CDC Report: Today’s Drug-Resistant Health Threats

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb and the CDC, please leave your comments below…..
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Improved infection control and antibiotic prescribing could save 37,000 lives over five years.

Every year, more than two million people in the United States get infections that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a result, according to a new report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report, Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013, presents a first-ever snapshot of the burden and threats posed by the antibiotic-resistant germs that have the most impact on human health. This report is also the first time that CDC has ranked these threats into categories of urgent, serious, and concerning.

* In addition to the illness and deaths caused by resistant bacteria, the report found that C. difficile, a serious diarrheal infection usually associated with antibiotic use, causes at least 250,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths every year.

* The loss of effective antibiotic treatments will not only cripple the ability to fight routine infectious diseases but will also undermine treatment of infectious complications in patients with other diseases. Many advances in medical treatment, such as joint replacements, organ transplants, and cancer therapies, are dependent on the ability to fight infections with antibiotics. If the ability to effectively treat those infections is lost, the ability to safely offer people many of the life-saving and life-improving modern medical advances will be lost with it.

* The use of antibiotics is the single most important factor leading to antibiotic resistance around the world. Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs used in human medicine. However, up to half of antibiotic use in humans and much of antibiotic use in animals is unnecessary or inappropriate.

To combat antibiotic resistance, CDC has identified four core actions that must be taken:

1. Preventing Infections, Preventing the Spread of Resistance: Avoiding infections in the first place reduces the amount of antibiotics that have to be used and reduces the likelihood that resistance will develop during therapy;

2. Tracking: CDC gathers data on antibiotic-resistant infections, causes of infections and whether there are particular reasons (risk factors) that caused some people to get a resistant infection;

3. Improving Antibiotic Use/Stewardship: Perhaps the single most important action needed to greatly slow the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant infections is to change the way antibiotics are used;

4. Development of Drugs and Diagnostic Tests: Because antibiotic resistance occurs as part of a natural process in which bacteria evolve, we will always need new antibiotics to keep up with resistant bacteria as well as new diagnostic tests to track the development of resistance.

Vital Signs is a report that appears on the first Tuesday of the month as part of the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators.

New CDC Vital Signs Report – Alcohol Poisoning Kills Six People In The US Each Day

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informationMore than 2,200 people die from alcohol poisoning each year in the United States – an average of six deaths each day – according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Three in four alcohol poisoning deaths involve adults ages 35-64 years, and most deaths occur among men and non-Hispanic whites. American Indians/Alaska Natives have the most alcohol poisoning deaths per million people.

Alcohol poisoning deaths are caused by drinking a large amount of alcohol in a short period of time. This can result in very high levels of alcohol in the body, which can shutdown critical areas of the brain that control breathing, heart rate, and body temperature – resulting in death.

More than 38 million U.S. adults report binge drinking an average of four times per month and consume an average of eight drinks per binge. Binge drinking is defined as consuming four or more drinks for women and five or more drinks for men on an occasion. The more you drink, the greater your risk of death.

“Alcohol poisoning deaths are a heartbreaking reminder of the dangers of excessive alcohol use, which is a leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S.” said CDC Principal Deputy Director Ileana Arias, Ph.D. “We need to implement effective programs and policies to prevent binge drinking and the many health and social harms that are related to it, including deaths from alcohol poisoning.”

Alcohol poisoning death rates varied widely across states, from 46.5 deaths per million residents in Alaska to 5.3 per million residents in Alabama. The states with the highest death rates were in the Great Plains, western United States, and New England.

CDC scientists analyzed deaths from alcohol poisoning among people aged 15 years and older, using multiple cause-of-death data from the National Vital Statistics System for 2010-2012.

Alcohol dependence (alcoholism) was identified as a contributing factor in 30 percent of these deaths, and other drugs were noted to have been a factor in about 3 percent of the deaths. While this study reveals that alcohol poisoning deaths are a bigger problem than previously thought, it is still likely to be an underestimate.

“This study shows that alcohol poisoning deaths are not just a problem among young people,” said CDC Alcohol Program Lead and report coauthor Robert Brewer, M.D., M.S.P.H. “It also emphasizes the importance of taking a comprehensive approach to reducing binge drinking that includes evidence-based community strategies, screening and counseling in healthcare settings, and high-quality substance abuse treatment for those who need it.”

Vital Signs is a report that appears each of the month as part of the CDC journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators. These are cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, motor vehicle passenger safety, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, alcohol use, health care-associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, food safety, and viral hepatitis.

Vital Signs is a monthly report that appears as part of the CDC journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

CDC Reports: Millions Of US Women Are Not Getting Screened For Cervical Cancer

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Thank you to PRWeb for sharing this article from the CDC. Please share your thoughts in the comments section…..

newsDespite evidence that cervical cancer screening saves lives, about eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened.

“Every visit to a provider can be an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer by making sure women are referred for screening appropriately,” said CDC Principal Deputy Director Ileana Arias, Ph.D. “We must increase our efforts to make sure that all women understand the importance of getting screened for cervical cancer. No woman should die from cervical cancer.”

Researchers reviewed data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to determine women who had not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years. They analyzed the number of cervical cancer cases that occurred during 2007 to 2011 from CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program. Cervical cancer deaths were based on death certificates submitted to the National Vital Statistics System.

Key Findings:

• In 2012, 11.4 percent of women reported they had not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years; the percentage was larger for women without health insurance (23.1 percent) and for those without a regular health care provider (25.5 percent).

• The percentage of women not screened as recommended was higher among older women (12.6 percent), Asians/Pacific Islanders (19.7 percent), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (16.5 percent).

• From 2007 to 2011, the cervical cancer incidence rate decreased by 1.9 percent per year while the death rate remained stable.

• The Southern region had the highest rate of cervical cancer (8.5 per 100,000), the highest death rate (2.7 per 100,000), and the largest percentage of women who had not been screened in the past five years (12.3 percent).

Using the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as a primary prevention measure could also help reduce cervical cancer and deaths from cervical cancer. Another recent CDC study showed that the vaccine is underused; only 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 7 boys had received the 3-dose series in 2013. The HPV vaccine is recommended as a routine vaccine for children 11 – 12 years old. Modeling studies have shown that HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening combined can prevent as many as 93 percent of new cervical cancer cases.

Even with improvements in prevention and early detection methods, most cervical cancers occur in women who are not up-to-date with screening. Addressing financial and non-financial barriers can help increase screening rates and, in turn, reduce new cases of and deaths from this disease.

Learn more about recommended ages and tests for cervical cancer screening.

Learn more about HPV vaccine recommendations.

Vital Signs is a report that appears each of the month as part of the CDC journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators. These are cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, motor vehicle passenger safety, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, alcohol use, health care-associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, food safety, and viral hepatitis.

CDC Reports: Only 3 In 10 Americans With HIV Have Virus In Check

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An interesting article from PRWeb and the CDC….what are your thoughts? Please share in the comments section below…..

newsCDC urges HIV testing and treatment to prevent new infections and save lives.

Just 30 percent of Americans with HIV had the virus under control in 2011, and that approximately two-thirds of those whose virus was out of control had been diagnosed but were no longer in care, according to a new Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The new study underscores the importance of making sure people with HIV receive ongoing care, treatment, and other information and tools that help prevent transmission to others, as well as the need to reach more people with HIV testing. Among those whose infection was not under control, more than three times the proportion (66%) were no longer in care as had never been diagnosed (20%).

The HIV epidemic continues to threaten the health and well-being of many Americans – with more than one million people living with the disease in the U.S. and 50,000 new infections each year.

When used consistently, antiretroviral medication can keep HIV controlled at very low levels in the body (known as viral suppression), allowing people with HIV to live longer, healthier lives and reducing the likelihood they will transmit HIV to others. Treatment has been shown to reduce sexual transmission of HIV by 96 percent, and U.S. clinical guidelines now recommend that everyone diagnosed with HIV receive treatment, regardless of their CD4 cell count or viral load.

“For people living with HIV, it’s not just about knowing you’re infected–it’s also about going to the doctor for medical care,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “And for health care facilities, it’s not just about the patients in your care–it’s every person diagnosed, and every person whose diagnosis has not yet been made. Key to controlling the nation’s HIV epidemic is helping people with HIV get connected to–and stay in –care and treatment to suppress the virus, live longer and help protect others.”

The new study estimates that of the 1.2 million Americans living with HIV in 2011, 70 percent did not have their virus under control. Among the nearly 840,000 people who had not achieved viral suppression:

* 66 percent had been diagnosed but were not engaged in regular HIV care,

* 20 percent did not yet know they were infected,

* 4 percent were engaged in care but not prescribed antiretroviral treatment, and

* 10 percent were prescribed antiretroviral treatment but did not achieve viral suppression.

Vital Signs is a report that appears each month as part of the CDC journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The report provides the latest data and information on key health indicators. These are cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco use, motor vehicle passenger safety, prescription drug overdose, HIV/AIDS, alcohol use, health care-associated infections, cardiovascular health, teen pregnancy, food safety, and viral hepatitis.

New CDC Vital Signs Report Shows Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Are Frequent And Costly

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newsAmericans spend more than 1 million days in the hospital each year from crash injuries.

More than 2.5 million people went to the emergency department (ED) – and nearly 200,000 of them were hospitalized – because of motor vehicle crash injuries in 2012, according to the latest Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lifetime medical costs for these crash injuries totaled $18 billion. This includes approximately $8 billion for those who were treated in the ED and released and $10 billion for those who were hospitalized. Lifetime work lost because of 2012 crash injuries cost an estimated $33 billion.

“In 2012, nearly 7,000 people went to the emergency department every day due to car crash injuries,” said CDC Deputy Director, Ileana Arias, PhD. “Motor vehicle crash injuries occur all too frequently and have health and economic costs for individuals, the health care system, and society. We need to do more to keep people safe and reduce crash injuries and medical costs.”

Key findings include:

* On average, each crash-related ED visit costs about $3,300 and each hospitalization costs about $57,000 over a person’s lifetime.

* More than 75 percent of costs occur during the first 18 months following the crash injury.

* Teens and young adults (15-29 years old) are at especially high risk for motor vehicle crash injuries, accounting for nearly 1 million crash injuries in 2012 (38 percent of all crash injuries that year).

* One-third of adults older than 80 years old who were injured in car crashes were hospitalized – the highest of any age group.

* There were almost 400,000 fewer ED visits and 5,700 fewer hospitalizations from motor vehicle crash injuries in 2012 compared to 2002. This equals $1.7 billion in avoided lifetime medical costs and $2.3 billion in avoided work loss costs.

For this Vital Signs report, CDC analyzed ED visits due to crash injuries in 2012 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The number and rate of all crash injury ED visits, treated and released visits, and hospitalized visits were estimated, as were the associated number of hospitalized days and lifetime medical costs.

Vital Signs is a monthly report that appears as part of the CDC journal, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

– This article is provided by PRWeb

CDC And AAHPERD Release New Guide

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familyjogSchools across the country will now have access to step-by-step guidance and evidence to help children and youth obtain at least 60 minutes of physical activity before, during and after school every day. A new guide for schools to develop, implement and evaluate comprehensive school physical activity programs has been released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (AAHPERD). The guide can be downloaded at: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/cspap.htm

According to AAHPERD Senior Program Manager Francesca Zavacky, one of the authors, “The guide can be read and utilized by a group that either already exists (e.g., school health council or wellness committee) or a new group or committee that is made up of physical education coordinators and teachers, classroom teachers, school administrators, recess supervisors, before- and after-school program supervisors, parents, and community members. It can be used to develop a new comprehensive school physical activity program or assess and improve an existing one. “

Since 2006, CDC has provided funding to AAHPERD to improve the quality of physical education and physical activity programs through a cooperative agreement project; development of the guide is an integral part of AAHPERD’s work plan activities. A writing team, made up of academic and education professionals, was assembled by the two organizations to develop earlier versions of the guide.

“Schools can create more active environments, where all students have the opportunity to be physically active at different times and places throughout the school day,” said Holly Hunt, Chief, CDC’s School Health Branch. “This is a timely and powerful tool that will assist all 50 states now funded to promote healthy school policies and practices through CDC’s cooperative agreement State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors and Promote School Health. Specifically, many state health departments will work with schools to develop, implement, and evaluate comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAP).

The guide is also the foundation for a new Physical Activity Leader (PAL) training being conducted across the country as part of First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! Active Schools initiative, of which AAHPERD is a managing partner. As part of its CDC cooperative agreement activities, AAHPERD will conduct PAL professional development training in states receiving enhanced funding as part of the CDC grants to states.

About the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD)

The vision of AAHPERD is “Healthy People – Physically Educated and Physically Active!” Headquartered in Reston, VA, 25 miles west of Washington, DC, AAHPERD is the largest organization of professionals involved in physical education, physical activity, dance, school health and sport—all specialties related to achieving an active, healthy lifestyle. Founded in 1885, its mission is to advance professional practice and promote research related to health and physical education, physical activity, dance and sport by providing its members with a comprehensive and coordinated array of resources, support and programs to help practitioners improve their skills to further the health and well-being of the American public. For more information, visit www.aahperd.org.

Finding Balance (Video From The CDD)

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More than one third of U.S. adults are obese. Weight gain occurs when you consume more calories than your body uses. Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight will help you prevent and control many diseases and conditions. The key is FINDING A BALANCE in your lifestyle that includes healthy eating and regular physical activity.

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– Courtesy of The CDC

CDC Vaccination Commercial

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I wanted to share this cute CDC Vaccination Commercial. For over 60 years, CDC has been dedicated to protecting health and promoting quality of life through the prevention and control of disease, injury, and disability. We are committed to programs that reduce the health and economic consequences of the leading causes of death and disability, thereby ensuring a long, productive, healthy life for all people.

CDC Reports Dropping Rates In Childhood Obesity

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From Your Health Journal…..”I do enjoy visiting the FOX News site often, as they have some quality, informative articles that pertain to health. I encourage visitors to Your Health Journal to visit FOX News for some great articles (link below). Today’s article review from FOX is about childhood obesity rates going down. This has been a hot topic over the years, and now, some positive news. As the article states, the number of low-income preschoolers who are obese has dropped, although modest, a positive sign. They can attribute this positive change to healthy food now available to some lower income families, which is a great thing, and long overdue. These families are also being taught the value of physical activity. As most of us know, obesity in general has been on the rise over the years, contributing to heart disease and type 2 diabetes. So, although a modest improvement, a very positive sign. Please visit the FOX site to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

The number of low-income preschoolers who qualify as obese or “extremely obese” has dropped over the last decade, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show.

Although the decline was only “modest” and may not apply to all children, researchers said it was still encouraging.

“It’s extremely important to make sure we’re monitoring obesity in this low-income group,” said the CDC’s Heidi Blanck, who worked on the study.

Those kids are known to be at higher risk of obesity than their well-off peers, in part because access to healthy food is often limited in poorer neighborhoods.

The new results can’t prove what’s behind the progress, Blanck told Reuters Health – but two possible contributors are higher rates of breastfeeding and rising awareness of the importance of physical activity even for very young kids.

Blanck and her colleagues used data on routine clinic visits for about half of all U.S. kids eligible for federal nutrition programs – including 27.5 million children between age two and four.

They found 13 percent of those preschoolers were obese in 1998. That grew to just above 15 percent in 2003, but dropped slightly below 15 percent in 2010, the most recent study year included.

Similarly, the prevalence of extreme obesity increased from nearly 1.8 percent in 1998 to 2.2 percent in 2003, then dropped back to just below 2.1 percent in 2010, the research team reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Whether kids are obese is determined by their body mass index (BMI) – a measure of weight in relation to height – and by their age and sex.

To read the full article…..Click here

Guest Post – Philip Tucker, Dramatic Rise In Diabetes From 1995 To 2010

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diabetesThe US Centers for Disease Control has just released a new report on the prevalence rates of diabetes in the US in their Friday edition of Morbidity and Mortality, and the news isn’t good. While we all know that the rate of diabetes has been rising, and that everywhere alarm bells are being sounded and medical professionals are warning about the dire consequences of this unchecked growth, rarely do you see concrete numbers comparing today’s rate to that of previous years. The CDC’s report gives us exact figures, and shows us that since 1995 the prevalence rate has jumped dramatically.

The CDC has created this report by pulling data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which annually surveys adults aged 18+. Using the BSFSS’s data going back to 1995, the CDC found that the median prevalence of diabetes cases had increased from 4.5% in 1995 to 8.2% in 2010.

This means that as of 2010, out of the total US population of about 310,000,000, an estimated 18.8 million people in the US had been diagnosed with diabetes, and another 7.0 million had undiagnosed diabetes.

This means that as of 2010, out of the total US population of about 310,000,000, an estimated 18.8 million people in the US had been diagnosed with diabetes, and another 7.0 million had undiagnosed diabetes. The stunning fact is that this increase in diabetes held true across all groups, sexes, races and ethnicities, making diabetes a truly universal problem for our nation.

While the rates of increase may have differed from state to state, the fact remains that every state (including Puerto Rico and D.C.) as of 2010 has greater than 6%. Six states, however, had rates that were greater than 10%. These were Alabama, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia. Only twelve states reported between 6% and 7%: Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Vermont, and Wyoming.

What’s perhaps even more shocking was not just the sheer percentage of people within each state that reported having diabetes, but the rate of increase that certain states showed relative to their 1995 figures. While most states ranged between a 50% to 100% increase, Oklahoma reported a stunning 226% increase, while Kentucky reported 158%, Georgia 145%, Alabama 140%, and Washington 135%.

girlsignThese rates of increase show that the problem is rapidly spiraling out of control, and that over the next decade it is nearly impossible to imagine how many people may develop diabetes, and what the ultimate cost may be to both our citizens and to our nation. It’s sobering to remember that these numbers and rates do not reflect the sizeable group of people who are prediabetic, have borderline diabetes, or women with gestational diabetes.

In light of these numbers the CDC stated that we need to focus ever more attention on strategies to prevent diabetes and the elimination of risk factors, while citing the continued need of vigilant surveillance of the rise of diabetes across the nation so that we may be aware of the epidemic that is afflicting our country.

– Phil Tucker is a health and fitness blogger. Visit his website to learn more, or read his blog!