What A Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease Means For Family Members

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publication….please share your thoughts below…..

seniorcitizenAn individual with a close relative with Alzheimer’s is at slightly higher risk for the disease. Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s risk genes is not generally helpful.

Alzheimer’s disease represents a personal health crisis, but it’s also a family concern. When someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, what does that mean in terms of the risk his or her children and siblings might face?

“People think that if their dad or aunt or uncle had Alzheimer’s disease, they are doomed, but that’s not true,” says Dr. Gad Marshall, assistant professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School. “Even though family history adds to the overall risk, age still usually trumps it quite a bit.”

Close relatives of someone who’s been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s have about a 30% higher chance of developing the disease themselves, according to the January 2016 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch. But it’s important to ask: “30% higher than what?”

A 65-year-old American’s annual chance of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s is about 2%. Having a relative with dementia raises that chance by around 30% — to 2.6%. “It means your risk is higher, but it’s not that much higher, if you consider the absolute numbers,” Dr. Marshall says.

Family members often wonder if they should be tested for the “Alzheimer’s gene,” called apolipoprotein E (also known as APOE4). The short answer is no. “Being tested for APOE4 is not going to be helpful, since it won’t tell you whether you will develop the disease,” Dr. Marshall says. “It will only tell you if you are at a greater or lower risk.”

Read the full-length article: “Alzheimer’s in the family”

Also in the January 2016 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

* How much meat in your diet is healthy?

* Four steps to prevent colon cancer

* Vitamins and vision

* What to do about knee pain

The Harvard Men’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Dietary Guidelines For Cardiovascular Disease

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts below…..although from August, it has a lot of valuable information…..

saladplateMore than 400 clinicians now hold a solution to help their patients combat the early signs and advanced stages of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide.

The nonprofit Physicians Committee concludes its third annual International Conference on Nutrition in Medicine (ICNM), accredited by the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (GWSMHS), in Washington this weekend, led by an international panel of 21 cardiovascular disease researchers.

“We’re offering a scientifically proven way to save lives and curb skyrocketing health care costs,” says conference host Neal Barnard, M.D., president and founder of the Physicians Committee and an adjunct associate professor of medicine with the GWSMHS. “A dietary intervention treats both the symptoms and root cause of heart disease, which can start in utero.”

The Dietary Guidelines for Atherosclerosis Treatment and Prevention, available at 2 p.m. EST on Aug. 1, compiles key information from panelists, including findings from the Bogalusa Heart Study from Gerald Berenson, M.D., with Tulane University’s Center for Cardiovascular Health, to the effectiveness of a plant-based dietary intervention for cardiovascular disease treatment from both Kim Williams, M.D., president of the American College of Cardiology, and Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., with the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute.

Dr. Barnard and David Katz, M.D., with Yale University’s Prevention Research Center, break down nutrition myths that surround dietary cholesterol and saturated fat, while Leena I. Kauppila, M.D., from Terveystalo Healthcare, and Stephen L. Kopecky, M.D., with the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, discuss back pain and erectile dysfunction, two underlying symptoms of heart disease.

Physicians new to writing dietary prescriptions will have a first-hand taste of fiber-packed, cholesterol-lowering foods after sampling chia seed pudding, fresh kale and beet salads, and plant-based vegan entrées, including Thai yellow curry, quinoa sweet potato cakes, roasted tomato hummus with squash linguine and pineapple relish, and local tofu with carrots, snap peas, and bok choy.

Clinicians will leave Washington with 13 continuing medical education (CME) credits and travel-friendly workout tips from exercise physiologist Marco Borges, founder of 22 Days Nutrition, who is now as well known for his Saturday “Wake-Up Call Workout” as he is for helping top stars, like Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez, stay in cardiovascular shape.

Visit PhysiciansCommittee.org/HeartHealth to download a copy of the Dietary Guidelines for Atherosclerosis Treatment and Prevention, to view speaker presentations, and to access heart-healthful nutrition tips and recipes.

CME videos of the conference’s presentations will be available later this year at NutritionCME.org.

Brisk, Regular Walking Helps Lessen Heart Disease Risk

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and Harvard Health Publications, please share your comments below…..

familywalk2A regular walking routine can lower blood pressure, stave off diabetes, and prevent heart disease. Finding walking buddies, using a pedometer, and following a walking workout plan may help people stick to a program.

Walking is a low-impact, do-anywhere exercise that helps lower blood pressure and stave off diabetes. And two large, long-term Harvard studies suggest that walking for about 20 minutes a day may cut the risk of heart disease by as much as 30%, according to the December 2015 Harvard Heart Letter.

But many people need some added inspiration to start — and stick with — a walking program. One of the best ways is to find walking buddies, says Dr. Lauren Elson, physical medicine and rehabilitation instructor at Harvard Medical School. “I find that if I can get someone to walk with — a partner, a spouse, or a friend — that helps a lot.” Even better is getting several friends to walk together, because they all hold each other accountable. “They call each other up and say, ‘Where are you?’” Dr. Elson says.

Other people find motivation by using a pedometer to track their steps and distance, says Dr. Elson. One review of 26 studies found that people who used pedometers raised their physical activity levels by nearly 27%, adding about 2,500 steps a day. Most stores that sell exercise equipment have inexpensive pedometers. Other options include smartphone apps that track steps, such as Moves, Breeze, or Pedometer++.

For people who’ve had a heart attack or been diagnosed with heart disease, walking is an ideal exercise because it can be easily adapted based on a person’s fitness level. People with heart failure should ask their physician to recommend a cardiac rehabilitation program to safely reap the benefits of exercise. This type of supervised exercise is particularly helpful for people who haven’t been active for a while.

Read the full-length article: “Marching orders: How to start a walking program”

Also in the November 2015 issue of the Harvard Heart Letter:

* Cardiac rehabilitation: Best medicine for recovery

* Heart-friendly holiday eating

* When blood pressure dips too low

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

New Study Links Endometriosis To Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

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By Tamer Seckin, MD

didyouknow?A new study out today is linking endometriosis to a higher risk of heart disease, particularly among women aged 40 years and under. The data shows that women in this age bracket are three times more likely to develop heart attack, chest pain or blocked arteries when compared to those without endometriosis of the same age. “This should be of real concern to doctor’s treating patients with endometriosis,” said Dr. Tamer Seckin, one of a handful of gynecologic surgeons in the United States who performs deep excision of endometriosis and is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi.

The study, published today in the Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association Journal, looked at the heart risk for women with endometriosis over a 20-year period. The study followed 120,000 women, of which about nearly 12,000 had endometriosis, and found that compared to women without endometriosis women with endometriosis were 1.35 times more likely to need surgery or stenting to open blocked arteries, 1.52 times more likely to have a heart attack and nearly two times as likely to develop angina.

“Studies on endometriosis are greatly needed, and I am pleased to see this research supported by the National Institute of Health,” said Seckin. Dr. Stacey Missmer, director of epidemiologic research and reproductive medicine at Brigham’s Women’s Hospital, who co-authored the study, spoke last year at the EFA’s 6th annual medical conference held in New York City.

According to the study, researchers noted that surgical treatment of endometriosis including the removal of the uterus and ovaries possibly accounts for the higher risk of heart disease. Seckin says this has been suspected for some time and is not a surprise to him. The study also reported that surgically induced menopause before natural menopause may also be an added risk.

The peer-reviewed paper also says that there is a specific and meaningful correlation between endometriosis and coronary heart disease. Seckin believes this may be due to the confounding systemic inflammation and chronic stress and pain.

Dr. Seckin urges that removal of the uterus and/or ovaries is not the optimal treatment for women with endometriosis. That is why he opts for deep excision surgery. Excision allows the surgeon to safely and successfully remove the disease and the inflammatory tissues.

“Deep excision surgery is about removing the endometriosis tissue from the body and preserving both the reproductive organs, and any other organs affected by the disease, as endometriosis often grows outside the reproductive tract in places like the bowel and colon,” said Seckin. “Treatment should offer a woman the best chance to regain a pain-free life, lessen long-term side effects from alternative therapies used to treat symptoms, and provide an opportunity for her to have children.”

Alternative therapies can include the use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and painkillers for treating patients with endometriosis. The study did account for oral contraceptive and hormone replacement exposure but could not evaluate details of other hormonal treatments or the use of painkillers.

While he is busy advocating that the reproductive organs not be removed during endometriosis treatment, Seckin also expresses concerns about the dangers of long-term usage of hormones and pain medications. “These therapies have their risks,” he added.“Whether-or-not heart disease is one of these dangers, or the disease itself is the cause has still to be determined, but this study tells us something is increasing the risk for heart disease in women with endometriosis.”

Seckin said that the study convinces him that removing the disease through minimally invasive surgery gives women the most relief from their symptoms and does not expose them to side-effects that could put their overall health at risk.

– Tamer Seckin, MD, is an endometriosis specialist and surgeon in private practice in New York at Lenox Hill Hospital. He is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA) with Padma Lakshmi. The EFA mission is to increase disease recognition, provide advocacy, facilitate expert surgical training, and fund landmark endometriosis research. Dr. Seckin is the author of “The Doctor Will See You Now; Recognizing and Treating Endometriosis” published March 2016 by Turner Publishing.

Early Detection Of Coronary Artery Disease

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your thoughts in the comments section below…..

hearthealthLarge multicenter clinical trial conclusively reveals Lev El’s newly discovered HeartTrends™ test to detect presence of ischemia related to coronary artery disease in individuals 3 times more accurately than conventional exercise stress testing Results translate immediately into early detection, lower health costs, no radiation, no toxic risk, no induced stress testing.

The latest clinical study on 450 patients has concluded that HeartTrends™– a new, innovative analysis of cardiac data obtained from standard Holter monitors — can determine with a high probability the existence of ischemic heart disease far better than the traditional exercise stress test, without exercise and with no inherent potential risk to patients. The HeartTrends test analyzes just 1 hour of heart data without the need for any special maneuvers or heart stress, making it especially advantageous for the elderly and handicapped.

The prospective study was conducted at Sheba and Shaarei Zedek Medical Centers (Israel) on 450 patients (279 males, 171 females) ranging in age from 50 to 72 and BMI from 23 to 35. Test results from both the exercise stress test and HeartTrendsTM analysis were subsequently compared to the gold standard Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI SPECT) using injected dye and radiation to positively confirm the existence of significant coronary artery disease. Results showed HeartTrends positively diagnosed three times more patients with heart disease than traditional exercise stress testing on the same patients. A negative HeartTrends result essentially rules out (negative predicative value of 98%) the presence of significant coronary artery disease.

A further important outcome shows that, out of the 450 patients tested using Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, only 7% had myocardial ischemia. This expensive and potentially radioactive 4-hour test was overused and was not required in over 93% of the patients. Use of HeartTrends could drastically reduce costs and use of radionuclide dyes such as thallium and technetium. Results of the study may be viewed on the Clinical Trials website (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).

“Now, for the first time, we have an ability to quickly detect and positively diagnose ischemic heart disease with no effort or stress on the part of the patient. More importantly, the test has the ability to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation testing involving thallium injections without sacrificing medical accuracy since less patients will be referred for advanced testing and even coronary angiography based on inaccurate exercise stress testing,” said Professor Ilan Goldenberg, MD, Director of Cardiology at the Sheba Medical Center and Director of the Israeli Association for Cardiovascular Trials.

“We believe that HeartTrends could become part of the standard annual testing checkup and without the risk or hassle of undergoing exercise stress tests to get early detection and treatment of ischemic heart disease. General health should increase immensely now that the handicapped, elderly, and obese can perform this test easily. Furthermore, reducing the number of MPI tests could immediately decrease healthcare costs,” said Michal Kahan, CEO, Lev El Diagnostics of Heart Disease Ltd.

About HeartTrends™:
A medically proven, non-invasive analysis obtained from just 1 hour of cardiac data from a standard Holter device to detect myocardial ischemia related to Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) at its early stages. This CE-cleared, HIPAA-compliant, web-based test consists of an innovative multivariate analysis that culminates in a conclusive test score. The test is inexpensive, performed in a clinic or at home, with no need for technicians or physician to be present during the test. It is envisioned to be utilized as the initial risk-free diagnostic tool for individuals both sick and healthy without known CAD disease. HeartTrends is available commercially on a server-based business model (no software or hardware license charges) throughout the world and shortly within the U.S. pending FDA approval.

About Lev El Ltd.
Lev El Diagnostics of Heart Diseases Ltd. (Lev El) is a privately-held biomedical company committed to delivering innovative prognostic capabilities for accurate and reliable cardiovascular disease detection.

Health Briefs TV Presents Segment On Preventing Heart Disease

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active familyHealth Briefs TV will soon broadcast a segment focusing on steps to take to prevent heart disease.

Health Briefs TV producers are pleased to present a segment focusing on steps to take to prevent heart disease. Roughly 60,000 people perish from the fatal medical problem every year – more than lives taken by diseases such as cancer. Medical professionals lecture patients that healthy lifestyle changes can prevent the development of heart disease, and save lives. The medically-themed segment can be seen on regional cable television networks throughout the country.

The Health Briefs TV show explores the emerging technologies, progressive treatments, revolutionary people, and innovative healthcare options that are all part of the global health industry. It explores topics relating to the health and medical fields and offers valuable information about the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many common ailments. The show’s producers take pride in sharing up-to-date, valuable information about new procedures, prevention tips and outstanding businesses. It also features interviews with innovative health and medical professionals in the industry.

Health Briefs TV is hosted by Kevin Harrington. It is headquartered in South Florida and films on location throughout the United States and Canada. It is broadcast on most regional and national cable television networks. The show is a proud leader of quality, educational programming. It is produced in part by Anthony DiMellio, Melissa Leibowitz, Andrew Mazza, and Rob Marshall. Join the fans, the show’s staff on popular social sites to discuss and comment on stories of the day. Learn more about Health Briefs TV on Facebook, Google+, Pinterest and health-briefs.com.

Doctor Reminds Patients Of The Link Between Gum Disease And Diabetes

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For those in the Hudson, NY area, hope you enjoy this article shared by PRWeb. Please share your thoughts in the comments section…..

toothIn honor of Diabetes Awareness Month, Dr. Robert E. Danz reminds patients that a link exists between gum disease and diabetes. This makes November is a good time for patients to visit their Hudson, NY dentist.

Dr. Robert E. Danz celebrates Diabetes Awareness Month by educating patients. One of the factors connected with diabetic risk is gum disease. Unfortunately, gum infections rarely cause pain in the early stages, leading patients to believe that it is not a serious concern. Actually, gum problems are significant. They can lead to increased oral problems and have been linked with many health complications, such as diabetes, cancer, stroke, heart disease, and other issues. Rather than wait for problems to worsen, Dr. Danz recommends patients visit a Hudson, NY dentist for the treatment they need.

Gum disease begins with bacterial plaque on the teeth and under the gums. This plaque hardens into tartar, or calculus. The hardened material irritates the gums, and in response they turn a darker color and begin bleeding more easily than normal. As calculus builds, it leaves a growing gap between the gums and teeth, creating pockets for bacteria to thrive. At this point, the gum disease has progressed far enough that it will not heal without treatment. Eventually, the pockets extend along the roots of the teeth until the bacteria infect the bone in the sockets, creating bone loss. If left untreated, it can cause the teeth to loosen and potentially require extractions. Throughout the progression of disease, bacteria can travel to infect other areas of the body through the bloodstream.

It is unnecessary for patients to endure gum disease. Regular dental examinations are enough to catch the disease in its early stages. Before it becomes severe, Dr. Danz performs treatment, such as the LANAP® protocol. This laser procedure eliminates the diseased tissue and loosens calculus to aid in removal. In as little as a single visit, patients undergoing treatment with this leading Hudson, NY dentist are put firmly on the road to recovery. Treatment requires no cutting, stitches, or grafting. It is minimally invasive, and healing afterward involves almost no swelling and very little discomfort.

Those who want more information about the link between oral health and diabetes, or about the LANAP® protocol, are encouraged to visit Dr. Danz’s website. He also invites anyone who is looking for a Hudson, NY dentist to contact his office. With a personal consultation, he can respond to individual questions.

About the Doctor

Robert E. Danz, DDS is a general dentist offering personalized dental care for Hudson, NY gum disease patients. Not only does Dr. Danz run his own practice, he is involved in his community. Dr. Danz received his dental degree from the New York University College of Dentistry after earning his bachelor’s degree from Long Island University. He has also taken numerous postgraduate education courses, specifically focusing on cosmetic and restorative dentistry. Dr. Danz is part of one percent of dental professionals providing the LANAP® FDA cleared laser procedure for gum disease treatment. To learn more about Robert E. Danz, DDS and his dental services, visit his website at http://www.hudson-dental.com and call (518) 444-4215.

Treating Gum Disease May Help The Heart

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Thank you to PRWeb for supplying this article. What are you thoughts? Please share in the comments section…..

smileGum disease, which happens when sticky, bacteria-laden film builds up and hardens around the teeth, has been linked to cardiovascular disease.

Gum disease has long been linked to heart disease. New research suggests that for people with both conditions, treating the gum disease may lower their health care costs and the number of times they end up in the hospital, reports the November 2014 Harvard Heart Letter.

Gum disease begins when the sticky, bacteria-laden film known as plaque builds up around your teeth. Daily tooth brushing and flossing and regular cleanings by a dentist or hygienist can prevent and even reverse gingivitis, the earliest form of gum disease (also called periodontal disease). Left untreated, gingivitis can turn into gum disease. The gums pull back from the root of the tooth, creating a tiny pocket that gradually widens. Eventually, the infection and inflammation attack the tissue that holds the tooth to the jawbone, which can cause the tooth to loosen and possibly fall out.

A study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine reviewed the medical and dental records of people who had gum disease in addition to cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease (usually a stroke), or another chronic health problem. People who had at least one periodontal disease treatment had lower medical costs and fewer hospitalizations within four years of the treatment compared with people who weren’t treated. For cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, health care costs were between 10% and 40% lower.

Treating gum disease reduces the body’s burden of infection and inflammation, which seems to help people respond better to treatments for other health conditions, like heart disease, says periodontist Dr. Alpdogan Kantarci of the Harvard-affiliated Forsyth Institute, a not-for-profit research organization focused on oral health. “As we’re always telling our physician colleagues, ‘Make sure your patients are getting regular dental care,’ because we may be able to help improve their overall health,” Dr. Kantarci says.

Read the full-length article: “Treating gum disease: Save your smile, help your heart?”

Also in the November 2014 Harvard Heart Letter:

* Exercise: The best medicine to slow aging

* Treating narrowed arteries in the neck

* For heart health, less salt makes the most sense

The Harvard Heart Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

10 Early Warning Signs Of Parkinson’s Disease

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By Hooman Azmi

newsAs many as one million Americans live with Parkinson’s disease: This is more than the combined number of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig’s disease. [1]

Parkinson’s is characterized by a lack of dopamine in the brain which, as a result, inhibits functioning in the central nervous system. “People with Parkinson’s disease may lose up to 80% of dopamine in their bodies before symptoms appear.”[2] Early treatment can include introducing various medications that will replace, prevent the breakdown of, or mimic the properties of dopamine in the body. Deep Brain Stimulation is also a common option in patients who don’t respond to medication or who exhibit an advanced condition because it utilizes a high frequency electrode to provide stimulation to the impaired movement center of the brain.

“Early intervention is the key to a high functioning, superior quality of life. Therefore, it is crucial for people to be aware of the early signs and symptoms of this debilitating disease.” – Dr. Hooman Azmi.

According the Parkinson’s Foundation, there are 10 early warning signs of Parkinson’s disease.

They include:

* Tremors or Shaking

* Small Handwriting

* Loss of Smell

* Trouble Sleeping

* Trouble Moving or Walking

* Constipation

* A Soft or Low Voice

* Masked Face

* Dizziness or Fainting

* Stooping or Hunching Over

To learn more about Parkinson’s disease, its warning signs and treatment options, Dr. Azmi is available for interviews. Please contact Steve Allen Media at sara@steveallenmedia.com or 201-906-8251 or 661-255-8283.

– Hooman Azmi, M.D., Director of the Division of Movement Disorders at Hackensack UMC, specializes in the surgical treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. Dr. Azmi explains, “For those patients who are diagnosed early, we are able to successfully treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s with several medications and surgical procedures.”

[1] According to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation

[2] According to Parkinson’s Health.com

Health: Practice Addition To Subtract Disease

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By Ann Musico

HealthWhen most people think about improving their health or losing weight, they naturally think about all the “bad” foods they love that they will have to eliminate from their diets. Even if they begin full steam ahead, sooner or later they think longingly about their favorite junk food. Allow those thoughts often enough and you set yourself up for failure. I have a different take on this. I believe that by gradually adding in healthier food choices, they will naturally crowd out the unhealthier ones.

For most of us, going on a strict diet of just vegetables and water is only going to last so long! Every commercial on TV is going to have your special favorite snack food and before very long you will throw up your hands, throw caution to the wind and the veggies and water will become a distant memory. Then you are back where you started.

I suggest making any changes very gradually. In this way you don’t become overwhelmed and frustrated and you are able to create a new normal, step by step. For example, why not just add in one fresh, raw salad daily. It could be part of your lunch or your dinner. Then when others are having French fries, you will have added in that healthy and delicious salad. It will be so filling and satisfying you won’t even miss the French fries.

Do this for a few weeks and you will have created a new normal for yourself. By adding in one healthy food choice, you eliminated one very unhealthy one pretty easily. Let’s go another step further. Once a daily salad becomes a habit for you, you might decide to carry a small baggie of raw nuts for those times when you are away from home and hunger pangs strike. Where you normally would’ve looked for a vending machine or bought some other processed snack food, you grab your baggie of nuts and find that they really satisfy your hunger – and much longer than cookies or candy ever did! Soon you find you’ve added another healthy habit and subtracted another one effortlessly!

saladplateThen you can experiment with seasonal fresh fruits when you normally would’ve grabbed a bowl of ice cream at night. Berries, peaches, pineapple, melons are all in season in the summertime and so sweet and delicious! You can make them into a fruit salad, combine them with plain Greek yogurt or make a delicious protein shake and you have added in more nutrition and subtracted empty calorie foods that sap your energy.

Math is not my strong suit but honestly, this simple kind of addition and subtraction is something I have no problem doing! Give it a try and see how much easier it is to add good things in than to focus on trying to subtract the unhealthy ones.

– Ann Musico is a holistic health coach who helps women, at every age, to exemplify lives of vibrant health and wholeness – spirit, soul and body. Her mission is to show women how to adopt a healthy lifestyle in a way that is simple and achievable, empowering them to take responsibility for their own health in order to be a positive influence on their families. You can visit her website at threedimensionalvitality.com