Harvard Launches New Program For Educators

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

newsApplications are now being received for Books, Movies, and Civic Engagement, a professional education offering on campus at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, June 20 – 24, 2016.

The program will convene teachers, media specialists, school leaders, after-school program leaders, and others committed to using transmedia storytelling – telling a single story across multiple media platforms – to help young people engage with challenging cultural and social justice issues.

“It’s like a film festival for educators,” said Tonya Lewis Lee, who has joined the program faculty along with Nikki Silver, her Chief Co-Creator at ToniK Productions. The two will discuss their process and objectives in adapting The Watsons Go To Birmingham for television, along with their brand new project – a film adaptation of Walter Dean Meyers’ novel, Monster. Faculty will also explore transmedia opportunities for Fun Home and Hamilton, both currently very popular on Broadway.

The explosion of books across genres being adapted for the screen (e.g., biography, dystopia, historical fiction) has created exciting new opportunities to employ transmedia storytelling in support of student learning and development. Harvard Graduate School of Education Faculty Co-Chair Robert Selman explains that the program is designed to explore intertextuality, “a term that points to the way different sectors, genres, and media can all come together to promote and enrich storytelling…and build knowledge and sophistication.”

Activities will include plenary sessions, film screenings, and protocols for dialogic instruction — informal conversation between students and teachers to stimulate thinking and advance understanding. Participants will examine issues and stories that are relevant to today’s students in a variety of workshops and explore ways different content platforms can tell the same (or similar) stories.

Faculty co-chairs:

Joe Blatt, senior lecturer on education and faculty director, Technology, Innovation, and Education Program, HGSE Robert Selman, Roy Edward Larsen professor of education and human development, HGSE, and professor of psychology, Harvard Medical School.

Randy Testa, former vice president of education and professional development, Walden Media Tracy Elizabeth, doctoral candidate in Human Development and Education at HGSE.

BMCE is one of 50+ programs for K-12 teachers and school leaders offered annually, online and on campus, at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Additional program information and application details are available at: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/ppe/programs

Making Sense Of Drug Side Effects – January 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch

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doctorThe best way to understand drug side effects is to talk with a doctor or pharmacist. Older drugs generally have better information.

All drugs have effects. Some we want, others we don’t. The unwanted ones are known as side effects. The January 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch describes ways to limit or manage side effects.

The package insert that is supposed to give information about the potential side effects of a medication is likely to be more frustrating than helpful. Written in medicalese and printed in microscopic type, these inserts contain way too much information.
“Reading through scores and scores of side effects doesn’t help you sort out what is most likely to happen to you,” says Dr. Gordon Schiff, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He suggests forgetting the inserts and trying the following instead:

1. Ask for a drug that’s been on the market a while. The information on the side effects of a newly approved medication is often based on clinical trials involving, at most, a few thousand people. An older drug is likely to have been used by hundreds of thousands, even millions, of people. That experience can reveal additional side effects and give doctors an idea of which side effects are most common, which are most serious, and which might occur only after months or years of use.

2. Learn what to expect. For example, if nausea is a potential side effect, it’s important to know whether to keep taking the drug because the nausea will eventually go away or to stop taking it. For some drugs, like benzodiazepines or opiates, it’s important to understand the side effects of withdrawal and develop a plan for tapering off.

3. Ask for help. Not sure if a symptom is a drug side effect or something else? Talk with a doctor. Doctors generally know what side effects their patients have experienced, how severe they were, and how they can be managed.

Read other tips in the complete article: “Making sense of side effects”

Also in the January 2015 issue of the Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

* Seven health resolutions for 2015
* Be alert to pneumonia this winter
* Help for the winter blues
* Heel pain explained: What to do for plantar fasciitis

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Four Ways To Save On Prescription Drugs From Harvard Women’s Health Watch

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Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article from last months Harvard Women’s Health Watch, please share your thoughts in the comments section…..

pillsNavigating the annual health plan changes, figuring out insurance copays, and finding the pharmacy with the best buys can be daunting. Dealing with Medicare’s medication coverage gap, the so-called donut hole, adds to the challenge. Four basic strategies can help save money on medications, according to the November 2014 Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

Go for Generics – “Generics are just as good as brand-name drugs,” says Dr. Jerry Avorn, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and they are less expensive than brand-name drugs. Can’t find a generic version of a particular drug? A prescription for a generic in the same class of drugs may do nicely. For example, there isn’t a generic version of Crestor, a cholesterol-lowering statin. But there are five other generic statins that might work just fine.

Periodically re-evaluate drugs. Every year or so, dump all pill bottles in a paper bag—including over-the-counter medications and supplements. Ask a trusted doctor or pharmacist to review them. Some of the drugs may duplicate the actions of others, have harmful interactions with one another, or aren’t needed any more.

Forget about Vitamins, Minerals, and Supplements – These are almost always a waste of money, and can sometimes jeopardize health.

Compare Drug Prices – Different pharmacies pay different prices to manufacturers and wholesalers. They also use different systems to mark up drugs. That can lead to big differences from one pharmacy to another. Several websites make it easy to comparison shop for medications. But trying to get the best deal on each and every drug could mean losing the advantage of having a trusted and knowledgeable pharmacist. A compromise: fill prescriptions at the pharmacy with the best price for the costliest drug.

Read the full-length article: “Four easy ways to save on prescription drugs”

Also in the November 2014 Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

* How to tell if palpitations signal a heart problem

* Tips for exercising in cold weather

* What to do about stiff, painful hands

* Dealing with the holiday blues

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Bel Marra Health Reports On Harvard Study To Solve Food Addiction

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What are your opinions of this article provided by PRWeb? Can the brain be trained to like healthier foods? Please share your thoughts on this article written by Bel Marra Health.

garlictomatoBel Marra Health, who offers high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, is reporting on research that suggests a new way to tackle food addiction.

As Bel Marra Health reports in its article (http://www.belmarrahealth.com/brain-function/harvards-scientific-trick-healthy-food-becomes-irresistible/), a new study has found a way to train the brain to like healthy foods that some find less than palatable.

The study, conducted by Harvard Medical School and Tufts University and published in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes, has revealed that unhealthy foods like donuts and chips can be made less appealing to the brain while healthier food can be made more appealing.

The brain is “plastic” when it comes to food addiction. Circuits in the brain’s reward center can be completely reversed. That can mean good things for your health, if the new information is used properly.

“We don’t start out in life loving French fries and hating, for example, whole wheat pasta,” says senior author Susan Roberts, who teaches at Tufts’ Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

“This conditioning happens over time in response to eating – repeatedly – what is out there in the toxic food environment.”

Researchers looked at the brains of 13 overweight and obese men and women. Eight of the participants were enrolled in a six-month behavioral weight-loss program designed by Tufts University while the remaining participants were not. All participants underwent brain scans at the beginning and end of the program.

The researchers found those who followed the weight-loss program lost a significant amount of weight, 6 kg on average, while the others put on an average of 2 kg.

The first group also saw an increase in the activity of their brain’s reward center that was only activated as a response to seeing images of low-calorie healthy foods at the end of the program – and decreased activity in response to high-calorie foods.

Spokesperson for Bel Marra Health Dr. Victor Marchione says, “Food addiction is a very real concern. Make sure you notice the signs and take steps to make changes. Bad food habits can be hard to break the longer you hold onto them.”

A common sign you may be experiencing a food addiction is if you are using food to feel better, or as a reward for overcoming an emotional issue. Food addicts will need to break the cycle of “eating for reward” to overcome the addiction.

This study brings new hope to overweight individuals looking to break the cycle and establish good eating habits.

(SOURCE: Deckersbach T., et al., “Pilot randomized trial demonstrating reversal of obesity-related abnormalities in reward system responsivity to food cues with a behavioral intervention,” Sept. 2014; doi: 10.1038/nutd.2014.26.)

Bel Marra Health is the maker of Liver Rescue, a high-quality nutritional supplement to help support and maintain liver health. All ingredients are backed with scientific evidence. Every product is tested for safety, quality and purity at every stage of the manufacturing process.

Bel Marra Health products are produced only in Health Canada approved facilities to ensure our customers are getting top-quality products. For more information on Bel Marra Health visit http://www.belmarrahealth.com or call 1-866-531-0466.