American College Of Sports Medicine Installs New Officers

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Thank you to ACSM for supplying this article…..

womanweightsThe American College of Sports Medicine installed its officers for 2016-17 at the organization’s annual meeting in Boston, Mass. Lawrence A. Armstrong, Ph.D., FACSM, 2015-16 president, passed the gavel to Elizabeth A. Joy, MD, MPH, FACSM as the 59th president of ACSM. Dr. Joy is a physician practicing at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City.

In addition to serving as medical director for Community Health and Clinical Nutrition at Intermountain Healthcare, Dr. Joy practices family medicine and sports medicine at the Salt Lake LiVe Well Center, and is an adjunct professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. She has previously served as vice president, and on the Board of Trustees of ACSM, and was on the Board of Trustees for the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine. She is on the editorial board for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine and is an associate editor for Current Sports Medicine Reports.

Walter R. Thompson, Ph.D., FACSM, of Georgia State University was installed as president-elect. Holly Benjamin, M.D., FACSM, of University of Chicago and William Kraus, M.D., FACSM of Duke University’s School of Medicine were installed as vice presidents. A complete list of ACSM’s new officers and trustees can be viewed here.

The American College of Sports Medicine is the largest sports medicine and exercise science organization in the world. More than 50,000 international, national and regional members and certified professionals are dedicated to advancing and integrating scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science and sports medicine.

February Is American Heart Health Awareness Month

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This article is courtesy of PRWeb, please share your comments below…..

healthyheartbpThe CDC has teamed up with Million Hearts for American Heart Health Awareness and NJ Top Docs wants you to do the same.

The CDC has teamed up with Million Hearts® in order to prevent one million strokes and heart attacks in the U.S. by the year 2017. Each New Year, people all over the world set personal goals to accomplish by the end of the year. Whether it’s losing those five pesky pounds, quitting smoking, or visiting relatives more often, there should definitely be this one goal on everyone’s list: staying on top of their heart health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages people each February (and all year round), to pay attention to their blood pressure. NJ Top Docs wants its readers to join the CDC and Million Hearts® in this national campaign.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. More than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure, making it four times more likely for them to die from a stroke and three times more likely to die from heart disease. Most times, there are no signs or symptoms of high blood pressure. It is imperative that people check their blood pressure regularly.

The CDC offers the following suggestions to maintaining good heart health:

“Ask your doctor what your blood pressure should be. Set a goal to lower your pressure with your doctor and talk about how you can reach your goal. Work with your health care team to make sure you meet that goal. Track your blood pressure over time. One way to do that is with this free wallet card[920 KB] from Million Hearts®.

Take your blood pressure medicine as directed. Set a timer on your phone to remember to take your medicine at the same time each day. If you are having trouble taking your medicines on time or paying for your medicines, or if you are having side effects, ask your doctor for help.

Quit smoking—and if you don’t smoke, don’t start. You can find tips and resources at CDC’s Smoking and Tobacco website.

Reduce sodium intake. Most Americans consume too much sodium, which can raise blood pressure. Read about ways to reduce your sodium and visit the Million Hearts® Healthy Eating & Lifestyle Resource Center for heart-healthy, lower-sodium recipes, meal plans, and helpful articles.”

More information about high blood pressure is available at CDC’s High Blood Pressure website. In addition, the following resources are available to help you and your loved ones make control your goal:

High Blood Pressure: How to Make Control Your Goal

Supporting Your Loved One with High Blood Pressure

African Americans Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet

Sources:
http://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/

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The Great American Switch Out: Ten Ways You Can Improve Your Heart Health Today

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by Kac Young PhD, ND, DCH

healthychoiceSWITCH OUT: Saturated fats like butter, cheese and whole milk FOR: Nuts, avocados and non-fat milk, “The Good Fats”.

SWITCH OUT: White pasta and white rice FOR: whole wheat and whole grain pasta or brown rice pasta or brown rice.

SWITCH OUT: Sugary breakfast cereals FOR: whole grain, plain cereals that you sweeten with fruit and berries.

SWTCH OUT: Sugary sodas, candy and cookies FOR: plain water, club soda, fruit and vegetable snacks accompanied by a tablespoon of freshly-ground peanut butter.

SWTCH OUT: Fast food smoothies (which contain 32 cubes of sugar) FOR homemade blended fruit drinks made with ice and non-fat milk.

SWTCH OUT: Premade pasta sauces (usually high in sugar and sodium) FOR: low-fat, low-salt versions or homemade sauces you make with fresh tomatoes and herbs.

SWTCH OUT: Sodium and sugar-rich barbeque sauces FOR: homemade versions where you control the sugar and salt.

SWTCH OUT: Canned soup (high in salt) FOR: homemade soup with plenty of beans and veggies.

SWTCH OUT: Canned vegetables (usually high in sugar and salt) FOR: fresh or frozen vegetables

SWTCH OUT: Fast foods like pizza, hamburgers, and fried chicken FOR: whole grain pizza you make yourself with veggies and cheese substitute, turkey or veggie burgers without the cheese and pickles, roasted chicken you make at home or use a Panko coating for a crispy taste.

Once you get the hand of switching out, you’ll be on your way to feeling better, losing weight and doing your heart a huge favor.

Kac Young , a former television director and producer, has earned a PhD in Natural Health and is a Doctor of both Clinical Hypnotherapy and Naturopathy. She is the author of 10 books. Heart Easy™ is a system of nutritionally sound, delicious meals that promote heart health, long life and taste great. Traditional recipes are turned into heart healthy meals that anyone can make. The health results are outstanding. While earning her PhD in Natural Health and a Doctorate in Naturopathy, she completed 36 courses in nutrition from Baylor University.

Can A Little Extra Weight Help You Live Longer When You Are Older?

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bellyFrom Your Health Journal…..”Well, a story appear to be resurfacing again that we wrote about last month. NPR did a great job in its story called Don’t Count On Extra Weight To Help You In Old Age by Scott Hensley. Recent research of nearly 100 published studies involving almost 3 million people found that being a little overweight was associated with a lower risk of death than having a normal weight or being obese. BMI, or Body Mass Index was used for the study. BMI takes height and weight measurements, and lets us know if someone’s weight falls within a healthy range. BMI has been controversial in many circles regarding its accuracy, but if you are looking for a quick, basic assessment of someone’s body type, it is a popular measure. The problem I have with this study – many people will read it and think it is now okay to go out and gain some weight, as they feel it may be healthy for them, and help them live longer. There is still a lot more research needed in this area to be 100% conclusive, as demographics, prior health of the study group, environment, and family history all play in big role in the accuracy of this study. Please visit the NPR web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. It gives many helpful opinions that could benefit some of us.”

From the article…..

Wouldn’t it be great, considering how many of us are overweight, if carrying a few extra pounds meant we’d live longer?

A recent analysis of nearly 100 published studies involving almost 3 million people found, surprisingly, that being a little overweight was associated with a lower risk of death than having a normal weight or being obese.

The sweet spot, as it were, appears to be a body mass index ranging from 25 to less than 30. The findings were published in early January in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

But is the finding real? An editorial in the same journal pointed to problems with BMI as tool for assessing obesity. And it suggested that artifacts in the data might be another factor behind the results.

The lowest death rates in most studies have been seen for people with a BMI between 22 and 25, the editorial point out. The authors suggested that the most important findings from the analysis were that death rates were higher for the obese (BMI of 35 or more) and people who were quite underweight (BMI less than 18.5).

As luck would have it, Ryan Masters, a demographer at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, has been looking into some of the same data that have been cited in support of the so-called obesity paradox.

“I sort of gingerly came into this field and was blown away by the debate surrounding it,” he tells Shots. Some of the theories advanced to explain the paradox include a beneficial metabolic effect from modest fat reserves for the elderly and cushioning in case of falls, he says.

Masters decided to look at the data, and he found problems in plain sight.

Some of the studies excluded people who lived in institutions, like nursing homes, skewing the results toward healthier people. Frail people would be less likely to participate in surveys and studies, too, he says.

He also found a problem that he said reminded him of a report about falling cats in Manhattan. Researchers found, paradoxically, that cats falling from windows on the highest floors of apartment buildings were more likely to survive than those who stumbled out of window on middle floors, say the fifth or sixth floors.

To read the full article…..Click here

Obesity: American Medicine’s Epic Fail

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bigpantsFrom Your Health Journal…..”I always enjoy articles from Forbes.com, and found a great one recently written by Leah Binder entitled, Obesity: American Medicine’s Epic Fail. Ms. Binder starts off by discussing how a magazine is promoting the next great weight loss miracle – the magazine reveals the identity of this “miracle” food – it’s chia seed. The author nails it on the head when she discusses how chia seed (like most miracle diets) are like getting a lottery ticket – we know the odds are against us, but maybe just this once we’ll hit pay dirt. Millions of people shell out hard-earned cash in hopes of finding the golden weight loss cure, which creates a $60.9 billion weight loss industry in the U.S. So many times, the quick scheme weight loss programs prove to be ineffective for many people, although some people do have success, but again, so many do not have this type of luck. Many businesses want their employees to be fit and trim, as they feel it improves productivity, and the government wants its citizens to be thin, so healthcare does not cause the debt to get worst. Please, take the time to visit the Forbes site (link provided below) to read the complete article. I enjoyed it a lot, and learned a lot from it.”

From the article…..

In case you missed it, this week’s featured cover story in Woman’s World Magazine, available at the register in every supermarket and drugstore in the U.S., claims to have found the next weight loss miracle. But I’ll save you the $1.79 and reveal the identity of this “miracle” food – it’s chia seed. It’s even endorsed by TV’s Dr. Bob Arnot.

Logically, we all question whether munching chia seeds will melt fat, but we still might buy the magazine. It’s like getting a lottery ticket – we know the odds are against us, but maybe just this once we’ll hit pay dirt. Millions of us shell out hard-earned cash in hopes of finding the golden weight loss cure, creating a $60.9 billion weight loss industry in the U.S.

Businesses are also investing in weight-loss, and the cost to them is significant. Over 90 percent of employers offering health insurance report investing in some kind of wellness program, usually designed to address the many health and disability costs associated with the increasing girth of the workforce. As discussed in one of my earlier Forbes.com posts, the research on whether they are seeing returns for these programs shows that, so far, the answer is no. The harsh reality is that scientists know as much about curing obesity as they do about curing the common cold: not much. But at least they admit their limitations in treating the cold. Many doctors seem to think the cure for obesity exists, but obese patients just don’t comply. Doctors often have less respect for obese patients, believing if they would just diet and exercise they’d be slim and healthy.

Some physicians notably take exception to the blame-the-patient approach to the obesity epidemic. “In case you hadn’t noticed, the obese will do anything not to be obese, even throw their money away on ‘get-thin-quick’ schemes,’” says Robert H. Lustig, MD, in his new book, “Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease.” The book details the evidence and concludes that research overwhelmingly discredits the notion that the obese bring the whole thing on themselves. “Obesity is a combination of several factors: physics, biochemistry, endocrinology, neuroscience, psychology, sociology and environmental health, all rolled up into one problem,” Lustig explains, “The factors that drive the obesity pandemic are almost as myriad as the number of people who suffer from it.”

To read the full article…..Click here

Japan Has Many Problems, But Obesity Isn’t One Of Them

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From Your Health Journal…..”I always promote great health stories I find on the International Business Times web site. Today’s article is called, Japan Has Many Problems, But Obesity Isn’t One Of Them. I encourage you to visit the IBT web site (link provided below) to read the complete article. This story starts by discussing how Japan has to deal with many issues, but obesity is not one of them. As of 2009, only about 3.5 percent of the Japanese population was classified as obese, versus rates as high as 30 percent or greater in the U.S. and elsewhere. Thanks to a relatively healthier Japanese diet and lifestyle, Japanese women and men live longer and healthier than everyone else on Earth. The Japanese live about five years longer than their counterparts in the U.S. and with far lower rates of disability and illness. Is there a lesson to be learned? Is it something other countries should reproduce, or could it be higher levels of stress? But, a very interesting article. Please visit the IBT site to read the complete article.”

From the article…..

Japan suffers from many trends that trouble the remainder of the developed world, including a falling birth rate, a rapidly aging population, rising health care costs for the elderly and a stagnating economy.

But happily, Japan isn’t burdened so much by one of the gravest health care crises sweeping across virtually all other wealthy nations: obesity.

According to data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, or OECD, as of 2009, only about 3.5 percent of the Japanese population was classified as obese, versus rates as high as 30 percent or greater in the U.S. and elsewhere.

But happily, Japan isn’t burdened so much by one of the gravest health care crises sweeping across virtually all other wealthy nations: obesity.

According to data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, or OECD, as of 2009, only about 3.5 percent of the Japanese population was classified as obese, versus rates as high as 30 percent or greater in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Indeed, if Japanese firms don’t cut the number of overweight employees by 25 percent by the year 2015, they may be required to pay more money into health care programs for the elderly.

Along with the aging population, health care costs are projected to double by 2020.

To read the full article…..Click here

Will Strapping Fitness Trackers On Our Kids Help America’s Childhood Obesity Problem?

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From Your Health Journal…..”Please take the time to read Cassie Slane’s article in the Huffington Post called Will Strapping Fitness Trackers On Our Kids Help America’s Childhood Obesity Problem? Could we strap a fitness gadget to them to see what kind of activities they are doing during the day to help them fight obesity? There are many who support fitness gadgets to help children lose weight and fight obesity. We have gotten some good reports over the last couple weeks that obesity rates among children have dropped in some major cities, but there is still some work to be done. Please visit the Huffington Post site (link provided below) to view the complete article.”

From the article…..

If we are already monitoring our kids’ every move on the Internet and reading their texts and posts on Facebook, couldn’t we also strap a fitness gadget to them to see what kind of activities they are doing during the day to help them fight obesity?

I just reviewed the latest fitness gadgets on Fox, and they are quite informative. Mom’s could easily attach them to their kid’s belt loop and have complete knowledge of how much their child walked, ran up stairs or was sedentary throughout the day. Parents could then log what their child ate and have a computer readout on why their child may be having trouble maintaining a healthy weight.

This is crazy talk, right? Not really. One company is betting that parents will embrace it. A company called GeoPalz makes an activity tracker just for kids called the ibitz PowerKey that works with a mobile app. The $50 pedometer, available on its website now and retail stores in April, counts steps that can be collected and then cashed in for games, apps, shows or custom prizes through Amazon.com.

The product couldn’t be more timely, as childhood obesity rates in America have tripled over the past three decades and today, nearly one in three children ages two-19 are overweight or obese, according to the American Heart Association. If the numbers don’t decline, one-third of all children born in 2000 or later will suffer from diabetes at some point in their lives. Many others will face chronic obesity-related health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer and asthma.

The question is, will parents use the device in the right way? I think tracking a child’s activity through the day could be a slippery slope when it comes to a child’s self-esteem. Imagine a parent telling junior that he needs to do a couple of laps around the house to balance out the pizza he ate for lunch because he didn’t take enough steps during the day. Or the mom who tells her daughter that if she wants to get a field hockey scholarship to Stanford, she better hustle more in practice because her numbers weren’t as good on her tracker as last week’s.

To read the complete article…..Click here