Lose Weight And Feel Healthy By Cycling

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By Michael Peggs

BikingCycling is a fun and healthy exercise for all the family. Not only is it a great way to get everyone together and outside in the fresh air, away from their iPads, but it can also improve your family’s fitness, and help your children to lose weight and feel healthy. There are so many benefits to cycling but let’s start with the most important. As one of the easiest aerobic exercises, cycling burns a ton of calories and can help to combat obesity.

With nearly 78 million adults and 13 million children dealing with obesity problems every day in the US, this real health issue has been exacerbated by our sedentary lifestyles, computer games, processed foods and activities that replace physical exercise. While you may be no Martha Stewart in the kitchen and struggle to provide nutritious balanced meals for your kids every day, getting them on their bikes, even just two or three times a week, will be a great help. Nearly one in three kids in the US today is overweight or obese; don’t let yours be one of them.

Cycling also causes our hearts to beat steadily and improves overall cardiovascular fitness, which can decrease the risk of developing heart diseases by as much as a half. So, not only will you be helping your kids lose weight, but they will also be warding off potentially life threatening conditions later on. What’s more, while it’s rather an exaggeration to say that cycling will ensure your kids don’t smoke or drink later on, it may well be a deterrent, as the lung capacity needed for constant stamina on a bike is significantly affected by smoking and most people who cycle have a lower desire to smoke or drink.

Cycling is also a relatively cheap way of keeping your family fit. Once you buy the bike and the helmet, the cost of maintenance is very low and you don’t have to pay regular subscriptions. You also have the bike at your beck and call 24 hours a day and don’t have to fit in with a gym timetable or soccer practice dates. Fixies are currently hot right now and that’s good news for parents, as these fixed gear city bikes are inexpensive and provide endless customization possibilities that let your kids identify with their bike and give it a color and personality of its own.

Cycling to school instead of taking the bus, or instead of you having to drive them can also save you considerable money on bus fare or gas. If you want to set a good example for your kids, you can even think about cycling to work. Not only will you feel better and set a healthy pattern for your kids to follow but it will help you to lose weight and help save the environment in the process.

Last but not least, cycling can also make your children feel happier. The released endorphins from regular exercise, combined with being outside and enjoying nature will help them to study and sleep better, let off steam and be happier. So, the next time you see bikes for sale, just think about all the benefits you could be bringing yourself and your family.

– Michael Peggs is the founder of digital marketing agency Marccx Media, where they specialize in SEO and Content Marketing. Before Marcxx, Peggs worked at Google in business development, forming digital media and advertising partnerships. He is also a blogger and podcaster, hosting the iTunes Top 10 New & Noteworthy podcast You University – The Personal Branding Podcast.

Can You Feel Heart Disease? – Part 2

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By Kac Young ND, PhD, DCH

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

healthyheartSigns of Heart Failure (2)

Heart failure means the heart is not functioning as well as it should. Some early warning signs may include:

• Weight gain. If your heart starts to fail and fluid starts to build up in your tissue, causing edema, you might see a sudden weight gain.

• Frequent urination. Heart failure may cause decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which causes you to retain more fluid. One of the signs of this fluid may be frequent urination.

• Cataracts. Although the exact connection is not known, studies show that people who have cataracts are at higher risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

• Nighttime cough. “One of the signs of heart failure may be the build-up of fluid in the chest and heart when lying flat at night. This pressure can cause a nighttime cough.

These warning signs may have several different causes. They do not automatically mean you have, or will get, heart disease. But combined with other heart disease signs and symptoms, blood tests, and your family history, they provide your doctor with information to detect heart disease early on.

“Signs like ankle swelling or weight gain do not necessarily mean you have heart disease, but taken together with diagnosis of heart disease or heart failure,” says Carl E. Orringer, MD,(3) director of preventive cardiovascular medicine at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland.

The real message here is to pay attention. Don’t just assume that one condition is not related to a bigger issue. Chronic swelling may be an indication that you have inflammation present in your body. Inflammation that does not subside is a key factor in heart disease. Mention symptoms to your doctor so he or she can order the proper tests that may, in fact, save your life!

Reference:

(1) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

(2) Chris Iliades, MD

(3) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

Kac Young, a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. In the Heart Easy Cook Book sound nutritional advice is followed by family favorites that have been turned into heart healthy meals anyone can make and everyone will love.

Can You Feel Heart Disease? – Part 1

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By Kac Young ND, PhD, DCH

healthyheartThe short answer is: Yes. Obvious heart disease symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea, pain radiating down the arms, and sharp pain in the chest.
There are also other warning signs, that you can feel and observe that may point to heart disease. The sooner you get these checked out, the sooner you can rule out a heart attack that may take your life.

1. Swelling of the Feet and Lower Legs

Retention of fluid in the feet and legs is known as peripheral edema. You may notice “sock marks” on your lower legs at the end of the day. Edema may be a warning sign for heart failure. When your heart is not pumping well, fluid from inside your blood vessels can leak out into surrounding tissues. The legs and ankles are common locations for edema due to the power of gravity.

“Peripheral edema may be caused by a host of issues,” says Dr. Orringer. “The bottom line is that most people with peripheral edema do not have heart disease, but it could be an important sign if there are other warning signs or symptoms.” (1)

2. Male Pattern Baldness

Several large studies have confirmed the link between baldness and heart disease. Compared to men with a full head of hair, men with crown loss have an increased risk of heart disease of about 23 percent. Men with complete loss of hair on the top of their head have an increased risk of 36 percent.

Combine hair loss, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and you push the risk even higher.

3. Yellow Bumps on the Skin

Xanthomas are deposits of fat that build up under the skin. They may appear as small yellow bumps or as flat, wide plaques on your elbows, knees, hands, feet, or buttocks. A type of xanthoma called “xanthelasma palpebra” appears on the eyelids. These yellow, fat deposits can potentially be signs of heart disease because they may indicate high levels of fats in the blood.

4. Gum Disease

Swollen, sore, or bleeding gums are usually a sign of poor oral hygiene, but may also be an indication of heart disease.

Gum disease and heart disease are linked because they are both signs of poor circulation. Common bacteria can be involved in both gum disease and plaque build-up inside coronary arteries. The link may also have something to do with the body’s response to prolonged inflammation.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

Reference:

(1) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

(2) Chris Iliades, MD

(3) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

Kac Young, a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. In the Heart Easy Cook Book sound nutritional advice is followed by family favorites that have been turned into heart healthy meals anyone can make and everyone will love.

Why Might You Feel Guilty About Finding Health?

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By Dr. Natasha N. Deonarain

womanarmupHas there ever been a time in your life when you felt ashamed of who you were? What about feeling guilty? Propagation of feelings of guilt and shame, whether we realize it or not, play a significant role in the delivery of American healthcare. And unfortunately, it’s women who end up suffering the most.

How do feelings of guilt and shame emerge as we try to pursue optimal health?

First, let’s begin inside our doctor’s office. Say you have arrived there for a health check-up. What’s the first thing your doctor’s medical assistant will do? Likely, he or she will tell you to step on the scale and get weighed.

Stop right here for a moment.

Although your doctor uses your current weight to measure a BMI or to calculate drug dosages, what does the well accepted practice of stepping on a weigh scale do in terms of your ‘thought’ environment? In other words, what thoughts are most likely to emerge from this simple act?

Many of us are concerned about our weight these days. The actual number on the scale may make us feel embarrassed, especially as we have to get measured in front of a stranger who’s carrying a clipboard and pen, and is ready to write that number down.

saladplateWe all know that we “should” diet. We know that we “should” exercise. But as we try and stick to those promises day after day, week after week, we find that we’re only human and yes, we fail despite our best efforts.

Stepping on a scale often evokes a strong emotional response. I’ve even seen women turn around so they don’t have to look at the number, or flatly refuse to get weighed. I know they feel judged, embarrassed and possibly guilty. They know what we’re going to say as doctors: “Jane, you should diet and exercise.” And frankly, they just don’t want to hear it again. It doesn’t mean anything anymore.

In addition to the guilt trip about dieting and exercising, we get measured up against something called “normal.” And all of us seem to fail. Why is this?

Because there really isn’t such a thing as normal, is there? It’s a concept that our society has created to stuff us all into some box which really only serves to perpetuate feelings of guilt and shame. And when guilt and shame form the basis of a healthcare encounter, no amount of preaching by a doctor to “diet and exercise” will ever lead us to optimal health. Those words mean nothing when placed against feelings of guilt and shame.

What’s a better solution then, when many doctors will have trouble wrapping their heads around this idea that we should stop weighing healthy patients?

My solution is simple. If you want to find your way to health, don’t go to a doctor first. You heard right. Don’t begin in a doctor’s office if you want to find health. It doesn’t make any sense to start there.

Doctors have been trained for many years to find a disease. They have not been trained to encourage you in health practices, although they will adamantly insist they are the ones well-equipped to do that. What they will do immediately, is search for disease, any disease, right from the moment you walk in their office door. And when they haven’t found a disease after a battery of tests, they will declare that you are healthy simply because you don’t have a disease. This is backwards logic.

The absence of disease does not equal health.

The absence of disease does not equal health. And so, to begin by asking you to step on a scale and get measured against a non-existent “normal” only serves to keep you feeling judged, guilty or shameful about who you are. This will never, ever help you find your way to optimal health.

So begin here to know and love yourself. How can you do that?

In my next blog, I’ll tell you a few stories of people who were able to find health, lose weight, and look gorgeous…without even trying!

Shame and guilt are powerful deterrents to happiness.

Shame and guilt are powerful deterrents to happiness. They have been perpetuated in the delivery of healthcare, and have served only to keep our minds well separated from knowing and loving our bodies and spirits. Recognizing when shame and guilt play a role in our interactions with healthcare providers will help us develop the strength to find new pathways to self-empowerment, choice, and ultimately, optimal health through the pure joy of living well.

– Natasha N. Deonarain, MD, MBA is the author of The 7 Principles of Health: Your Call to Health Consciousness, now available on Amazon. She is the founder of the Health Conscious Movement and blogs at www.health-conscious.org.

Doctors Feel Unqualified To Treat Obesity

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From Your Health Journal…..”Today I found a great web site called EndoNurse, and I encourage all of you to visit this site to read the full article being reviewed here today, as well as some of their other incredible articles. The link below will take you there. The article discussed an interesting study which found that only 44 percent of primary care physicians reported success in helping obese patients lose weight and that primary care physicians identified nutritionists and dietitians as the most qualified providers to care for obese patients. This is such an interesting article, but I think most doctors can lead obese patients in the right direction if needed. The problem for the doctors is being consistent, as following up with obese patients on a regular basis could prove to be a task with a doctors busy schedule. Please, visit the EndoNurse page to read the full article.”

From the article…..

Your primary care physician may be your first choice for assistance with most health-related issues, but according a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, primary care physicians agree they may not be the best healthcare professionals to give weight related counseling. Researchers examined primary care physician perspectives on the causes of and solutions to obesity care and identified differences in these perspectives by number of years since completion of medical school.

They found that only 44 percent of primary care physicians reported success in helping obese patients lose weight and that primary care physicians identified nutritionists and dietitians as the most qualified providers to care for obese patients. The results are featured in the December 20, 2012 issue of BMJ Open.

“In order to begin improving obesity care, medical education should focus on enhancing those obesity-related skills primary care physicians feel most qualified to deliver, as well as changing the composition of health care teams and practice resources,” said Sara Bleich, PhD, lead author of the study and an assistant professor with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Health Policy and Management. “With respect to training and practice-based changes, primary care physicians would like to see implemented, 93 percent reported that including body mass index (BMI) as a fifth vital sign would be helpful; 89 percent reported that including diet and exercise tips in patients’ charts would be helpful; 85 percent reported that having scales that calculate BMI would be helpful and 69 percent reported that adding BMI to patients’ charts would be helpful.”

Bleich and colleagues conducted a national cross-sectional survey of 500 general practitioners, family practitioners and general internists between Feb. 9, 2011 and March 1, 2011. Researchers evaluated primary care physician perspective on the causes of obesity, competence in treating obese patients, perspectives on the health professional most qualified to help obese patients lose or maintain weight and solutions for improving obesity care.

To read the full article…..Click here