New Drug Found To Cure Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article. What are your thoughts on these findings and reports, please share in the comments section below…..

newsBeverly Hills rheumatologist Dr. Susan Baker comments on a new drug trial that could revolutionize treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis for patients.

The findings from a promising drug study for treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis in mice is set for human trials this year. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the researchers, lead by Teresa Hemmerle of the federal technology institute ETH Zurich in Switzerland, discovered a compound that cleared the affected mice of their symptoms.

Using one of the body’s own immune cells, interleukin 4 (IL-4), and fusing it with an antibody found in certain disease specific inflamed tissue and tumors, the researchers found that the combination of the two elements used together completely eradicated the arthritis induced swelling and inflammation in the toes and paws of the affected mice within days.

“The implications for human uses of this study are very exciting,” said Dr. Susan A. Baker, a rheumatologist in Beverly Hills. “The treatment for Rheumatoid arthritis up to this point has mainly focused on managing pain and slowing long term joint damage and deterioration for as long as possible. The potential for a drug with curative effects would be a watershed moment in the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Rheumatoid Arthritis, an autoimmune disorder that causes painful swelling and inflammation in the joints and can lead to long term joint damage and deterioration currently does not have a cure. While the trajectory between human trials and the availability of a cure can be long and complicated, the researchers are very hopeful that their findings will lead to a viable treatment option for humans down the line.

“Any research or new information that can enhance our treatment options for patients is always a welcome addition,” added Dr. Baker.

The researchers found that when used separately, the components worked to slow the progression of the RA symptoms in the mice, but it was the combination of the two that produced the breakthrough results.

Board certified in both internal medicine and rheumatology, Dr. Baker has been practicing medicine in Beverly Hills since 2003. In addition to her primary practice, she holds teaching position at Cedars Sinai Hospital. and is a clinical instructor of medicine for UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine. Dr. Baker has been recieved numerous awards including the “Patient’s Choice Award” and the “Most Compassionate Doctor” award.

To contact Susan A. Baker MD, Rheumatology & Internal Medicine please visit http://susanbakermd.com/, or call (310) 274–7770.

Making Sense Of Drug Side Effects – January 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch

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doctorThe best way to understand drug side effects is to talk with a doctor or pharmacist. Older drugs generally have better information.

All drugs have effects. Some we want, others we don’t. The unwanted ones are known as side effects. The January 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch describes ways to limit or manage side effects.

The package insert that is supposed to give information about the potential side effects of a medication is likely to be more frustrating than helpful. Written in medicalese and printed in microscopic type, these inserts contain way too much information.
“Reading through scores and scores of side effects doesn’t help you sort out what is most likely to happen to you,” says Dr. Gordon Schiff, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He suggests forgetting the inserts and trying the following instead:

1. Ask for a drug that’s been on the market a while. The information on the side effects of a newly approved medication is often based on clinical trials involving, at most, a few thousand people. An older drug is likely to have been used by hundreds of thousands, even millions, of people. That experience can reveal additional side effects and give doctors an idea of which side effects are most common, which are most serious, and which might occur only after months or years of use.

2. Learn what to expect. For example, if nausea is a potential side effect, it’s important to know whether to keep taking the drug because the nausea will eventually go away or to stop taking it. For some drugs, like benzodiazepines or opiates, it’s important to understand the side effects of withdrawal and develop a plan for tapering off.

3. Ask for help. Not sure if a symptom is a drug side effect or something else? Talk with a doctor. Doctors generally know what side effects their patients have experienced, how severe they were, and how they can be managed.

Read other tips in the complete article: “Making sense of side effects”

Also in the January 2015 issue of the Harvard Women’s Health Watch:

* Seven health resolutions for 2015
* Be alert to pneumonia this winter
* Help for the winter blues
* Heel pain explained: What to do for plantar fasciitis

Harvard Women’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/womens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Is Soda A Drug? A Nutritionist’s Perspective – Part 2

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By Christie Korth, CHC

Continued from part 1 of the article…..

soda* 45 minutes: Your body ups your dopamine production stimulating the pleasure centers of your brain. This is physically the same way heroin works, by the way.

* 60 Minutes: The phosphoric acid binds calcium, magnesium and zinc in your lower intestine, providing a further boost in metabolism. This is compounded by high doses of sugar and artificial sweeteners also increasing the urinary excretion of calcium.

* 60 Minutes: The caffeine’s diuretic properties come into play. It is now assured that you’ll evacuate the bonded calcium, magnesium and zinc that were headed to your bones as well as sodium, electrolytes and water. Not only is the soda an “empty” simple carbohydrate, it robs your body of many other essential vitamins and minerals, as well.

* 60 Minutes: Pay attention to your bladder, by now it is almost certain you have had to urinate as a result of your kidneys trying to excrete this mystery substance as soon as possible. When your body does not recognize a substance, it is very quick to send the appropriate signals to your body to digest rapidly. This is viewed as a state of emergency. It is as if the body is saying to your brain, “Help-Get this out of here fast-it’s doing us not good at all and it’s invading our nutrition supply!” Hence the need to use the bathroom an hour after soda consumption. While you were in the bathroom, you have now lost all of the water that was in the Soda. Sadly, not before infusing it with valuable nutrients your body could have used for vital functions. Such as maintaining the ability to hydrate ones system or build strong bones and teeth. This is how soda drinking can lead to osteoporosis. The phosphates in the soda leech the calcium out of your blood and bones.

* After the fiasco in the bathroom, you will surely be overjoyed to learn that this will all be followed by a caffeine crash in the next few hours. (An added bonus: Count on the caffeine crash to occur in as little as two hours or less if you’re a smoker.) But, hey, have another Soda; it’ll make you feel better. And so another ride sugar on the sugar highway begins.

3 Quick Tips for Avoiding A Ride on The Soda Highway:

1. Drink plenty of water. If water is your beverage of choice, after awhile, you will stop craving sugary drinks. If you can replace one cup of soda per day with a cup of water you have the right idea. Over time, this will allow you to quit or cut down on your soda consumption.

2. Make a Pact: Make your own soda. If you want soda, only allow yourself to have it if you allow yourself to make it. For example, try club soda, with agave nectar, fresh lemon and lime juice and presto: you have made your own Sprite. Don’t love Sprite? Try sparkling seltzer with fruit juice for a fruity soda.

3. Occasionally treat yourself to organic soda. Stop buying soda at home and have it only at special occasions. Make sure everyone in your house adheres to this rule, so there is no cheating. Watch how much your consumption dwindles when you stop purchasing it!

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Is Soda A Drug? A Nutritionist’s Perspective – Part 1

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By Christie Korth, CHC

sodabottleHello everyone! I’m Christie Korth your favorite, fun-loving holistic nutrition expert, author, and founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling. My mission today is to permanently change your relationship with soda. Why is your relationship with soda so important? We know Coca Cola took the cocaine out of Soda almost a hundred years ago, but surprisingly, as far as your body can tell….not too much has changed. Confused? Take a look to see how your body reacts to America’s most consumed beverage and how the reaction is similar in the way your body reacts to one of the most addictive, deadly drugs….

Have you ever wondered why Soda comes with a smile? It’s because it gets you high. Yes, in 2013, despite the absence of cocaine, soda junkies everywhere are unsuspectingly subjecting themselves to a “high”. By simply drinking what is known as a staple beverage in the Standard American Diet (or SAD, as I prefer to call it) we are playing a deadly game of Russian Rulet with our health and exposing ourselves to diseases the more that we indulge in this commodity.

By now, I am sure you are wondering what I am talking about. What is the good old culprit responsible for these highs? It’s none other than….Sugar! But- this is not just any old sugar that we are talking about here. It is the mother of all sugars…high fructose corn syrup! I suppose the good folks at Coke figured, why not try something cheaper, and perhaps switch to a substance that was obviously not illegal. And so voila, after near 100 years of consumption, we have an alarming rate of childhood and adolescent onset diabetes, hypoglycemia, obesity, digestive disorders, skin conditions, osteoporosis, candida, cancer. These conditions are all linked to access sugar consumption. If you are an avid soda drinker, your life depends on this. Please read on.

Every day, millions of Americans reach for a coke, some in hopes of curing that three o’clock lull one may experience after lunch when their energy levels feel zapped, while others have reported routinely drinking up to three liters per day! More alarmingly, children drink these beverages in school and at home.

A child’s body is no match for the sugar rush that soda produces. This seemingly innocent little routine has taken most of the public by storm, sending people down the Diabetes-Hypoglycemia Highway at full speed. The end result riding down the sugar highway is devastation in one’s health, yet the beverage companies continue to receive advertising grants in the form of government funding toppling in the billions. Meanwhile, health promoting advertisements, such as the FDA’s Healthy Food Pyramids slogan for “5 A Day” (signifying that one should consume a combination of five fresh fruits and vegetables a day.) received little or no media attention. No wonder the public is in the dark. Everyone has been brainwashed by advertisements to eat a food we know is not healthy.

What Happens To Your Body When You Drink A Soda?

* In The First 10 minutes: 10 teaspoons of sugar hit your system. (100% of your recommended daily intake by the FDA) You don’t immediately vomit from the overwhelming sweetness because phosphoric acid cuts the flavor allowing you to keep it down. Clever trick by the scientists that make soda! Insert twilight zone music here: “do-do do-do do-do do-do”…I believe my food should made by a chef or purchased from an organic farmer-not scientists. Chemicals are not food. This is common sense that is often overlooked.

* 20 minutes: Your blood sugar spikes, causing an insulin burst. Your liver responds to this by turning any sugar it can get its hands on into fat. (There’s plenty of that at this particular moment)

* 40 minutes: Caffeine absorption is complete. Your pupils dilate, your blood pressure rises, as a response your livers dumps more sugar into your bloodstream. The adenosine receptors in your brain are now blocked preventing drowsiness. Here comes your sugar high!

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article…..

Christie Korth is a Crohn’s disease survivor, author, certified health coach and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn’s disease. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, she then went on to be the founder and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz’s Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine. Christie is he author of The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book: A Guide to Releive Crohn’s and Colitis with Whole Foods. Christie lives in New York with her son, her husband, and her cat.

Adult Diabetes Drug Helps Severely Obese Youths Lose Weight

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exerciseFrom Your Health Journal…..”A very interesting article today from one of my favorite site to promote called NewsMax Health called Adult Diabetes Drug Helps Severely Obese Youths Lose Weight. A drug that was originally approved to treat and help adults with diabetes could possibly also help severely obese youths lose some weight. The researchers of this study state there are few treatments available for severely obese children outside of lifestyle changes and surgery, and they wanted to see if the weight loss seen in adults would also happen in children with a drug called Exenatide. Between 4 and 6 percent of American teens and children under 18 years of age are severely obese. Severe obesity in children is classified as a body mass index (BMI), a measurement of weight in relation to height, of 35 or more on the adult scale. That’s the BMI of a 12-year-old girl who is five feet tall and 155 pounds. BMI is not 100% accurate, but is just an indication of whether someones weight falls within a healthy range. Please visit the NewsMax web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It will be interesting to see if this will be approved sometime in the future for obese children to lose weight. Right now, the doctors in the study do not recommend usage by children to lose weight.”

From the article…..

A drug originally approved to treat adults with diabetes may also help severely obese youths lose some weight, according to a new study.

“We’re encouraged by these trial results because there is potentially a role for this class (of drugs) to be useful in terms of weight reduction and cardiovascular risk control,” said Aaron Kelly, the study’s lead author from the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis.

Exenatide, which is marketed by Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc. as Byetta, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2005 to boost production of the hormone insulin in adults with Type 2 diabetes. People with the disease do not produce enough of the hormone, or their body is resistant to it.

The drug, which is injected in a person’s belly twice a day and costs about $2,000 per year, was also found to reduce body weight by slowing down how quickly food moves through the body, which gives a person the feeling of being fuller longer.

The researchers write that there are few treatments available for severely obese children outside of lifestyle changes and surgery, and they wanted to see if the weight loss seen in adults would also happen in children.

For the new study, Kelly, who also works at Amplatz Children’s Hospital, and his colleagues recruited severely obese participants between 12 and 19 years old from around Minnesota, and separated them into two groups.

Between 4 percent and 6 percent of American youths under 18 years of age are severely obese, according to the authors, who published their study in JAMA Pediatrics on Monday.

Severe obesity in children is classified as a body mass index (BMI), a measurement of weight in relation to height, of 35 or more on the adult scale. That’s the BMI of a 12-year-old girl who is five feet tall and 155 pounds.

To read the complete article…..Click here

Diabetes Drug Metformin Finally Understood – Leading To Potential New Diabetes Drugs

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By Philip Tucker

diabetesglucoseWhen it comes to reporting on diabetes the news has been almost unrelentingly grim. The number of people with type-2 diabetes has skyrocketed across the globe, and while a better understanding of how diabetes works has led to extended life spans, the mortality rate is also rising. Which is why an article rather cryptically entitled, Biguanides suppress hepatic glucagon signalling by decreasing production of cyclic AMP is such good news – at long last scientists have deciphered the way in which metformin controls the levels of blood sugar in diabetic patients – and opened new potential pathways to developing even better treatments.

One of the most serious challenges facing diabetics is controlling their levels of blood sugar. Overactive glucose production in the liver can lead to serious health problems, as diabetic patients are unable to produce enough insulin to keep this process in check. This is where metformin came in. It lowered the production of liver produced glucose, but nobody quite understood why.

For awhile it was theorized that metformin reduced glucose production by activating an enzyme called AMPK, but this theory was demolished when Nature published a study showing that genetic manipulated mice who had no AMPK still responded to metformin. Enter senior author Morris J. Birnbaum, MD, PhD and Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor of Medicine. Along with his team from the Perelman School of Medicine, they have found through research on mice that metformin works by actually suppressing the liver hormone glucagon’s ability to generate an essential signaling molecule.

Glucagon is a hormone secreted by the pancreas which raises blood sugar levels.

Glucagon is a hormone secreted by the pancreas which raises blood sugar levels. Think of it as the anti-insulin; it does exactly the opposite job. Glucagon causes the liver to release glucose, and it is exactly this process that Dr. Birnbaum and his team discovered that metformin interrupted. Metformin causes the accumulation of AMP in mice, which prevents the signaling peptide adenylate cyclase from acting, reducing cyclic AMP and protein kinase activity, which eventually blocks the production of glucose.

Why are these details important? Because metformin is like a sledgehammer, and causes a wide array of side effects in those who take it, like affecting the mitochondria in cells, impeding their ability to make energy. Our new understanding of how it acts on glucagon could now allow us to take a shortcut and target adenylate cyclase directly, making for a more specific drug that could cut out many if not all of metformin’s side effects—and perhaps even work for those patients on whom metformin has no effect at all.

– Phil Tucker is a sports enthusiast and blogger. Check out his blog to learn more, or visit his site!