Bel Marra Health Reports: Eating More Yogurt Helps Prevent Diabetes

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diabeteswordWhat are your thoughts about this article from Bel Marra and PRWeb? Please share in the comments section below…..

Bel Marra Health, a company that offers high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, is reporting on a new study that shows that eating dairy—yogurt in particular—is a good prevention strategy against diabetes.

As Bel Marra Health reports in its article (http://www.belmarrahealth.com/eating-more-of-this-will-help-prevent-diabetes/), enjoying a daily dose of yogurt can prevent or lower a person’s chances of developing diabetes.

As the article, “Eating more of this will help prevent diabetes,” details, a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health, with funding from the National Institutes of Health, has discovered a strong link between yogurt consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Researchers looked at data gathered from more than 193,000 Americans. Participants who were free from diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer completed lifestyle questionnaires every two years, responding to questions on habits and dairy intake. Those who consumed at least a 28 g serving (two tablespoons) of yogurt a day had an 18% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

By the end of the follow-up, 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes were spotted among those who did not consume yogurt on a daily basis. What’s more, those who consumed yogurt daily also received other benefits, such as calcium, vitamin D, and protein, all of which play a role in digestion and intestinal function.

The study did not clearly outline which type of yogurt is best, but Greek yogurt offers added protein, according to Dr. Victor Marchione, spokesperson for Bel Marra Health.

The American Diabetes Association estimates that 25.8 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes, with more than 10 million being adults age 65 and over. Statistics show Hispanics and African-Americans are more likely to have the disease than other ethnicities.

Worldwide, about 366 million have the disease; that number is expected to jump to 552 million by 2030. People with type 2 diabetes are also at greater risk of developing cardiovascular issues, such as stroke and coronary heart disease, says Dr. Marchione.

Dr. Marchione suggests incorporating more fermented milk products into one’s diet. He proposes using yogurt as a cooking and baking substitute for sour cream, for example, or serving it for a creamy dessert with a fresh fruit puree.

“Although Greek yogurt can be a little more expensive, it offers about double the protein of regular yogurt,” Dr. Marchione concludes. “It’s an excellent way to lower…risk of type 2 diabetes and get all the nutrient benefits of dairy.”

(SOURCE: Chen, M., et al., “Dairy consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: 3 cohorts of US adults and an updated meta-analysis,” Harvard University, November 2014, http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/215.)

Bel Marra Health is the maker of Gluco-Rescue, a high-quality nutritional supplement to help support and maintain blood sugar levels. All ingredients are backed with scientific evidence. Every product is tested for safety, quality and purity at every stage of the manufacturing process. Bel Marra Health products are produced only in Health Canada-approved facilities to ensure customers are getting top-quality products. For more information on Bel Marra Health, visit http://www.BelMarraHealth.com or call 1-866-531-0466.

Poll – “Grocery Gap” Is A Barrier To Healthy Eating

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..

healthycartA majority of those asked in Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota poll say not all Minnesotans have access to healthy food; lack of stores that offer healthy choices is an obstacle for many.

The path to affordable, healthy food is marked by significant barriers, according to a new poll commissioned by the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. A “grocery gap” is felt by many Minnesotans, with nearly half (49 percent) reporting that not having a store nearby that sells healthy food impacts what they eat. Most Minnesotans (73 percent) also say difficulty finding healthy food on-the-go influences their decisions.

While these challenges are widespread, there is a growing recognition that some people face more significant obstacles than others. A majority of those polled (56 percent) don’t believe that all Minnesotans have access to healthy food, regardless of where they live or their socioeconomic background, while 16 percent are unsure.

“Increasingly, Minnesotans acknowledge that not everyone has the same opportunity to make healthy choices, and that our surroundings have a significant impact on our overall health and wellbeing,” said Janelle Waldock, director of the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. “We hear a growing desire for more access to healthy food in Minnesota communities, schools and workplaces, but there are varying perspectives regarding who is responsible for making these positive changes a reality.”

Barriers Are More Pronounced in Some Areas

A marked decline in the number of grocery stores serving smaller communities, especially in Greater Minnesota, appears to be a contributing factor. Fifty-five percent of those who live outside the Twin Cities metropolitan area say their food choices are at least somewhat influenced by a lack of stores nearby that sell healthy food. While this is significantly more than in the metro area, 46 percent of those living within the Twin Cities metropolitan area also report similar challenges.

Minnesotans report shopping for food once a week or more at traditional grocery stores (66 percent), mass merchandisers (47 percent) and corner or convenience stores (19 percent). More than one-third (33 percent) say they must travel at least 10 minutes in order to shop at a full-service grocery store, including a proportionate number of seniors and lower-income households, where reliable transportation may also present a barrier. Longer travel times are also more prevalent in Greater Minnesota, where 40 percent report traveling at least 10 minutes to shop at a grocery store, and in rural areas, where trips of more than 30 minutes are reported.

“There isn’t a single answer for how to increase access,” said Waldock. “It really depends on the community context and all avenues need to be explored. This includes encouraging existing retailers to offer more healthy options, and supporting new businesses that want to open in underserved areas.”

Communities Seen as Part of the Solution

Minnesotans believe their communities should be part of a healthy solution. Nearly all of those surveyed (96 percent) say it is at least somewhat important for communities to increase access to affordable and healthy food, with 42 percent of respondents saying its “important” to increase access to healthy food.

More specifically, a majority of those polled say retailers (77 percent), individuals (73 percent) and schools (62 percent), are at least somewhat responsible for creating a healthier food environment, while others cite government (39 percent), nonprofits and social service agencies (27 percent), and employers (22 percent).

saladsSome efforts are already underway. The Minnesota Food Charter was created in 2014 by a broad-based group of Minnesota organizations, including the Minnesota Department of Health. The charter identified barriers to healthy food access and recommended policy and systems changes to help resolve them. Initiatives like those underway at Lakeshirts Inc. in Detroit Lakes, and the formation of a new food co-op in Milan, Minnesota, demonstrate the type of community-driven solutions the Food Charter encourages.

Based in Eagan, The Open Door provides healthy food through its food shelves and Mobile Pantry sites, as well as its Mobile Lunch Box program, which offers healthy lunches and activities for children and families when school is not in session. The organization’s Garden To Table® program promotes improved access to fresh produce by providing garden plots, vegetable and herb seeds, plants, tools and compost to food shelf clients at no cost.

“Improving the health of our communities – and of all Minnesotans – requires a multi-sector approach. The Minnesota Food Charter and other initiatives are an important part of this solution, but it will continue to require a broad-based effort to ensure that everyone in our state has the opportunity to choose healthy food and to live the healthiest life possible,” Waldock said.

About the Poll

The public-opinion poll was commissioned by The Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota and conducted online by ORC International’s CARAVAN® Geographic Omnibus in April and May 2015. It consisted of 1,000 respondents in Minnesota, ages 18 and older. The margin of error is +/-3.1 percentage points for the full sample.

About the Center for Prevention

The Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota delivers on Blue Cross’ long-term commitment to improve the health of all Minnesotans by tackling the leading root causes of preventable disease: tobacco use, lack of physical activity and unhealthy eating. Funded through proceeds from Blue Cross’ historic lawsuit against the tobacco industry, they collaborate with organizations statewide to increase health equity, transform communities and create a healthier state. Visit CenterforPreventionMN.com

About Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota (bluecrossmn.com), with headquarters in the St. Paul suburb of Eagan, was chartered in 1933 as Minnesota’s first health plan and continues to carry out its charter mission today as a health company: to promote a wider, more economical and timely availability of health services for the people of Minnesota. Blue Cross is a not-for-profit, taxable organization. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, headquartered in Chicago.

Skin Can Reflect Eating Habits

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saladplateA healthy diet does a body good inside and out, and dermatologists at Baylor College of Medicine say there is evidence that links certain foods to flares in acne.

“While there are definitely a number of triggers for acne, the connection between diet and acne is very interesting,” said Dr. Rajani Katta, professor of dermatology at Baylor. “Years back dermatologists thought the two were not linked, but now researchers say there is evidence for a link between sugar and carbohydrates and acne.”

Studies have shown that foods with a high glycemic index can affect breakouts.

“Foods high on the glycemic index, meaning foods high in refined carbohydrates such as sugar, cause fluctuations in blood glucose levels,” said Dr. Ramsey Markus, associate professor of dermatology at Baylor. ”As a result of the high blood sugar levels there is a cascade of hormones released that eventually stimulate the oil gland, leading to worsening of acne”.

High glycemic index foods include:

* White rice

* White bread

* White potatoes

One study placed participants on a low glycemic index diet for 12 weeks and during this time their acne did improve significantly, Katta said.

Other foods and factors can also aggravate acne.

“Dairy products, especially low fat milk, have been linked to acne,” Markus said. “Stress also is a big factor, as stress-related hormones trigger acne flares.”

The hormonal changes of puberty are a well-known trigger. Additionally, certain medications like lithium, medicinal steroids or anabolic steroids can lead to acne, he said.

Skin care products not designed for patients prone to acne may create a flare. Markus advises patients to look for key words such as oil-free or non-comedogenic in selecting suitable skin care products in patients who are acne prone.

Healthy Eating, Physical Activity To Child Care Providers

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For our readers in Minnesota. This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts in the comments section below…..

twokidsunFunding from Blue Cross provides certification to child care programs who go the extra mile to create healthy environments for the state’s youngest residents.

Getting Minnesotans off to a healthy start early in life is critical to their health in adulthood. So where better to begin such healthy activity than in the settings children spend much of their time: in early learning and care environments. With the help of the Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota (Blue Cross), Providers Choice – a leader in supporting child care professionals in serving healthy meals and snacks to children in these settings – has developed their unique Twist & Sprout initiative that child care providers can adopt to implement healthy foods and physical activity into their practices.

The research on healthy child behavior and the importance of early intervention, gives great support to the Twist & Sprout program, with data from the American Heart Association showing obese children as young as 3 will already show indications for developing heart disease in adulthood, and overweight children between the ages of 7 and 13 could develop heart disease as early as 25. Using such a unique program, early child care providers have the opportunity to both provide a healthy environment for children and educate parents on incorporating those healthy habits at home. The Twist & Sprout initiative supports child care providers through offerings like engaging, in-person workshops; seasonal menus with breakfasts, lunches and snacks that meet the Child and Adult Care Food Program standards; instructional videos led by a real chef; culinary skills refresher videos; and resources for parents.

“We know through the research that children who attend child care settings that participate in initiatives such as the USDA Food Program eat healthier than those who don’t, and that children who consume a healthy diet are sick less often, have more energy and fewer health problems,” said Janelle Waldock, director at the Center. “At the Center, we believe in the importance of providing children with healthy environments from a young age so they are ready to enter kindergarten, succeed in school, and in life. Twist & Sprout embodies that principle, which is why we are so proud to fund the Twist & Sprout initiative through Providers Choice.”

One of the most impactful parts of the program is the opportunity for child care programs to become Twist & Sprout Certified. The certification is awarded to child care providers who put best practices into action by creating a healthy environment for children in their care. To receive certification, providers have to meet a number of criteria, including the incorporation of healthy eating and physical activity into their care on a daily basis and having a written wellness policy. The certification allows child care providers to show off their skills and differentiate themselves from others, and also serves as a great tool for parents to make more informed decisions about where to send their children for care.

kidsunningtogether“Having the certification sets us apart from other child care options,” said Becky Gill, who offers child care services in Inver Grove Heights, a suburb of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area. “Parents know that their children are going to eat healthy, nutritious foods while they’re here, which makes it easier for parents to feed them that same food when they’re at home. We also keep them engaged with active play that helps create an overall healthy environment. We’re so proud to know that the children we care for will be healthier because they were here.”

Twist & Spout workshops are available across the state, and there are already 45 Twist & Sprout Certified child care providers who have demonstrated a commitment to safe and healthy eating policies as well as structured active play to help keep the next generation of Minnesotans healthy. To find a Twist & Sprout Certified provider, visit http://www.providerschoice.com and click on “Search for Child Care in Minnesota.” Twist & Sprout Certified providers have the Twist & Sprout logo next to their name.

About Providers Choice
Providers Choice supports child care professionals in serving healthy meals and snacks to the children in their care. As the largest nonprofit sponsor of the Child and Adult Care Food Program in the United States, we provide training, compliance monitoring and technical assistance to over 4,000 family child care providers and centers. Providers Choice is headquartered in the west metro of the Twin Cities and serves all 87 counties in Minnesota. To learn more about Providers Choice, visit their website at ProvidersChoice.com. To learn more about the Twist & Sprout program, visit ProvidersChoice.com/TwistandSprout.

About the Center for Prevention
The Center for Prevention at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota delivers on Blue Cross’ long-term commitment to improve the health of all Minnesotans by tackling the leading root causes of preventable disease: tobacco use, lack of physical activity and unhealthy eating. Funded through proceeds from Blue Cross’ historic lawsuit against the tobacco industry, we collaborate with organizations statewide to increase health equity, transform communities and create a healthier state. Visit CenterforPreventionMN.com for more information.

About Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota (bluecrossmn.com), with headquarters in the St. Paul suburb of Eagan, was chartered in 1933 as Minnesota’s first health plan and continues to carry out its charter mission today as a health company: to promote a wider, more economical and timely availability of health services for the people of Minnesota. Blue Cross is a not-for-profit, taxable organization. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, headquartered in Chicago.

6 Ways To Encourage Healthy Eating At Home

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By Bryn Huntpalmer

healthyheartIt’s a familiar 1950s sitcom scene: Mom and Dad sit at the table across from the family’s notoriously picky eater, in a dinnertime showdown that usually involves tears and and ultimately ends in an untouched plate of cold vegetables. It would be an understatement to say that kids don’t always have the healthiest taste in foods. The kitchen doesn’t have to be a battleground though, here are six ways to encourage healthy eating at home.

1. Persistence is Key
Children need to be exposed to a new food an average of 11 times before they will be used to it and willing to try it, so if your child doesn’t immediately grab for the broccoli, it doesn’t mean that he or she doesn’t like it and shouldn’t be served it, it may just mean they need more chances to become accustomed to it.

2. Try Something New
If you’ve already used up your tried and true veggies, remember that not everyone has the same tastes, and try something you may not usually cook for yourself. Just because you’re not a fan of asparagus, doesn’t mean your child will feel the same way.

Another way to try something new is a new preparation method. If you’ve done steamed veggies over and over again, look up some new recipes. Did you know that carrots can be glazed and grilled? Kale and broccoli can be coated in garlic and olive oil and baked. Also, various sauces can make veggies more palatable, not just to the kiddos but to the adults as well. Once your child decides they like a certain kind of veggie, you can use it in more recipes and figure out how to incorporate it more into the weekly menu.

3. Blend it up!
Even kids who say they hate veggies and won’t touch fruit will still sometimes eat them in certain forms. Whether blended into yogurt, frozen into fruit pops, chopped into sauce, or made into a smoothie, there are a lot of ways to make fruit and veggies more easily consumable.

You can make a very simple yet healthy fruit smoothie using whatever fruits you know your child will eat and full-fat yogurt. Once they’re used to drinking smoothies, you can start slowly adding in new, unobtrusive ingredients. Carrots blend very well into most smoothies, as do fresh tomatoes.

fruitswhite4. Hide the Healthy
If you keep hearing “I DON’T LIKE THAT!”, try hiding the fruit and veggies and don’t mention their existence to your picky eaters. If you put cooked spinach in a food processor it will be almost imperceptible in spaghetti sauce. In fact, there are entire cookbooks dedicated to recipes that will teach you to hide fruits and veggies in foods your kids will definitely eat, like brownies.

In addition, most kiddos won’t complain about the strawberries on strawberry shortcake, or the banana in a banana split. Adding peanut butter can be an effective way to get a child to try a fruit or veggie, and sometimes cream cheese can work wonders too. Obviously, you want you kids to learn to eventually love these healthy foods but if you have a picky toddler on your hands, it can be nice to rest assured that they are getting essential vitamins and nutrients even if they don’t know it.

5. Work Out a Rewards System
You’re probably thinking you aren’t willing to be so indulgent to your child’s whims, but before you get too judgmental, remember that even adults need rewards sometimes. How many times have we decided to stop off at the gym so we can have a guilt-free dessert after dinner?

Involve your child in the dinner decisions, and find out what veggie sides he or she is willing to eat. Let them know that there will be no dessert if they don’t eat the foods they’ve picked. That way, if there’s still untouched veggies on the plate at the end of the meal, you can at least sleep easy knowing you did worsen the issue by giving them a treat as well.

6. Get the Kids Involved
Kids like to help out in the kitchen, and they are much more likely to try something they helped prepare. Take your picky eater to the grocery store with you and have them help you pick out the meal. At dinner time, ask them to help you cook it, and watch with amazement as they actually take a bite without a fight! Even very young kids can help with tasks like mixing, measuring and sorting.

Better yet, grow your own fruits and veggies! You kids will be sure to show interest in vegetables that grew from seeds right in their own backyard. Plus they taste better and have more nutrients for the whole family.

For more tips and tricks, head to Modernize.com.

Partnership To Help Families Make Healthy Eating And Fitness Routine

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Thank you to PRWeb and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation for this article….please share your thoughts below…..

familyjogAlliance for a Healthier Generation and 24 Hour Fitness are joining forces to give families the power to live healthy, active lives. Through a partnership announced today, the Alliance and 24 Hour Fitness will launch Nutrition Revolution 5K, an event series in ten cities across the country that will educate and inspire children and adults to eat healthier and move more in 2015.

Nutrition Revolution 5K is an important part of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s mission to combat childhood obesity. Childhood obesity has almost tripled in children and adolescents in the past 30 years. Today about one out of three children and adolescents (ages 2-19) in the United States is overweight or obese, putting them at risk for serious health problems.

“Educating and inspiring kids and adults to develop lifelong, healthy habits is at the core of what we aim to do at the Alliance for a Healthier Generation,” says Dr. Howell Wechsler, CEO for the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. “We couldn’t think of a better partner than 24 Hour Fitness to join our team and launch this exciting new event series. Together, we will help families start a health revolution.”

For 24 Hour Fitness, Nutrition Revolution 5K provides another opportunity for people to get the most out of the physical activities they enjoy – and get more out of the rest of their busy days. Nutrition Revolution 5K will feature simple steps to make healthy eating and fitness a part of daily life – before, during and after the event series.

“24 Hour Fitness shares a vision with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation for healthy, active living that’s within everyone’s reach,” said John Tovar, Senior Vice President, Club Operations, 24 Hour Fitness USA, Inc. “We are proud to sponsor Nutrition Revolution 5K and show our commitment to families and members in the communities we serve.”

Learn more about how your family can join the revolution and make sure the finish line is only the start. Details on dates and locations for Nutrition Revolution 5K events will be posted on http://www.nutritionrevolution5K.org.

About the Alliance for a Healthier Generation

The Alliance for a Healthier Generation, founded by the American Heart Association and the Clinton Foundation, empowers kids to develop lifelong, healthy habits. The Alliance works with schools, companies, community organizations, healthcare professionals and families to build healthier environments for millions of children. To learn more and join the movement, visit HealthierGeneration.org.

About 24 Hour Fitness

Headquartered in San Ramon, Calif., 24 Hour Fitness is a leading health club industry pioneer, serving nearly 4 million members in more than 400 clubs across the U.S. For more than 30 years, the company has been dedicated to helping members change their lives and reach their individual fitness goals. With convenient club locations, personal training services, innovative group exercise classes and a variety of strength, cardio and functional training equipment, 24 Hour Fitness offers fitness solutions for everyone.

Please call 1-800-224-0240 or visit 24hourfitness.com for more information and to find the club nearest you.

4 Ways To Implement Smart Eating

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By Zaheen Nanji

saladheartsmallAnytime you change or improve your eating habits, you are on a diet? However, the word ‘diet’ has been overused in the media and has a negative connotation to it. Whenever, you eliminate a certain food or add nutritious food, you are changing your diet! That’s why we have dieticians! Instead of looking at this negatively, view this as a smart eating plan! In fact, let’s change the word ‘diet’ to ‘Smart Eating’. It’s not the normal way you used to eat, but is an unbalanced way of eating and this causes physiological and biochemical changes in the body which in turn could affect your mind and you experience different moods and feelings. A part of you will want to give in because it doesn’t like being in this state – it misses the ‘old’ you.

Here are 4 ways to implement smart eating, also called the POOP theory! That’s right, keep the POOP going so that you are better equipped:

1. Plan ahead

What makes you want to grab a quick bite to eat or eat out most of the time? One of the reasons is the lack of meal planning. I hear the following excuses:

“I don’t have time to cook”

“I don’t know what to cook”

I don’t like cooking for one person”

As a busy mother and entrepreneur, I don’t have time to cook everyday either. However, I make at least two to three meals on Sunday that lasts for a couple of days and I use the slow cooker frequently on other days. Another great idea is to pre-cook ground beef ahead of time and freeze up portions for those days when you need something quick to prepare.

2. Obstacle mastery

Life throws us curveballs. You will be faced with challenges and you will be stretched to your limits, but learning how to deal with these situations and emotions makes you resilient. So how do you master obstacles? Whenever you begin a lifestyle change or plan your meals to improve your relationship with food, look ahead to 4 weeks. Make note of any obstacles that could get in the way, for example a dinner party. Now find two ways you can overcome or embrace that obstacle so you are in control. How can you control the situation instead of the situation controlling you?

3. Outcome orientation

saladplatePeople who are successful at anything have the tendency to visualize the outcome and check in with their feelings before the action has even taken place. When a certain food or a restaurant menu is presented to a naturally thin people or people who have been successful at weight management, they will visualize how they will feel after eating a certain food and then decide whether to eat that food or not. This takes practice and replaces the notion of instant gratification.

4. Play with food

Unfortunately, some of us label ourselves as bad cooks and if you hold that belief, it will always be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Chefs love cooking because they like to play with their food and make creative concoctions. They look at a set of ingredients as an experiment and if doesn’t turn out to their liking they will keep trying. Use that same philosophy when you are in your kitchen. There are thousands of recipes on the internet and until last year, I didn’t know that I could make a cauliflower crust pizza – it was delicious!

If you dwell on what’s not working, you are attracting that very thing – something not working – and then what do most of us do – give up! Instead change this right now and turn it around into the attitude of self-care and self-alignment. Think about this unbalanced process of smart eating as way of your mind and body self-aligning. Your body and mind are going through a process of better nourishment and each needs to go through a ‘healing crisis’ before it can bounce back. It is difficult at first but if you don’t believe then you will never attract your ideal weight. You need to find what works for you and make consistent smart decisions – it took me 10 years to figure this out! Trust and believe in the process and yourself, create a smart affirmation to help you with your journey, learn about your body, become aware of your negative habits and take time to find effective strategies, and I promise you will attract your ideal weight.

– Zaheen Nanji is a resilience champion and teaches people how to embrace change and bounce back. She is also the author of an award-winning book, Attract Your Ideal Weight – 8 Secrets of People Who Lose Weight and Keep it Off. She can be reached at attractyouridealweight.com.

Bypassing Lags, Labels, And Ladling For Healthy Eating

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weightlossballtextThere’s no substitute for a good diet. Avoiding the unhealthy and favoring the healthy is the only sustainable solution for weight loss, energy, and overall better health. The eating public has understood this for decades now, and a large industry has grown up around the market for healthy foods. But because there was money to be made, not everything with a green package was quite as healthy as one might assume. Government regulations have attempted to rein in the worst offenders, but a new trick emerges every day.

In order to avoid being taken for a high-calorie ride by dated or confusing information, educate yourself as a consumer and use these lessons to make better food decisions.

The Lags: Go Straight To The Source For Current Info

Getting the facts about what’s available and what’s truly healthy for a transition to a better diet can be difficult. National media will tell you a quick rundown of recent trends, but their reports are quick summations and often lag many months behind. Besides that, they have many other topics to cover, even if they run regular features on health.

Before you give up your search for facts, think of the companies that are working in healthy foods. How do they know what their customers like and don’t like? How do they get an idea of what is next? The answer is Food & Beverage market research, which follows consumer trends and assimilates the data into a usable format. There’s no quicker or more direct way to find out what’s winning the healthy eater’s dollar.

The Labels: Check The Ingredients!

This is fundamental nutrition thinking. The health craze of the 1980’s sent many people directly to the salad line, happy to be favoring a vegetable-based meal rather than one centered on deep-fried something. In time, though, they discovered that the dressings and cheeses they were using to add flavor were also adding buckets of calories and fat grams, completely defeating the purpose of shunning the rib roast.

So after that, along came light dressings with a solution evidently in the offing. In time, consumers discovered that many were gorged with sodium, or that the bad dietary news was disguised with tiny portion sizes, which brings us to the next point:

The Ladling: When Is A Serving Not A Serving?

applescaleFrustrated with the gains they missed by glopping fatty dressings onto their iceberg lettuce, health-conscious consumers checked in on labels–and checked up on consumption. They quickly caught on that half as much of anything has half the calories, even with fatty foods.

But that step requires some kind of jumping-off point; I’m eating half as many calories, but just how many is that? Nutritional requirements mandate that packaging includes the calories, fat grams, and so forth of a serving of the food contained therein. The soda industry found this rather unpleasant, so rather than report a 375-calorie content in a 20-ounce bottle of soda, they labeled those bottles as 2.5-serving units, getting the calories down to 150. Never mind the fact that no one ever drinks 40% of a 20-ounce bottle; that was what the industry went with.

So apart from the nutritional profile per serving, you should always be alert to the number of servings you’re consuming as well. Then be sure to multiply and get the correct profile of what’s going into your body.

The food industry is complicated. Trying to create products that satisfy a wide array of consumers gives many conflicting signals. As a result, there will always be higher-calorie, higher-fat, and higher-sodium offerings out there. That puts the burden on the eater to determine what’s best for their particular needs.

Intuitive Eating Brings Freedom From Food Worry – Part 2

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By: Bonnie R. Giller, MS, RD, CDN, CDE

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

healthychoiceAs an alternative of the diet mentality, Intuitive Eating encourages you to challenge your negative thoughts about food. Instead of labeling food as good or bad or declaring yourself as having a good day or a bad day with regard to calories consumed, this approach tells you it is okay to eat. Unhealthy labels and negative perceptions of food result in viewing food as an adversary that is no longer to be trusted. Perceiving food as negative is an unhealthy approach to maintaining health. Food is the fuel for your body, it’s what keeps you healthy and you cannot live without it.

Furthermore, as long as you are attuned to the signs of your body and are able to recognize your triggers, Intuitive Eating encourages you to go ahead and eat that piece of chocolate cake. The philosophy behind this is that if you restrict yourself from moderate indulgences, you end up developing feelings of deprivation and intense cravings. Resentment builds as a result of these feelings and you end up overindulging and overeating. Therefore, it is better to engage in these simple pleasures in moderation.

Honoring your hunger, respecting your fullness and discovering the satisfaction factor are additional principles focused on physiological eating triggers and the overall experience of eating. Honoring your hunger and respecting your fullness require you to tune into the signs of your body by rating your hunger and satiety on numerical scales. By scaling your hunger and fullness, you are then directed by physiological cues as to when to start and stop eating. Discovering the satisfaction factor involves tuning into the enjoyment of food through environmental, social, psychological and sensory aspects.

Intuitive Eating encourages respecting your body and honoring your health. With these principles you learn to modify your self-perception to a more realistic view, and recognize that your genetic makeup plays a key role in your body shape and composition. Honoring your health encourages a consistent progression to improved health by guiding you to healthy meal options.

saladplateIntuitive Eating fosters making peace with food and ditching labeling food as good or bad. This approach helps to create a healthy relationship with your food, mind and body. The benefits of this approach are achieved through exploring how you got to where you are today, as well as providing nutrition education and support.

Learning and practicing Intuitive Eating will not only keep you healthy throughout the year, but will also put you on the path to improved health and wellness for the rest of your life. You’ll experience increased energy levels, weight loss or maintenance, and an overall sense of peace with food. You will finally be able to stop making New Year’s Resolutions.

– Bonnie R. Giller helps chronic dieters break free of the pain of dieting and get the healthy body they love. She does this by creating a tailored solution that combines three essential ingredients: a healthy non-diet mindset, nutrition education and caring support. She utilizes the principles of intuitive eating, which is eating based on your internal signals of hunger and satiety versus situations or emotions. The result is they lose weight, keep it off without dieting and live a healthy life of guilt-free eating. Bonnie is a Registered Dietitian (R.D.), Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist (CDN) and Certified Diabetes Educator (C.D.E.). She is also a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. Bonnie is the author of an e-book titled 5 Steps to a Body You Love without Dieting. Get your copy Free and learn more about Intuitive Eating at brghealth.com.

Intuitive Eating Brings Freedom From Food Worry – Part 1

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By: Bonnie R. Giller, MS, RD, CDN, CDE

http://yourhealthjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kickhabit.jpgHave you planned out what you will accomplish this year? Many people look at a new year as a new beginning or an opportunity to start over. They tend to create goals at the beginning of the year known as New Year’s resolutions. More often than not these resolutions are built around improving health through diet and weight loss. While you may have the best of intentions, somehow life happens and you often find yourself going back to your old ways. Making too many changes at once can cause you to burn out and break your commitment within the first few months of the year.

Instead of making temporary resolutions, let’s try a different approach; adopt the belief that it’s always the right time to make healthy, life changing goals. As an alternative to changing your entire way of living all at once, try making small changes every day. Slowly work your way to a healthier you. One of the ways you can do this is by learning about and applying the Intuitive Eating approach to your life.

Intuitive Eating is an approach that has emerged in recent years. It is not a diet or a meal plan. Instead it encourages you to tune into what is going on in your body and mind. It encourages you to become aware of your emotional, psychological and physiological motivations to eat. By engaging in intuitive eating, you are better able to balance what you eat, the way you eat and why you eat.

Intuitive Eating encompasses ten principles. These principles will put you on the path to regaining control of your health, rebuilding trust in yourself and your body, and eventually achieving weight loss.

weightlossballtextThe first principle of Intuitive Eating is rejecting the diet mentality. The diet mentality fosters unhealthy restrictive behavior that can result in adverse health effects. Chronic dieters often cannot recognize hunger or fullness signals, which can result in overeating and weight gain. Chronic dieting can also lead to negative body composition changes, hormonal defects, reduced bone density, and menstrual disturbances. Additionally, chronic dieting can potentially trigger eating disorders, such as anorexia or bulimia. In order to avoid or reverse the destruction of chronic dieting, it is important to work towards letting go of the diet mentality and move toward a more fulfilling and health promoting approach to eating.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Bonnie R. Giller helps chronic dieters break free of the pain of dieting and get the healthy body they love. She does this by creating a tailored solution that combines three essential ingredients: a healthy non-diet mindset, nutrition education and caring support. She utilizes the principles of intuitive eating, which is eating based on your internal signals of hunger and satiety versus situations or emotions. The result is they lose weight, keep it off without dieting and live a healthy life of guilt-free eating. Bonnie is a Registered Dietitian (R.D.), Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist (CDN) and Certified Diabetes Educator (C.D.E.). She is also a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. Bonnie is the author of an e-book titled 5 Steps to a Body You Love without Dieting. Get your copy Free and learn more about Intuitive Eating at brghealth.com.