Southern Diet Linked To Death In Those With Kidney Disease

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newsEating a Southern-style diet results in higher death rates in those with kidney disease, according to research published in the August issue of the National Kidney Foundation’s American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

“This is the first study to identify a regionally specific diet pattern that is highly associated with adverse outcomes among persons with kidney disease,” said lead author Orlando Gutiérrez, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “It’s well known that the Southern region has poor health outcomes in a number of different areas including stroke, heart disease and sepsis, and that the style of diet plays a role.”

According to the National Kidney Foundation, modifying lifestyle through healthy diet as well as controlling blood pressure and blood sugar, quitting smoking, regular exercise and maintaining a normal weight, can reduce the risk of kidney disease and related conditions.

Using the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, the research team identified 3,972 participants who had stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease, but had not started dialysis. They then analyzed dietary patterns in those individuals. Those who primarily ate a cuisine of processed and fried foods, organ meats and sweetened beverages, items popular in Southern diets, had a 50% increase in risk of death over a 6.5-year follow-up period.

While many studies have looked at individual nutrients such as sodium or potassium and their effect on longevity in kidney patients, this study focused on dietary patterns.

“People don’t eat nutrients in isolation,” said Thomas Manley, director of scientific activities, National Kidney Foundation. “This study suggests that those caring for people with kidney disease should be focusing on patterns of eating and reducing processed foods and saturated fat, rather than on individual minerals and nutrients. It’s the overall patterns that are strongly associated with adverse outcomes.”

Surprising Results

The same study showed that while a healthy diet alone — comprised primarily of whole foods, fruits and vegetables – was associated with improved survival, it had no protective benefit when it came to progression to kidney failure.

“This doesn’t mean that eating a healthy diet doesn’t help, but it suggests that healthy lifestyle overall — not smoking, exercising and eating right — the combination of these things is more important for kidney health,” Dr. Gutiérrez said.

Kidney Disease Facts from the National Kidney Foundation

· 1 in 3 American adults is at high risk for developing kidney disease today. The risk increases to 1 in 2 over the course of a lifetime.

· High blood pressure, diabetes, a family history of kidney failure and being over 60 are major risk factors for developing kidney disease.

· 1 in 9 American adults has kidney disease — and most don’t know it.

· Early detection and treatment can slow or prevent the progression of kidney disease.

· Kidney disease risk can be reduced by controlling blood pressure and blood sugar, quitting smoking, regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding excessive use of pain medications.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk. For more information, visit kidney.org.

– Submitted by Ellie Schlam of the NKF.

Can You Feel Heart Disease? – Part 2

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By Kac Young ND, PhD, DCH

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

healthyheartSigns of Heart Failure (2)

Heart failure means the heart is not functioning as well as it should. Some early warning signs may include:

• Weight gain. If your heart starts to fail and fluid starts to build up in your tissue, causing edema, you might see a sudden weight gain.

• Frequent urination. Heart failure may cause decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which causes you to retain more fluid. One of the signs of this fluid may be frequent urination.

• Cataracts. Although the exact connection is not known, studies show that people who have cataracts are at higher risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

• Nighttime cough. “One of the signs of heart failure may be the build-up of fluid in the chest and heart when lying flat at night. This pressure can cause a nighttime cough.

These warning signs may have several different causes. They do not automatically mean you have, or will get, heart disease. But combined with other heart disease signs and symptoms, blood tests, and your family history, they provide your doctor with information to detect heart disease early on.

“Signs like ankle swelling or weight gain do not necessarily mean you have heart disease, but taken together with diagnosis of heart disease or heart failure,” says Carl E. Orringer, MD,(3) director of preventive cardiovascular medicine at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland.

The real message here is to pay attention. Don’t just assume that one condition is not related to a bigger issue. Chronic swelling may be an indication that you have inflammation present in your body. Inflammation that does not subside is a key factor in heart disease. Mention symptoms to your doctor so he or she can order the proper tests that may, in fact, save your life!

Reference:

(1) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

(2) Chris Iliades, MD

(3) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

Kac Young, a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. In the Heart Easy Cook Book sound nutritional advice is followed by family favorites that have been turned into heart healthy meals anyone can make and everyone will love.

Can You Feel Heart Disease? – Part 1

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By Kac Young ND, PhD, DCH

healthyheartThe short answer is: Yes. Obvious heart disease symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea, pain radiating down the arms, and sharp pain in the chest.
There are also other warning signs, that you can feel and observe that may point to heart disease. The sooner you get these checked out, the sooner you can rule out a heart attack that may take your life.

1. Swelling of the Feet and Lower Legs

Retention of fluid in the feet and legs is known as peripheral edema. You may notice “sock marks” on your lower legs at the end of the day. Edema may be a warning sign for heart failure. When your heart is not pumping well, fluid from inside your blood vessels can leak out into surrounding tissues. The legs and ankles are common locations for edema due to the power of gravity.

“Peripheral edema may be caused by a host of issues,” says Dr. Orringer. “The bottom line is that most people with peripheral edema do not have heart disease, but it could be an important sign if there are other warning signs or symptoms.” (1)

2. Male Pattern Baldness

Several large studies have confirmed the link between baldness and heart disease. Compared to men with a full head of hair, men with crown loss have an increased risk of heart disease of about 23 percent. Men with complete loss of hair on the top of their head have an increased risk of 36 percent.

Combine hair loss, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and you push the risk even higher.

3. Yellow Bumps on the Skin

Xanthomas are deposits of fat that build up under the skin. They may appear as small yellow bumps or as flat, wide plaques on your elbows, knees, hands, feet, or buttocks. A type of xanthoma called “xanthelasma palpebra” appears on the eyelids. These yellow, fat deposits can potentially be signs of heart disease because they may indicate high levels of fats in the blood.

4. Gum Disease

Swollen, sore, or bleeding gums are usually a sign of poor oral hygiene, but may also be an indication of heart disease.

Gum disease and heart disease are linked because they are both signs of poor circulation. Common bacteria can be involved in both gum disease and plaque build-up inside coronary arteries. The link may also have something to do with the body’s response to prolonged inflammation.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

Reference:

(1) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

(2) Chris Iliades, MD

(3) http://www.everydayhealth.com/heart-health/surprising-physical-signs-of-heart-disease.aspx?xid=tw_everydayhealth_sf

Kac Young, a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. In the Heart Easy Cook Book sound nutritional advice is followed by family favorites that have been turned into heart healthy meals anyone can make and everyone will love.

People At High Risk For Heart Disease (And What They Can Do)

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By Jason Kane

healthyheartbpHeart disease is one of the top killers of men and women in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one out of every four deaths is caused by heart disease.

Certain people are at a higher risk of developing it. Find out if you might be one of them, and how you can take preventative action against it now.

Smokers

Smoking tobacco products significantly raises your risk of developing heart disease or experiencing a heart attack. Likewise, long-term exposure to secondhand smoke can increase both of these health conditions as well.

To improve your heart health, quit smoking now. There is no better time. Visit your doctor to learn about smoking cessation programs that can help you be smoke-free.

Diabetics

People with diabetes or who are prediabetic are at a higher risk for developing heart disease. Prediabetics can make healthier lifestyle choices to reduce their risk of developing diabetes.
Daily exercise, a well-balanced diet and getting enough sleep are a few ways to start. Diabetics may have a more difficult time reducing their risk of heart disease though. High blood sugar levels can build up in your arteries, leading to excess plaque and ultimately, heart disease.

Speak with your doctor about ways that you can manage your blood sugar levels. In the meantime, diabetics can take some action on their own. Daily exercise is one of the easiest ways to manage blood sugar levels. Even a brisk, 30 minute walk can make a big difference. In addition to this, eating small meals throughout the day can ensure that your blood sugar levels are stable.

The Obese

bellymeasurementsmallObesity is one of the most common triggers of heart disease. This is partially due to the fact that many obese individuals also suffer from high cholesterol and high blood pressure, which put you at a higher than average risk for heart disease.

Individuals with a BMI over 30 are at the highest risk. Losing weight now and keeping it off will significantly reduce your risk of heart disease and other health complications. People who gain weight and lose weight often are also at a high risk.

The healthiest way to lose weight and maintain it is to change your lifestyle, and dedicate yourself to a healthy diet and exercise routine.

Hereditary Factors

If you have a family history of heart disease, stroke, or heart attacks, you may be at a higher risk of developing these conditions. However, hereditary factors do not overrule unhealthy lifestyle choices.

In fact, by simply eating healthier, drinking more water, sleeping enough, and exercising regularly, you can reduce your risk and in some cases, eliminate it entirely.

Heart disease is a serious health concern that affects thousands of Americans. You can reduce your risk by being proactive in your health. Take care of your heart by making healthy lifestyle choices. Use the information provided to help you get started on your journey towards a healthier, happier heart that is free of heart disease.

– Jason Kane spent 2013 doing everything he could to improve his heart health. His goal in 2014 is to help other people do the same. He is a professional blogger who writes for AEDs Today.

Researchers Join Forces With African-American Churches To Fight Cardiovascular Disease

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healthyheartA $1.4 million federal grant is helping a Florida State University-led research team partner with churches in Gadsden and Leon counties to combat the leading cause of death for African-American men and women — cardiovascular disease.

Funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, the three-year grant establishes the Health for Hearts United Leadership Institute (HHU Lead Project).

The project takes advantage of the strong support structures inherent in African-American churches to integrate proven health intervention strategies into church environments and the daily lives of their members.

“Cardiovascular disease is a major health issue for African-Americans, especially in the South,” said Professor Penny Ralston, the HHU Lead Project principal investigator and dean emeritus of FSU’s College of Human Sciences. “The strong churches we have in our area represent the perfect opportunity to engage faith communities and promote healthier lifestyles through a supportive and comfortable environment.

Through the HHU Lead Project, the research team and six host churches will work with 32 other churches in Gadsden and Leon counties to engage church members in healthy lifestyle practices such as eating healthy foods, especially fruits and vegetables, participating in physical activity on a regular basis, reducing stress and taking charge of their health.

The six host churches all are in Florida. They are Antioch Missionary Baptist Church and St. James AME Church in Quincy; New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church and Old Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Havana; and Greater Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church and Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church in Tallahassee.

Project collaborators on the project at Florida State are Jasminka Ilich-Ernst, the Hazel Stiebeling Professor of Nutrition in the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, and Iris Young-Clark, assistant director of FSU’s Center on Better Health and Life for Underserved Populations.

Other partners are Arrie M. Battle, Mother Care Network Inc.; Kandauda (K.A.S.) Wickrama, University of Georgia; Cynthia M. Harris, Florida A&M University; Catherine Coccia, Florida International University; and Jennifer L. Lemacks, University of Southern Mississippi.

Ralston, who also is director of the Center on Better Health and Life for Underserved Populations, worked with these same six churches in a previous five-year NIH grant to develop the initial 18-month Health for Hearts United intervention, which integrated healthy lifestyle practices in the participating churches.

healthyheartbpThat study tracked approximately 250 men and women age 45 and older who attended the six churches over a period of 24 months with four data collection phases. Preliminary outcomes of the project showed that over the study period, many of the participants maintained an increase in fruit/vegetable servings, a decrease in fat consumption, an increase in physical activity, improvements in cholesterol levels, and a decrease in waist and waist/hip ratio circumferences.

“This project has made a tremendous difference in our congregation. We’ve learned to focus more on eating healthier and eating the right kinds of food,” said the Rev. Lee Plummer, pastor of St. James AME Church in Quincy.

“Prior to this health initiative, we were not really focused on healthy habits that would reduce heart diseases. Scripture tells us, ‘For the lack of knowledge my people perish,’” Plummer said. “Since becoming a part of the project, we’ve learned much about heart diseases, the risk factors, and what to do to prevent heart diseases. As we take better care of our bodies, we are taking better care of the Temple of God.”

Under the new grant, the research team plans to work with the host churches to increase the reach of the HHU Leadership Institute by bringing more churches and church members into the program, ultimately sustaining the Leadership Institute on an ongoing basis to improve the cardiovascular health of African-Americans in the target counties and in other areas of North Florida.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for African-American men and women. National data show that African-Americans have higher illness rates and higher death rates than their Caucasian counterparts for both heart disease and stroke.

The state of Florida is included in what is known as the “stroke belt” because of its higher-than-average incidence of stroke among African-American residents.

“We know that healthy lifestyle changes are an effective way to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but making those changes are difficult for all of us,” Ralston said. “Our churches, through the HHU Lead Project, will provide the knowledge, support and encouragement for members to make lasting improvements in their lives.”

For more information about the HHU project, contact Ralston at (850) 645-8110 or pralston@fsu.edu.

Nutritional Supplements, Diet And Disease – Is There Evidence? An Integrated Perspective

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By Dr. Michael Wald

applevectorBelow we have provided just a few examples of links to the National Library of Medicine, a trusted source of scientific studies on virtually every condition and topic of scientific and health interest. You are free to search www.pubmedny.com (the website for the National Library of Medicine) for scientific articles on topics of interest. These articles are provided in an abstract form of full scientific studies or sometimes in complete free articles.

Studies are generally based on averages of individuals or animals or on other types of methods. They are not necessarily applied to the population at large or your individual needs. It is up to the practicing clinician to apply this information using careful history taking, individual testing and other methods of biochemical individualization. Not all of the studies provided below or on scientific websites like PubMed are in support of natural or nutritional approaches, nor do these studies entirely support the use of prevailing medical treatments or theories. Once again, it is the job of the practitioner to use scientific literature as a guide to determine how it can be best applied to the individual. Just because a study on vitamin E, or vitamin C is negative (showing it to be useless or harmful) does not mean that under a different circumstance it is not helpful and very useful. All too often, practitioners who are not scientifically minded, or are bias, fail to appreciate the scientific value of natural therapies. Sometimes nutritional therapies are dismissed simply because they are not taught in medical school. Few medical schools in the United States teach adequate nutrition. The average school provides less than 4 hours of training.

Our office acknowledges that medical specialties serve a valuable purpose, but are also limited by their compartmentalized approach to the “whole-person”. Our office researches medical and nutritional literature for information that may be applied to individuals, and then tests (i.e, blood work or other tests) how this information may be developed as part of a natural healing plan. Putting it all together is a special modality that we practice; we like to call it holistic-mindedness. Even the smartest, most compassionate and dedicated medical physicians in a given area of medicine will fall short if they fail to appreciate the interconnectedness of the individual patient and provide health care (and not merely disease care) that considers the genetics, current diet, health goals, medications, test results and other factors of the individual.

Confused by the difference in opinion found in books, on the news and among practitioners (even naturally-oriented one’s) that do not practice a truly integrated holistic approach? Well, you should be! By individualizing our treatments with our blood detective approach, our patience, and our dedication, we can “cut through” the confusion by applying our knowledge and efforts to the individual.

When someone says to us, “My doctor said that nutrition is a waste. There is no science behind it,” we hardly know how to respond. Just look at the number of studies that appear at the end of each of the scientific links below. These links are among thousands that are found on Pubmed and other search engines. Considering the confusion among many medical professionals, and the scientific evidence and concepts presented herein, it comes down to a matter of trust and common sense. The body requires nutrition to heal. Drugs provide symptomatic help, but do not replace good nutrition and nutritional supplements.

Your comments and questions are always appreciated.

SCIENTIFIC REFERENCES – Is there proof of nutrition and natural medicine

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=nutritional%20supplements%20and%20disease – Nutritional Supplements and Disease – Studies 7184

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=nutritional%20supplements%20and%20chronic%20disease – Nutritional Supplements and Chronic Disease – Studies 3171

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=nutritional%20supplements%20and%20longevity – Nutritional Supplements and Aging

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=nutritional%20supplements%20and%20infection – Nutritional Supplements and Infection

http://www.google.com/search?q=diet+and+disease&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a – Diet and Disease
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=vitamin%20c%20and%20disease%20treatment – Vitamin C and Disease Treatment

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=vitamin%20c%20and%20treatment – Vitamin C and Treatment – 14955 studies

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=vitamin%20A%20and%20disease – vitamin A and Disease – 4650 studies

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=vitamin%20E%20and%20disease – vitamin E and disease – 5842 studies

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Lyme Disease – The Masquerader Of Many Health Problems?

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By Dr. Michael Wald

You just don’t feel right

womanIf you’ve ever experienced a different kind of fatigue, a type that you’ve never felt before, perhaps with joint or muscle pains in various parts of your body, then you might have Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the spirochete Borrellia Burdorferi. Other symptoms such as headaches, memory loss, unexplained depression and nerve pains might also be caused by this troublesome tick-borne infection. Here is what you should know about Lyme disease treatment and the medical controversies, which may prevent your potential towards a full recovery.

Rash or no rash, and spread of the disease

Lyme disease is often first recognized by the appearance of one or more skin rashes called “a bullseye rash” or erythema chronicum migrans (ECM). This rash is caused by a local infection that may spread throughout the body. However, forty to fifty percent of the time you will not see a rash. The condition may therefore go undiagnosed for months or even years. Lyme disease starts locally, but can invade all parts of the body, including the skin, muscles, joints, nervous system, cardiovascular system, ocular tissues, sinus, GI tissue and even lungs. It is also thought that various autoimmune problems can be caused or triggered by the Lyme disease bacterial spirochete; and these conditions might confuse doctors.

Lyme Disease – What Is it the problem?

Our patients have gone from doctor to doctor and been given multiple diagnoses, including depression, arthritis, and memory and cognitive (i.e. memory) defects. Lyme disease that affects the nervous system is called neuroboreliosis. Some doctors believe that Lyme disease is always cured with a month long course of antibiotics, but other doctors believe that the condition can become chronic (long-lasting) and even progressive, resulting in misdiagnoses. Some conditions that might be confused with Lyme disease include: multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, hepatitis, bone marrow problems, other infections, arthritis, muscle pain, nerve problems and more.

Lyme Disease Diagnosis – problems

tickThe diagnosis of Lyme disease is usually a clinical one, but also may be supported by the presence of a number of antibodies upon blood testing. First stage testing is known as the enzyme link immunoabsorbent test (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The Western blot or immunoblot assays are used for secondary-level testing. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has said that five positive IgG bands and/or two positive IgM bands means that you are infected, but many patients have fewer bands or even no bands, and this does not mean that they do not have the disease. Unfortunately, one can have Lyme disease even with fewer lab findings then those set by the CDC. In fact, a person with Lyme disease can have negative tests for up to five years after they start to experience symptoms. There are other tests that can support the diagnosis of Lyme disease which are not performed by most mainstream doctors, but have substantial research backing including PCR testing and DNA amplification testing.

Integrated Healing Approach

An integrated medical approach for Lyme disease considers recent disease history, symptoms, genetic tendencies, and all other health issues. The identification of other infections is also part of our basic approach. After all, there are several tick-born infections beyond Lyme disease including various viruses’ and parasites that might be missed. Because many health problems can mimic Lyme disease, we have developed our Blood Detective Longevity Plan to uncover hidden health issues that might be confused for Lyme disease. Every individual is different. This is why we pride ourselves on developing both medical and nutritional approaches that fit our patients’ needs.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Brain Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease – Preventing Loss Of Self – Part 2

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By Dr. Michael Wald

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

brainthinkingCarnitine is a vitamin-like substance that is responsible for the transport of fatty acids into and out of the mitochondria. Evidence suggests that carnitine may protect neurologic tissue due to its antioxidant and energy producing activity, and its role in neurotransmitter function.
While there are many forms of carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) appears to have better activity in the central nervous system, including brain tissue. ALC administration in patients with primary degenerative dementia showed therapeutic efficacy in clinical, behavioral, and neuropsychological evaluations. A series of controlled studies suggests that ALC may slow the natural course of Alzheimer’s disease. In particular, persons with dementia given 1.5 to 3 grams ALC daily for 3 or 6 months have shown improvement in numerous clinical measures of cognitive function. In addition, “safety and tolerability of ALC [are] remarkably good,” further demonstrating the potential use of ALC in a number of progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Go to: www.blooddetective.com for L-Carnitine.

B vitamins, homocysteine, and neurological function in the elderly

Folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 are critical to many bodily processes, including the health of the nervous system, blood, and cells. In addition, these B-group vitamins have been shown to protect against depression, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, “the status of these vitamins is frequently inadequate in the elderly and recent studies have shown associations between loss of cognitive function or Alzheimer’s disease and inadequate B vitamin status.”

Research has shown that an inadequate B vitamin status may result in neurocognitive dysfunction through elevated homocysteine concentrations in the blood, or hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine is an amino acid that is produced in the human body. Prevalent in the elderly population, hyperhomocysteinemia is largely attributed to insufficient levels of folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12.

seniors2The association between cognitive dysfunction and hyperhomocysteinemia has been demonstrated in numerous studies. For instance, Dr. Selhub and colleagues reported “patients with Alzheimer’s disease had higher total plasma homocysteine concentrations than did age-matched healthy controls,” while “elderly patients with depression who had lower cognitive screening test scores had significantly higher homocysteine concentrations than did patients with normal cognitive screening tests.” Because folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 are often deficient among many elderly patients, the importance of these vitamins in the prevention of hyperhomocysteinemia and neurocognitive dysfunction cannot be overlooked. Be sure and use the active forms of folic acid (L-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid), B12 (methylcobalamine and pyridoxyl-5-phosphate.

Prevention is the key! Be proactive as most regular physicians have no nutritional training and are not up on the latest scientific nutritional literature and advances.

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Brain Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease – Preventing Loss Of Self – Part 1

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By Dr. Michael Wald

seniormanIf you are part of the baby boomer generation, then you face a unique problem; namely, the very real potential exists that you will loose your memory slowly over the later part of your life. Here are a few facts that you need to know:

• As you age your risk of memory loss, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease rises

• Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of the aging process. The incidence of the disease doubles every five years beyond the age of 65.

• As the number of people over age 65 doubles between 2010 and 2056 to approximately 88.5 million (or to about 20% of the population), those over the age of 85 will increase three-fold, and the incidence of memory issues, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease increases as well.

• A half of a million Americans younger than the age of 65 suffer from some form of dementia (memory loss) including Alzheimer’s disease.

Nutritional science offers some important options for the treatment and prevention of all stages of memory loss. If you think that you are suffering from memory loss first visit your doctor. Then seek out a trained clinical nutritionist to perform a detailed nutritional-health consultation and appropriate nutritional lab work. Here are a few things you might consider in the meantime:

Fatty acid levels analyzed in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid found in salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines, and shellfish and is essential for proper brain functioning. A lack of sufficient DHA may be associated with impaired visual functioning, depression, as well as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

brainAccording to Dr. Julie Conquer and colleagues in Lipids, low levels of omega-3 fatty acids, including DHA, may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment and/or dementia. A recent study sought to determine the concentration of DHA in a group of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias compared to a group of elderly control subjects with normal cognitive functioning. For each participant, blood was collected and tested for DHA concentration. Results demonstrated that the concentration of DHA was 48% less in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and 21% less in patients with other forms of dementia, compared to the elderly control subjects with normal cognitive function.

Dr. Conquer and colleagues stated, “A decreased level of plasma DHA was not limited to the [Alzheimer’s disease] patients but appears to be common in cognitive impairment with aging.” More studies are needed to investigate whether DHA supplementation can reduce the occurrence or symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. (Lipids 2000; 35(12): 1305-12.).

I have observed DHA deficiency in my clinical practice over the last 22 years. It’s my judgment that it is safe and worth adding as a nutritional supplement to a balanced diet. See: www.blooddetective.com for Krill Oil and Vegetarian Omega 3 Fatty Acid.

Acetyl-L-carnitine may prevent Alzheimer’s disease

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article shortly…..

– Dr. Michael Wald, aka The Blood Detective, is the director of nutritional services at Integrated Medicine of Mount Kisco, located in Westchester New York. He has appeared on ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer, Channel 11 PIX, Channel 12 News, CNN, The Food Network and other media outlets. Dr. Wald earned the name Blood Detective for his reputation to find problems that are often missed by other doctors. He earned an MD degree, is a doctor of chiropractic and a certified dietician-nutritionist. He is also double-board certified in nutrition. He has published over a dozen books with three additional titles due for release late 2013 including: Frankenfoods – Genetically Modified Foods: Controversies, Lies & Your Health and Gluten-A-Holic: How to Live Gluten Free and the Blood Detective’s Longevity Secrets. Dr. Wald can be reached at: www.intmedny.com or www.blooddetective.com or by calling: 914-242-8844.

Simple And Easy Tips To Help You Remain Positive Even With Kidney Disease – Part 2

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By Jenny McNally

Continued from part 1 of this article…..

3. Overcome All The Obstacles That Stand In Your Way in a Step By Step Fashion

womancouchNothing great in this world was ever achieved overnight. This is the reality and you need to stop trying to find shortcuts that claim to get you amazing results fast. The truth is that the only way that you’re ever going to achieve anything of significance is if you are prepared to put in the work every single day and do it in a step by step fashion.

Most individuals these days are not prepared to put in the work because they feel that it’s way too hard and that they will not be able to achieve the things they want to achieve.

But I’m here to tell you that it isn’t at all hard and that all you need to do in order to get amazing results is put in the work every single day! Make it a habit to accomplish your goals one baby step at a time and sooner or later you’ll get to where you want to be. It’s that simple my friend.

4. Build The Habit of Gratefulness

Focusing and being grateful for all the things that are good in your life will prevent you from focusing on the things that you don’t have. Being grateful is a really powerful way to remain positive, which is exactly what you want when you’re trying to overcome kidney disease.

WriterA great way to make this habit of gratefulness a permanent part of your life is to wake up every morning and just write down all the things that you really love and are grateful for.

It really doesn’t matter what it is, as long as you’re grateful just write it down. This habit will bring about some really powerful, positive feelings which will propel you toward getting healthier and healthier over time.

So there you go guys, all the tips you really need to start being a lot more positive in your everyday life. Focus on implementing them into your daily life and believe me you’ll find that overcoming kidney disease will be a walk in the park.

Overcoming kidney disease is all about knowing exactly what steps you need to take. This is why I’d recommend you check out http://kidneydietcure.com where you will find some great content written by Jenny McNally, who just loves to help people all over the world overcome kidney disease and get into amazing health!