New Book – Calories In, Calories Out: Which Side Of The Energy Balance Equation Outweighs The Other?

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Thank you to PRWeb for providing this article about a new book. Please share your thoughts in the comments section….

saladsStudies are underway to test the effectiveness of types of calorie labeling on foods. Will knowing both the number of calories and the amount of exercise it will take to burn off those calories be more effective in consumers making healthier food choices?

Catherine Jones and Elaine Trujillo, MS RDN, authors of The Calories In Calories Out Cookbook (The Experiment, 2014), espouse the idea that effective weight loss and maintenance come from knowing both sides of this equation. Their critically-acclaimed new book, showcasing 200 delicious low-calorie recipes, gives readers both the calories in and calories out values. It’s the only cookbook that has taken this bold and novel approach and applied it to home cooking. The mission of the 400-page tome is to promote a healthy lifestyle through cooking at home, using whole versus processed foods, and stepping up exercise to achieve energy balance.

Before the research results of the ongoing studies are validated, Jones and Trujillo have jumped the gun by giving readers all the information they need in their book. As Jones says, “Knowing both the calories in and calories out values make eating and drinking a much more conscious process. You’ve got facts the to help you make the healthiest choices possible. When you’re lured by the sweet scent of a large gooey Cinnabon, and we all have our weak hungry moments, knowing that it contains 880 calories that will take about 200 minutes to burn off, might empower you to walk by and feel good.”

The trend towards calorie awareness is catching. Major food companies are beginning to shift their focus to lower-calorie, reduced-fat, healthier foods. In a five-year study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, results showed that Americans have cut back an average of 78 calories from their daily diets, reducing 6.4 trillion calories in sales of food and beverages. The excellent news is that this reduction is driven by consumer demand. Processed food sales have been stagnant, and a marketing campaign against sugary sodas has been highly effective. Companies have changed to smaller package sizes, they are adding less oils, sugar and salt, and many are actively inventing healthier products.

Yet the fact remains that over one-third of adults in the United States are obese, and obesity is a culprit of many of the serious health problems from diabetes to heart disease. More needs to be done to prevent a looming national health crisis and economic disaster with rising healthcare costs.

Would listing calories out values on foods help reverse the rates of weight gain and obesity? Jones says, “It’s certainly worth sharing that knowledge with consumers. It can only empower them and it will teach the younger generations to think twice before they eat. They are the ones that will ultimately reverse this rising weight trend, or not.”

With Halloween around the corner, trillions of calories are about to be poured into the streets. Kids and adults will spike their sugar levels to the moon. Have you ever thought to consider the total number of calories that can be held by a smiling jack-o-lantern-shaped loot bag? According to a study by Loyola University Medical School, the average trick-or-treater collects 4,800 calories and over three cups of sugar. For some, who make collecting candy their primary goal, the calorie count can be much higher, even into the tens of thousands. The Calories In and Calories Out Blog has practical advice on what to do with all that loot. So, before you get your costumes on, find your running shoes to burn off the booty.

CATHERINE JONES is the award-winning author or coauthor of numerous cookbooks including Eating for Pregnancy: An Essential Nutrition Guide and Cookbook for Today’s Mothers-to-Be, and, with Elaine Trujillo, The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook and Eating for Lower Cholesterol. She is a nonprofit founder, app developer, frequent blogger, and freelance journalist. ELAINE TRUJILLO, MS, RDN, is a nutritionist who has years of experience promoting nutrition and health and has written numerous scientific journal articles, chapters and textbooks.

Balance your Family Right This Summer!

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By Helen Agresti

familyAre you setting your child up for a healthy life? Your willpower as a parent will most likely determine the health of your child’s life as an adult. Naturally, children acquire their parents eating habits and practices.

Now that summer vacation is upon us, most parents stress over the abrupt change of schedule and finding enough activities to occupy their kids. Whether you’re a stay at home parent or a working parent, it’s a challenging time to be a chauffer, cook, and housekeeper. In the midst of this chaos, most parents find themselves taking the “whatever’s easy” or “convenient” path to feeding their family.

Even with game filled nights of lacrosse, soccer, or a swim meet, planning healthy family dinners 3-4x a week should be achievable. If we can make time for camps, practices, and games, we can find the time to eat healthy meals at home with our family. Many people often ask, but how do I balance our busy summer schedule with having enough time to prepare healthy meals at home?

Here are a few things you can do to achieve that balance:

1. Schedule family dinners on the calendar at least 1 week in advance. Pencil in an entrée on each of those days. For example, grilled salmon, barbecue chicken, pork tenderloin or pulled pork sliders.

2. Grocery shop with a plan. Work around your entrées for the week. Purchase enough produce to create easy to prepare side dishes. For example, corn on the cob, asparagus, salad greens, and zucchini.

greenpeppers3. Save time by having your vegetables washed and your entrée marinating prior to dinnertime.

4. Don’t commit to everything. Avoid spreading your family too thin. There’s nothing wrong with putting what’s best for your family first.

5. Limit your time on social media. Program your phone to alert you when it’s time to disconnect. We’re much more productive when we allow ourselves a specific amount of time to be social.

6. Enjoy the moment. Get your kids involved with preparing family meals. Use this time to talk and listen to your kids. Sitting down at a table with your family should be free of distractions from the television, phone, and laptop.

Cheers to a Healthy, Happy, and Safe Summer!

– Helen Agresti is a Registered Dietitian with Professional Nutrition Consulting, LLC. For more healthy tips and recipes visit her on the web at pronutritionconsulting.com.

Finding Balance (Video From The CDD)

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More than one third of U.S. adults are obese. Weight gain occurs when you consume more calories than your body uses. Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight will help you prevent and control many diseases and conditions. The key is FINDING A BALANCE in your lifestyle that includes healthy eating and regular physical activity.

CDC Video Player.  Flash Player 9 is required.
CDC Video Player.
Flash Player 9 is required.

– Courtesy of The CDC

Work-Life Balance- Having It All

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By Diane Lang

womanWe have been discussing work-life balance on the news a lot lately due to the Yahoo and Best Buy news of “no-more” working from home and how that affects moms and others who work from home. Psychotherapist, author and positive living speaker, Diane Lang, offers two main tips for moms who may be feeling stressed and pressured due to the telecommuting change or any change in their work-life balance.. Lang advises to make our goal to feel balanced by being healthy and happy. This way when stressful situations come our way (and they will frequently) we can handle them with grace and resiliency. If we are optimistic in general then we can handle stress quicker and be more resilient about it.

“My question is: why do we even try for the unrealistic expectation that we could have it all? That statement alone is stressful. Just trying to reach that expectation sets us up for failure. We only have a certain amount of hours in a day with a lot of tasks and responsibilities. I feel that instead of making that a goal for women that we should remove it from the table and remove some of the stress that comes with it,” shares Lang, the author of two books, Baby Steps: The Path from Motherhood to Career and more recently, Creating Balance and Finding Happiness.

healthdietWe need to remember that everyone had a different definition of happiness, success and balance. So, what might be a great work-life balance for one won’t be for the other? The truth is something will not get as much attention as the other. It’s the choice of the woman but not everything can get a 100% attention all the time and when we try to strive for that we end up putting ourselves last and getting sick both physically and emotionally even hitting burnout. If we have burnout then did we really have it all?

Instead try making a priority list and including yourself on it. Actually not just on the list but number 1 on the list. You can’t have a good life and be a great mom/employee if you’re not healthy both emotionally and physically. It’s impossible so why try for that. Don’t self-sabotage your dreams by forgetting to put yourself in them. Balance isn’t just about juggling time and schedule. Balance is keeping yourself healthy and happy.

Two things we need to do to stay balanced:

1. Are your basic needs met? We are what we eat, how much we sleep, the water we drink and exercise.

2. Reduce stress — we can’t live a stress free life so again don’t try instead work on reducing stress with activities like meditation, yoga, breathing techniques, gratitude, spending time in nature, music, time with friends and exercise.

Let’s make our goal to feel balanced by being healthy and happy. This way when stressful situations come our way (and they will frequently) we can handle them with grace and resiliency. If we are optimistic in general then we can handle stress quicker and be more resilient about it.

Diane Lang is a Positive Living Expert and psychotherapist – is a nationally recognized speaker, author, educator, therapist and media expert. Lang is extremely mediagenic and offers expertise on a variety of health and wellness topics about creating balance and finding happiness through positive living as well as multiple mental health, lifestyle and parenting needs. In addition to holding multiple counseling positions, Diane is also an adjunct professor at Montclair State University.

Finding Balance

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Thank you to the CDC for providing this educational video…..

More than one third of U.S. adults are obese. Weight gain occurs when you consume more calories than your body uses. Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight will help you prevent and control many diseases and conditions. The key is FINDING A BALANCE in your lifestyle that includes healthy eating and regular physical activity.

CDC Video Player.  Flash Player 9 is required.
CDC Video Player.
Flash Player 9 is required.

– Courtesy of the CDC