Best & Worst Exercise Equipment For People With Back Pain

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Thank you to PRWeb and Dr. Michael A. Gleiber, MD, FAAOS for supplying this article, please share your thoughts below…..

humanbodyMinimally invasive spine surgeon Dr. Michael A. Gleiber, MD, FAAOS has published a new article in which he lists the four kinds of exercise equipment that can help alleviate back pain and support recovery from a spine injury, and the three kinds of exercise equipment that people with back pain should definitely avoid.

Minimally invasive spine surgeon Dr. Michael A. Gleiber, MD, FAAOS has published a new article in which he lists the best and worst exercise equipment for people with back pain.

“Many people who suffer from back pain or have a spine injury believe that they must give up their gym membership,” commented Dr. Gleiber, who specializes in treating all spinal disorders including herniated discs, spinal stenosis, scoliosis, myelopathy, degenerative disc disease, spondylolisthesis, spinal trauma, and tumors and infections of the spine. “However, exercise can actually help alleviate their back pain and support their recovery — provided that they are using the right equipment in the right way, and steering well clear of the wrong equipment.”

According to Dr. Gleiber, the four kinds of exercise equipment he recommends for people suffering from back pain are:

1. Elliptical machines, which place minimal stress on the back and other joints.

2. Stationary bikes (both upright and recumbent), which provide an aerobic workout and strengthen the lower body, with little to no impact.

3. Treadmills, which are ideal for people who are out of shape, or resuming an exercise program after a lengthy break.

4. Weight machines, which can be particularly helpful for upper body exercises, and unlike free weights, do not require bending of the knee in order to lift the weight.

And on the other end of the spectrum, the three kinds of exercise equipment that people with back pain should definitely avoid are:

1. Lying leg press machines, which place enormous stress on the lower back.

2. Hip abductor machines, which strain the spine with each squeeze or pull.

3. Loaded standing calf raise machines, which place excessive weight on the shoulders and stress on the spine.

Added Dr. Gleiber: “Even when using this recommended equipment, people should immediately stop exercising if they experience additional back pain. And if they have any doubt about an exercise machine, they should check with their medical doctor – and not gym staff!”

The full version of Dr. Gleiber’s latest article entitled “The Best (and Worst) Exercise Equipment for Back Pain” is available on his practice’s website at http://michaelgleibermd.com/news/best-worst-exercise-equipment-back-pain/

Additional articles by Dr. Gleiber on spine health, pain relief, effective exercising and more are available at http://michaelgleibermd.com/news.

About Dr. Michael A. Gleiber, MD

– Dr. Michael A. Gleiber, MD is a trusted expert in the field of minimally invasive spine surgery. He currently serves as Spokesperson for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, is a writer for The Huffington Post, and is frequently invited to provide his medical expertise in the media. Dr. Gleiber has been honored with multiple recognitions, including Castle Connolly Top Doctors for Spine Surgery, SuperDoctors of South Florida, Top 10 Spine Surgical Specialists Florida by Vitals.com, and is listed amongst Top 50 Spine Surgeon Leaders. Learn more at http://michaelgleibermd.com

Let’s Play Initiative To Award $35,000 In Sports Equipment Grants

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boyssportsLet’s Play (Dr Pepper Snapple Group) and Good Sports are encouraging schools and nonprofit organizations to submit photos of their old, worn-out sports equipment for the chance to win grants for brand-new gear.

Let’s Play, a community partnership led by Dr Pepper Snapple Group, is teaming up with Good Sports to award $35,000 worth of new sports equipment to deserving organizations across the country through the Let’s Play Before and After Contest.

Now in its second year, the Let’s Play Before and After Contest is open for submissions through April 3, 2016. To participate in the contest, schools or nonprofits that serve youth and are in need of new sports equipment may upload a photo of their old, worn-out equipment to the Let’s Play Facebook page using the hashtag, #LetsPlayBeforeandAfter.

The organization’s name must be included in the submission as well as a short description of why new sports equipment is needed. At the end of the two-week submission period, entrants will be narrowed down to 10 finalists. Visitors to the Let’s Play Facebook page will be able to vote daily for one finalist from April 11 to April 17, 2016.

The organization with the most votes at the end of the voting period will receive a $20,000 grant of new sports equipment. Second place and third place will receive $10,000 and $5,000 sports equipment grants, respectively.

“There are so many organizations that struggle to sustain sports and active play programs because equipment runs its course and it’s often too expensive to replace. As part of our partnership with Good Sports, we are excited to offer the Let’s Play Before and After Contest as a way to get more kids back in the game each and every day,” said Vicki Draughn, vice president of corporate affairs at Dr Pepper Snapple Group.

Through its Let’s Play initiative, Dr Pepper Snapple has committed $3 million over three years to help Good Sports provide sports equipment to youth-serving organizations across the U.S.

Winners of the Let’s Play Before and After Contest will be officially notified by representatives from Dr Pepper Snapple Group and Good Sports following the conclusion of the contest on April 17, 2016. For full Official Rules, please visit http://www.letsplay.com/socialcontestrules.

Hospitals Super-Sizing Equipment For Obese Patients

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From Your Health Journal…..”A interesting article today from First Coast News called, Hospitals Super-Sizing Equipment For Obese Patients. This is one of those articles where I don’t know how to respond. It is an excellent written article with some great facts, but I am not sure if I should be happy or sad when I read it. First, it appears hospitals are re-creating themselves with equipment for the ‘larger’ patient, who may have had trouble before using equipment that possibly could not support them, whether a wheelchair, or a bed. This is great news, as it will help these patients a lot. What upsets me is there are so many patients who now need this type of equipment. Some doctors are even developing reputations for treating larger patients. They use longer needles to deliver injections into thicker arms or special surgical equipment that let the surgeon reach deeper inside a patient’s abdominal cavity. Please visit the First Coast News web site (link provided below) to view the complete article.”

From the article…..

Hospitals are getting super-sized.

Waiting room chairs are being built with wrought iron for heavy patients. Wheelchairs and beds are made to sustain extra weight. And toilets are being mounted to the floor, not the wall.

In response to America’s obesity epidemic, healthcare facilities nationwide are making accommodations to make sure they can take care of their heaviest patients.

The trend started about a decade ago when bariatric surgery took off in popularity and the American public began ballooning in weight. By the mid-2000s, hospitals had started to update with these patients in mind. That can mean anything from wider doorways to bigger commodes.

“It really runs the gamut,” said Cathy Denning, a vice president at Novation, a healthcare supply chain company that produces an annual report on the cost of bariatric care.

And they’re finding that those products have uses for other patients.

Vein viewers can locate veins in patients whose fat obscures their vascular access; they’re also useful in patients with difficult-to-find veins. Scanners need wide enough holes and strong enough tables to accommodate larger patients; patients with claustrophobia may also appreciate them.

Some doctors are developing reputations for treating larger patients. They use longer needles to deliver injections into thicker arms or special surgical equipment that let the surgeon reach deeper inside a patient’s abdominal cavity.

The average patient of Dr. Hubert Fornalik’s at St. Vincent Indianapolis has a body mass index of 38. Normal BMI is considered to be 18.5 to 24.9. That means a person who stands 5-foot-9 would weigh from 125 to 168 pounds.

Recently Fornalik, a gynecological surgeon, operated on a woman who had a BMI of 83 and weighed more than 400 pounds.

“We see more and more of those patients, and those patients are unfortunately bigger and bigger,” he said.

To read the full article…..Click here