into remission by losing weight with weight loss surgery. Any obese patients curious about weight loss surgery can call Dr. Feiz & Associates today at 310-855-8058 or visit the medical office online at http://www.DrFeiz.com today.

Coffee Trend That May Be Risky For Health

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your comments below…..

coffeeCoffee is associated with many health benefits, but too much caffeinated coffee may lead to insomnia, nervousness, heart palpitations, and the jitters.

French press coffee may be all the rage right now, but it comes with health risks, reports the May 2016 Harvard Health Letter.

Making pressed coffee involves mixing boiling water and coarsely ground coffee beans in a small pitcher, letting it steep for a few minutes, and then pressing a mesh plunger from the top of the pitcher to the bottom to strain the liquid and trap the coffee grounds.

Devotees say this type of coffee is more flavorful than coffee that’s filtered in an automatic drip coffeemaker. But is it healthier? “We don’t know; it’s never been studied that carefully, and it likely depends on the beans and the roasting process,” says Dr. Eric Rimm, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. What we do know is that too much unfiltered coffee may raise “bad” LDL cholesterol, because it contains certain harmful compounds that would otherwise be trapped by a filter.

Even filtered coffee comes with risks. Drinking too much caffeinated coffee may lead to insomnia, nervousness, heart palpitations, and the jitters. If any of those lead to getting less sleep every night, the risk of developing chronic conditions goes up.

Fortunately for coffee lovers, the savory brew is also associated with many health benefits when intake is limited to five cups or fewer per day, such as lower blood pressure, a slower rate of weight gain with age, and reduced risks for developing type 2 diabetes or dying from cardiovascular disease or neurological diseases.

Read the full-length article: “Coffee: Love it or leave it?”

Also in the May 2016 issue of the Harvard Health Letter:

* Hearing loss: Early warning signs that are easy to miss

* In search of comfortable shoes, despite foot problems

* The latest thinking on heartburn medications

The Harvard Health Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/health or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

How To Get Health Insurance When Traveling To Europe

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By Connor Christopher

healthyheartbpWhether your reasons for traveling to Europe are for business or for pleasure, you want your trip to run as smoothly as possible. Hopefully you won’t get ill or sick during your European adventures, but in the off chance you do, it’s best to be prepared for the worst but hope for the best. Make sure you renew your European Health Insurance Card today, because it’s better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.

Provided you’re a citizen of the European Union, you are entitled to an EHIC which entitles you to free or discounted medical treatment whenever you visit an EU country. The card entitles you to the same rights as the locals of that country, so if their medical care is free, then so is yours. Over 5 million EHIC’s are set to expire over the coming year, so if you already have one, make sure to check the expiry date before you set off on your travels.

The European Health Insurance Card is completely free, you just need to fill out a simple, online application or calling the NHS on 0300 330 1350, and it will be process and sent to you within days. The card is then valid for five years at a time but only covers one individual person, so if you have a child under 16, include them on your application and you’ll receive an EHIC for each of you.

While in Europe, the EHIC will cover treatment for chronic and per-existing medical conditions throughout the duration of your trip. Your EHIC must be presented when you require treatment, so make sure you carry it on your person at all times. The best way is to put the card in your bag or wallet as soon as you get it and then forget about it until you need it.

The EHIC is currently accepted by EU states Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Southern Cyprus, Czeck Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden, as well as non-EU countries Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

Bear in mind that while the European Health Insurance Card provides valuable protection, it is not a replacement for travel insurance. It is highly recommended that ensure you have both in order to reduce the large medical bills, delays in treatment and not to mention saving yourself a large deal of stress in the event of a medical emergency.

You will pay the exact same as an existing resident of the country you a visiting, so if they are expected to pay for their medical treatment, then you will be too.

If you’ve registered for you EHIC but the card doesn’t arrive before you’re set to leave on your European trip, then be sure to call the NHS Overseas Healthcare tea, and they’ll advise you what you need to do.

Health Club Attendance Is Increasing In 2016

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Zoom Active Lifestyle Marketing reports a 32 percent increase in its health club audience in Q1 compared to last year’s first-quarter.

exerciseballDespite the emergence of micro-gyms, and a stunning rise in obscure fitness trends, the traditional health club space is witnessing a boom in 2016, according to Nielsen-measured first-quarter data.

Zoom Active Lifestyle Marketing (“Zoom”), the exclusive ad, entertainment, and fitness content provider for 7 of the leading 11 U.S. health clubs, reports a 32 percent increase in its health club audience in Q1 compared to last year’s first-quarter.

The growth of Zoom’s audience reflects the overall prosperity of the health club industry. A Nielsen study conducted in February showed that monthly visits to participating health clubs increased by 2.5 million compared to last year.

This uptick in attendance has helped spur the growth of Zoom’s TV network, which registered 123 million impressions in February, according to a Nielsen-verified study. The Super Bowl, meanwhile, had a peak viewership of 116 million Americans, according to Nielsen ratings.

Beyond the spike in health club attendance, Zoom has been able to broaden its network by entering 579 new venues since the first-quarter of last year. With over 3,000 health clubs in 170 U.S. markets, the Zoom Network is a powerful platform displayed in America’s biggest health clubs, including 24 Hour Fitness, LA Fitness, Planet Fitness, Town Sports International, and Gold’s Gym.

The Zoom Network engages high-value influencers through Nielsen-measured TV, digital, mobile, and custom promotions. “Nielsen confirms that Zoom’s footprint in the health club space is deep and far-reaching. No other health club marketer reaches the active lifestyle consumer at this scale,” said Tom Link, senior executive vice president of sales and marketing at Zoom.

About Zoom Active Lifestyle Marketing

ZOOM Active Lifestyle Marketing is an international media and marketing company
with more than 4,400 digital media locations across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Zoom’s digital media networks are measured by The Nielsen Company in North America and reach over 25 million unique consumers. Zoom has offices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, London, and Manchester.

Stop Letting Bad Excuses Destroy Your Health

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By Katherine Smith

healthywordsThere are all kinds of reasons we give for why we settle for an unhealthy lifestyle. Here’s the thing: They’re all bad. Granted, healthy living is not as easy for some as it is for others. But it is absolutely essential for all.

Consider some of the reasons we give for not sticking to a healthy diet:

• Healthy food is more expensive

• Healthy choices are harder to find

• Healthy eating requires a lot of cooking

These all seem like excellent reasons until we end up with some kind of life-threatening disease which requires a drastic dietary change. Suddenly, the budget opens up for healthy eating. We discover where to find those healthier choices. And cooking becomes much less of a chore than it once was.

The same kind of thing is at play when it comes to proper exercise. We are convinced that our bad excuses are actually good reasons. Here are three of the most popular excuses, why they’re bad, and how you can overcome them:

I Can’t Afford It

Who said you need money to get fit? You can strap on the pair of running shoes you already have in your closet and hit the road to physical fitness before you are done reading this paragraph.

Spending money to achieve higher levels of fitness is always optional. But if you select one of the many options, such as a Fitness 19 gym, you will find plenty of affordable plans that cater to entire families.

You can spend as much or as little as you want. You can choose to take classes from professional instructors, or enjoy a more free-form use of facilities.

We tend to spend money on the things we consider important. If your life depended on a gym membership, you would find the money. It is just a matter of convincing yourself that your health is a budgetary priority. If a loved one were in your condition, you would find a way to pay for their treatment. You only need to love yourself equally as much.

Pain Is Holding Me Back

Regardless of your level of health, good exercise causes a certain amount of discomfort. This is especially true for muscle building. But not all exercise is about muscle building. No pain, no gain may be motivational to a certain type of Neanderthal. But it is scientific nonsense. Exercise doesn’t have to hurt.

Lifehacker points out…..

“This myth has been debunked by doctors, physical therapists, and researchers of all stripes, but it still persists because most people conflate the idea of pushing themselves to work out harder with pain.”

The desire to, and enjoyment of hurting one’s self is called masochism. It is a mental illness, not a useful, athletic trait. If exercise moves from challenging to painful, see your doctor. And get better exercises to do.

Exercise need not be at the level of a professional athlete to be useful. Expecting pain from exercise is the product of bad high-school coaching. Take your favorite NSAID such as Advil, and do the level of exercise you can achieve that does not include pain.

I Don’t Have Time

This is always the trump card that is supposed to end the discussion. It is also the worst of the bunch. You may think that a good exercise regimen takes a lot of time. But the Mayo Clinic begs to differ.

They say it takes about 75 minutes a week of vigorous exercise. That is less than 11 minutes a day. Strength training will cost you two sessions a week with no specific time limit. Whatever you can spare is fine.

How do you find the time? Set your alarm to go off eleven minutes earlier. Take one less detour to Starbucks. Split it up with two minutes here, three there, and so on.

At the end of the day, finding eleven minutes, or eleven dollars, or eleven pain-free exercises is not the problem, and never has been. It is always ever about prioritizing your health. It is either important to you, or it isn’t. Don’t let past failures stand in the way. One saying we all learned as children applies doubly as adults: If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.